Biltmore Rose Garden Awarded Prestigious ‘Award of Excellence’

Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams

“Education is the key to the heart of rosarians of the World Federation of Rose Societies. People from all over the world have on their bucket list to travel to every WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ Rose Garden in the World. The Biltmore Rose Garden is a welcome, exciting addition to our world class rose gardens.” says Jolene Adams

Asheville, NC ~ The Biltmore Rose Garden, home of the world famous International Rose Trails, host to rose breeders and rosarians from Canada, the U.S., France, Ireland, Great Britain, and Germany was awarded the prestigious World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) ‘Award of Excellence’, Friday, September 24th in the Biltmore Estate Rose Garden. On hand to receive the award from Vice President of the World Federation of Rose Societies, Jolene Adams was Biltmore Horticulturalist, Parker Andes, and Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson as well as this year’s Biltmore International Rose Trial judges and sponsors of the event; Witherspoon Roses, Mr. & Mrs. David Pike, and Mills Mix Rose Fertilizer, Mr. & Mrs. John Beaty. The highly sought after and prestigious ‘Garden of Excellence’ Award was established to improve the public’s knowledge in all matters concerning the rose. ‘Award of Excellence’ Gardens world wide must meet the following requirements to qualify:

The WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ recognizes the highest levels of arrangement in the field of rose garden development, maintenance and display.

  1. Eligibility. A garden may be eligible for an award which has:
  2. Demonstrated sustained performance in providing high quality displays of roses which are:
  • Beautiful and attractive and open to the public (and/or)
  • Educational, whereby the knowledge of the public and its interest in roses is enhanced (and/or)
  • Of assistance with the preservation of the genus (or)
  1. Sustained performance in conducting international rose trials.
  2. Private gardens will be considered, but the public must have unlimited access throughout the full flowering period.

    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden
    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden

Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson graciously accepted the award from Ms. Adams during the Friday evening at the reception of the Biltmore International Rose Trials that will be conducted Saturday, September 25th. All judges for the 2016 Biltmore Rose Trials were on hand for the unveiling of the ‘Award of Excellence’ to view its permanent home in the Biltmore Rose Garden. For More information to tour the estate and Biltmore Rose Garden garden visit. www.biltmore.com and more information about WFRS gardens visit www.worldrose.org

'Strike It Rich' A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance
‘Strike It Rich’ A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance

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Editors, please note: Photos are available on request to the media contacts on this release.

Media Contact: Susan Fox at gagasgarden.com@gmail.com

About The World Federation of Roses

The World Federation of Rose Societies is a federation of the national rose societies of 39 countries founded in 1968 representing rose lovers around the world. Their goal is to expand contact among them and increase the flow of knowledge about the rose.

The World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) was founded in 1968 in London, England by representatives from the rose societies of Australia, Belgium, Israel, New Zealand, Romania, South Africa, Great Britain and the USA. Its stated purpose was to hold international rose conferences and act as a clearing house for rose research.

To encourage and facilitate the interchange of information about and knowledge of the rose between national rose societies; To coordinate the holding of international conventions and exhibitions; To encourage, and where appropriate, sponsor research into problems concerning the rose; To establish common standards for judging rose seedlings; To assist in coordinating the registration of rose names; To establish a uniform system of rose classification; To encourage and advance international cooperation on all matters concerning the rose.

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Some Roses “Like It Hot”

A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses | One of My Favorites

Some Roses Like It Hot

This is an updated article I wrote for The American Rose The Magazine of The American Rose Society edition July/August 2014 to now include Illinois Roses 

This is 'Sugar Moon' in the foreground and 'Francis Meilland' in the background
This is ‘Sugar Moon’ HT Roses in the foreground and ‘Francis Meilland’ HT Roses in the background | ‘Julia Child’ a yellow floribunda rose

How hot is too hot for roses?

Moving from Texas to Illinois in June of 2011 I thought I was saying good-bye to mind numbing days of counting the days of temperatures over 100, water restrictions, and days without rain. Then the summer of 2011 the entire nation faced a 100-year drought and record heat. Even though I had had enough of Texas heat it seems I had packed up Texas weather and taken it with me to the rolling cornfields of Central Illinois. The summer of 2011 was also a 100-year draught across much of the nation proving once again a message that rosarians can convey to each other and those new to growing roses. Roses are resilient and can withstand very hot temperatures as long as they are watered regularly. Click to read: Killer Texas Summer Shatters Heat Drought Records.

Close-Up of 'Watercolors Home Run' Shrub Rose
Close-Up of ‘Watercolors Home Run’ Shrub Rose

Fast forward June 2016!

Here’s the Question I was asked to answer for readers of American Rose Magazine July/August edition 2014 

Question: Do you think its better to “use canopies or individual coverings for roses during extreme heat conditions or let your roses sulk in the summer heat”?

'Sugar Moon' Hybrid tea Rose in The Illinois Garden After Sustained Heat
‘Sugar Moon’ Hybrid tea Rose in The Illinois Garden After Sustained Heat

There’s more than one answer to the question:

When roses (and virtually any other plants) reach the point of excessive water stress, they don’t “feed,” nor do they try to grow. They simply try to remain alive. That’s why even when you’re watering daily with what feels like excessive water amounts, many rose bushes will begin shedding their leaves to reduce their water stress. With less leaves and they don’t “sweat”,  transpire it through the foliage. That slows and can literally stop the flow of sap from the roots upward, so no food is taken in. Nature demands balance. Even in times of extreme heat I have seen my roses continue to remain beautiful with just smaller blooms and less frequent bloom cycles. Roses seem to go into almost a dormancy state to conserve energy and water.

'Easy Does It' In The Illinois Garden Close-Up
‘Easy Does It’ In The Illinois Garden Close-Up

Answer: For the purpose of this article I chose to let my Roses swelter in both N. Texas and now Central Illinois heat with protection in mind to identify heat tolerant roses that perform better under extreme heat and low water conditions. 

Here’s ways that we can continue to grow good roses and preserve our plants and maintain water restrictions. In extreme heat like the DFW area I recommend protection and filtered light as protection from the unending heat rather than canopies if possible and here are a few tactics I employed in N. Texas while growing over 200 roses there. I had hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas, miniatures, shrubs, David Austin Roses, Large Flowered Climbers, and Knock-Outs.

'Bolero' In The Illinois Garden Setting
‘Bolero’ In The Illinois Garden Setting
  1. Select roses suitable for a hot climate. I have a list of modern roses that I have proved can survive extreme N. Texas heat for 20 + years. And you can also plant OGR’s that are adapted to heat, those in existence before 1867. The beauty of these roses lie in their heady fragrance and can include Hybrid Perpetuals, Teas, Chinas, Hybrid Musks, Bourbons and other Classes like these. Avoid using antique roses bred for colder climates such as the Kordes Roses and Rugosas.
  2. Just as dark colors retain heat and light colors keep us cooler, lighter-colored roses can hold up to extreme heat better than dark reds, and oranges do. Plant darker colored roses where there is some protection or perhaps less than full sun. Choose some white, light-pink and pale yellow roses that seem to hold up better to extreme temperatures.
  3. The elevated beds I put in in N. Texas allowed me to put in a laser cut drip irrigation watering system. I watered deeply and at the base of the plant, not directly on the leaves of the plant. I set timers to water very early in the morning not ever during full sun. During times when water restrictions were in place we could use the hose and I deep watered allowable amounts and my roses did just fine. Remember that dehydration during summer months can put your plants in peril. If you have an irrigation system in place be sure that it’s set to water at least 2 inches of water per week, and does not water directly on the leaves of the plant during full sun. This is difficult to determine when you take into consideration factors like wind, temperature and type of soil. So you may want to purchase a moisture gauge for your rose garden.
  4. Fertilize from two weeks to 30 days prior to when you expect hot weather to reach and maintain temperatures near 98F. Organic fertilizers and soil amendments are far less likely to burn your plants even during sustained high temperatures. For those of you living in zones where temperatures really start to warm up in late-February, this is a time to begin fertilizing. Then fertilize monthly until mid-May when temperatures start to rise. You really have to watch carefully your fertilizer to water ratio during the hottest months. That should be your signal to start reducing your fertilizing until late in the summer.
  5.  Shredded hardwood mulch retains moisture and keeps the soil cooler; I use layers of hardwood mulch over Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss that I add each season.
  6. Plant roses with protection from afternoon sun and be sure they still receive at least 6 hours of direct morning sunlight.
  7. Roses love to grow in largely organic soil with good drainage. To grow the best roses in summer heat, plant your rose in a deep hole that drains well. Water regularly and deeply, In Texas my roses in the front yard had indirect afternoon sun with the dappled light of oak trees I planted that grew to be mighty shade providing oak trees, and this provided a canopy of well-needed cooling shade cover.

    'Bolero' In The Heat of Summer In Illinois
    ‘Bolero’ In The Heat of Summer In Illinois

You can use a shade cloth cover if that is aesthetically acceptable to you. Don ‘t plant roses next to a South or West facing wall, especially stone or brick because the stone holds heat that can also burn your plants and will reflect too much heat. My roses that I planted and added stones along a path held heat late into the evening on a hot summer day due to absorbing qualities of the stone and I could see these roses suffered from the excessive heat of the stone, the roses with grass next to them were far cooler. Don’t forget that layers of mulch help to keep the soil cool. Spraying off the roses in the evening helps to cool your plants and wash away spider mites but never spray during direct sunlight.

My Susan Fox Top Ten List from my Texas  & Illinois Garden Garden

  1. Julia Child, F
  2. Francis Meilland, HT
  3. Sugar Moon, HT
  4. Pretty Lady Rose, HT
  5. Bolero, F
  6. Easy Does It, F
  7. Take It Easy, S
  8. Pumpkin Patch, F
  9. Watercolors Home Run, S
  10. Europeana, F

I also thought I would ask Minnesota Rose Gardener Jack Falkner about heat in the a northern climate and here’s what Jack had to say:

“Folks are often surprised to hear that we get a lot of hot weather in Minnesota in the summer.  It’s not at all unusual for us to see temperatures upwards to the high nineties and 100, along with very high humidity.  That’s when I wash my roses at mid-day to cool them down.  Syringing is also the best thing you can do to control spider mites.  You can use any kind of nozzle that delivers a sharp stream, but I use a spider mite blaster that shoots a high-pressure fan of water up from the bottom of the plants and they love it.  An added advantage is that I get pretty wet in the process, which makes me feel like a kid running through the sprinkler on a hot day.” ~ Jack Falkner

Magnificent 'Take It Easy' in Full Bloom
Magnificent ‘Take It Easy’ in Full Bloom
'Pumpkin Patch' Candelabras Light Dawn With An Orange Glow
‘Pumpkin Patch’ Candelabras Light Dawn With An Orange Glow

 

 

The Northwest Flower & Garden Show | Grow & Learn

Gaga's Little Red Barn, A Symbol of the country lifestyle, and the transition of urban life, moving from Plano, Texas to a village of 1100 in Illinois.
Gaga's Little Red Barn, A Symbol of the country lifestyle, and the transition of urban life, moving from Plano, Texas to a village of 1100 in Illinois.
Gaga’s Little Red Barn, A Symbol of the country lifestyle, and the transition of urban life, moving from Plano, Texas to a village of 1100 in Illinois.

“Con­sumers are constantly connected, and that’s not a bad thing,” says Susan McCoy, Garden Media president. “It’s time for the industry to fully embrace technology and all it can do for the garden. The more consumers learn about nature, the more they will grow to care about it.” ~ Susan McCoy

Logo

GARDEN 101: Garden Royalty

The Secret to Landscaping With Roses

Day: Wednesday, 2/17/2016

Time: 2:15 PM

Seminar Room: Rainier

Roses, Bearded Iris and Peony have graced gardens for more than a century. Today they are deservedly popular, with more varieties than ever before, many suitable for NW gardens. These Beauty Queens need not be intimidating! Join three nationally acclaimed experts, as they share the secrets to getting the most from of these plants. Rosarian Susan Fox, horticulturist Kelly D. Norris and Peony expert Kathleen Gagan will inspire your love affair with these magnificent plants.

Gaga's Illinois Rose Garden, the elevated garden of hybrid teas, floridunda's, and David Austin Roses.
Gaga’s Illinois Rose Garden, the elevated garden of hybrid teas, floridunda’s, and David Austin Roses.

See It, Learn It, Do It: Practical Insights to Grow Your Gardening Skills

“We have a wide array of seminars to help you amp up your skills in the garden. Learn to prune like a pro, divide your perennials, grow healthy blooming orchids, plant a shrub or tree (so it doesn’t die), start seeds, and make light work of those inevitable weeds!

'Above and Beyond' by Dr. David Zlesak
‘Above and Beyond’ by Dr. David Zlesak

Miniature Roses: Hot New Color Spots

Susan Fox – Consulting Rosarian and author, Four Seasons of Roses Monthly Guide to Rose Care

Roses are the perfect flower choice when you want to create an ever-changing splash of color. From bud to a fully open rose, minis and multifloras lure you back to your garden each morning. These are winter hardy, easy-to-grow perennials that can make a color spot so rich and intriguing you will be lured back to your garden just to see the bloom cycles And some miniatures can be grown both indoors and outdoors.

Four Seasons of Roses Monthly Guide to Rose Care

Date: Thursday, Feb 18 at 6:45 pm / Book signing to follow

Seminar Room: Hood

Proven Winners 'Oso Easy' Pink Cupcake
Proven Winners ‘Oso Easy’ Pink Cupcake

See It, Learn It, Do It: Come to The Northwest Flower & Garden Show The 2nd Largest Garden Show in The U.S. the “True Gardener’s Garden Show.”

Northwest Flower & Garden Show Speakers

C.L. Fornari The Garden Lady
Chris Beardshaw: One Hundred Plants That Almost Changed The World
Richie Steffan: Designing With Ferns
Kristin Green: Vintage Vogue
Kelly D. Norris: Plants With Style
Ciscoe Morris: That Can’t Grow Here
Debbie Teashon: Star of The Season Garden Party

26 Jan Solving Design Challenges With Style: Artistic Inspiration for Every Garden

Our next seminar category is about tricky design problems and how to solve them. You can be your own expert after dropping in on these seminars.

Along with the seminars above, this category contains some more garden superstars. Author Jenny Peterson will show how to introduce the trend “staycations” into your own yard with her seminar “Creating an Entertaining Garden: Outdoor Spaces for Connecting.

Stumped on how to combine plants properly? Brenda C. Adams can help with “Truly Compelling Combinations: Creating Sizzle and Subtlety.” She also will be speaking on “Having It All: Beauty and Low Maintenance” (which is possible!). 2016 NWFGS Show Judge Brian Minter can also share some combo advice in his seminar “The Art of Combination: Taking the Ordinary to the Extraordinary.”

Looking to design DIY? You’ll need to see NWFGS Garden Creator Phil Wood‘s seminar “Secrets of Garden Design: Solving Problems to Make a Great Garden” to help you transform unsightly views, bad neighbors, and many other common problems.

Chanticleer Garden is a renowned estate and garden in Pennsylvania. Horticulturalist Dan Benarcik has been with Chanticleer for 23 seasons and will be spilling insider secrets on how they keep the garden looking stunning in his seminars “Chanticleer: The Art of Gardening” and “Design Principles of the Chanticleer Pros For Home Gardeners.

Ever heard of “Carpet Gardening?” You have now. NWFGS Garden Creator Susan Calhoun will show you how to weave groundcovers into beautiful plant tapestries.

Solve all of your garden design problems in a matter of 45 minutes. You can find the full seminar schedule online… and remember, all of these seminars are completely FREE with your Northwest Flower & Garden Show ticket! -Courtney

The Rose Garden and Companion Proven Winner Plantings
The Rose Garden and Companion Proven Winner Plantings
 The Northwest Flower & garden Show demigraphics: 60,ooo attendees 4,100 followers on Twitter

 Advocates of Education from The American Rose Society President Pat Shanley and Past President, Jolene Adams

American Rose Society President, Pat Shanley, John DelVecheccio, and past ARS presidents. Jim Herring, Marilyn Wellan, and Jeff Wycoff
American Rose Society President, Pat Shanley, John DelVecheccio, and past ARS presidents. Jim Herring, Marilyn Wellan, and Jeff Wycoff as she is sworn in for her term as ARS president at the Fall convention in Syracuse, NY
American Rose Society Past President, Jolene Adams, Education Champion and Oz Osborn
American Rose Society Past President, Jolene Adams, and Oz Osborn

 

Jolene Adams, Rose Champion

Jolene Adams with Past ARS Presidents in San Diego

“Recognition is the Breakfast of Champions”

 

Jolene Adams with Past ARS Presidents in San Diego
American Rose Society Past Presidents from left to right Dr. Tommy Cairns, Jim Hering, current President Jolene Adams, Past Presidents Jeff Wyckoff, Steve Jones, Marilyn Welan, (the 2nd woman ever to be elected President of the ARS now Jolene Adams is the 3rd woman elected president of the ARS) And Vincent Gioia

If this saying is true, then the American Rose Society (ARS) has been fortunate to have had its fair share of Champions!  Now the latest person to assume the difficult and demanding role of Chief Executive Officer and President is Jolene Adams of Hayward, California. Here she is shown from left to right with American Rose Society Past Presidents Dr. Tommy Cairns, Jim Hering, Jeff Wyckoff, Steve Jones, Marilyn Welan (only the 2nd woman ever to be elected an ARS president, Jolene is the 3rd) and Vincent Gioia.

 

Roses By The Bay

 

Jolene Adams Awarding Susan Fox the ARS Presidential CitationSaturday, June 29th, I had the pleasure of meeting Jolene Adams for the very first time in person. She kindly invited me to the “Roses By The Bay” ARS North Central District Convention & Rose Show in Green Bay, Wisconsin, where little did I know I was to receive an “ARS Presidential Citation” for my work in promoting roses and encouraging membership through use of various social media.  Upon meeting Jolene for the very first time one’s impressions are of her laser-like piercing blue eyes and the charismatic power of her spirit.  Jolene Adams is undoubtedly a force for good!  She is the perfect role model for the world of roses!  She possesses a passion for roses in her heart, style in conversation, the compelling force of true conviction and a comfortable manner of delivery that people are naturally drawn to.

 

Jolene Adams, Computer Resources Manager, UC Berkeley

 

Jolene Adams at Home Depot 2012Jolene is all about education – education – education. It’s in her blood.  She was a manager and teacher by profession having served as the Computer Resources Manager for the College of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley.  In 2012 she was elected President of the American Rose Society, an 8000-member nationwide organization.   Jolene was also the inaugural Web Master for the American Rose Society initiating the site in 1995 and taking the ARS all the way into the ever-expanding world of social networking until 2009 when the site was “taken in-house.”

Jolene Adams at Dales Hardware 2012
Jolene Adams at Dales Hardware 2012

Believing that education is the road to growing good roses, she is an indefatigable force in lecturing and writing about roses! Inviting her audience to kneel down and get their fingers in the dirt are very successful techniques to motivate new growers.  After all – people come to her lectures to learn and become part of the total gardening experience. They love it and they adore Jolene Adams.

 

American Rose Magazine

 

Jolene Adams at San Diego
Jolene Adams, President of the American Rose Society at San Diego

She also believes that the award winning bimonthly American Rose magazine that reaches more than 8000 members is the most powerful forum to continue to educate and win hearts and minds to the enjoyment of growing roses.

 

Early in her term of office, Jolene appointed chairs for several ARS committees to help her in creating a themed editorial calendar that is cohesive with real content.  She has added columnists and writers who share their passion and rose knowledge, and Clippings, which is the best of the best from local society newsletters. One of the most exciting features in American Rose is the author from all over the world who contribute articles exclusively dedicated to roses.  This past issue guest author Prof. Akira Ogawa of the Japan Rose Society crafted a beautiful article on the devastating Tsunami and the loss of the Futaba Rose Gardens.

 

Jolene Adams at Hansen Park in Livermore, CA
Jolene Adams at Hansen Park in Livermore, CA, obviously a Green Bay Packers Fan 🙂

The ARS & You, Her Greatest Achievement

 

The ARS & You is perhaps one of her finest achievements.  Jolene appointed an editor & chair, Mary Hext and Sue Tiffany, to produce a topical 12-page electronic newsletter aimed at our local society members and consisting of coming attractions, news from ARS, reminders about ARS contests like the children’s essays and poetry, newsletter and bulletin competitions, photography competition and horticulture events to be held at the Shreveport headquarters of ARS. This outstanding publication is available to members and non-members alike and is a treasure trove of information.

 

It’s All About What YOU Do with Roses

 

Jolene believes knowledge through education and sharing are both the heart and soul of building the American Rose Society offering a myriad of activities to please all tastes such as:

How to Grow Beautiful Roses

Photographing Roses

Cooking with Roses

Landscaping With Roses

Accessorizing with Roses

Arrangements with Roses

Collecting Roses

 

Jolene Adams at Hansen Park Livermore, CA
Jolene Adams at Hansen Park Livermore, CA

Jolene, Rose Champion

 

What the rose world needs are many more champions like Jolene Adams.  You can sense her empathy right away.  With Jolene it’s not so much about her, its all about roses and helping people to do what they love better through education.  A riveting speaker, Jolene gave a wonderful presentation on her recent trip to South Africa for the Triennial World Rose Convention.  The audience was enthralled.  I want to be more like Jolene Adams and wish there were more people doing what she does; teaching people how easy it is to grow beautiful roses. I believe most everyone wants a rose garden and Jolene teaches as many people as possible that they can have one.  That’s why she’s a perfect role model and Champion of the Rose.