Easy To Love | Easy To Grow |Roses

Pretty Lady Rose
Pretty Lady Rose
Pretty Lady Rose

An Easy To Love |  Easy To Grow | Rose Garden

“Roses Are For Every Garden” at  The Chicago Flower & Garden Show, interview with

What Jodie Henke of Living the Country Life radio (a Meredith, Better Homes & Garden property) will air across the U.S., on

85% of folks say roses are their favorite flower. They want easy-to-grow roses. Rose breeders are listening to YOU! Each year there are better minimal care roses available that you can have great success with. Here are some of the  Conard Pyle Star Roses and Weeks Roses, that I researched and have personally grown. I included them because of their beauty and ease of care. Star Roses and Weeks Roses supplied the roses for the Chicago Flower & Garden rose garden his year and last year  had been planned to be at the show. They are minimal care roses bred for their easy to grow qualities. I can vouch for their high degree of success in the garden. Christian Bédard told us ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ may be the best rose he’s ever bred and I can tell you its at the top of my list for perfection.

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Hybrid Teas Roses | Americas Favorite Flower

Hybrid tea roses are perfect for any rose garden. They are perfect for cut flowers and creating our own bouquets. A hybrid tea is easily identifiable by their large shapely single flower blooms on long stems. Here are a few of the very best hybrid teas that are true winners.

‘Pretty Lady Rose’ New 2016 | Weeks Roses 2nd in their The Downton Abbey Series

  • Dark even rose pink almost fuchsia
  • 4-5 “ Large old fashioned ruffled petals
  • The smell of peonies with a hint of spices
'Francis Meilland'
‘Francis Meilland’

‘Francis Meilland’ 1996

  • Color: Very large shell pink flowers
  • Winter hardy disease resistant
  • Winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials Best Hybrid Tea
  • Strong fruity and citrusy fragrance
Award of Excellence Best Established Rose | Bred by Dr. Walter E. Lammerts (United States, 1954).
Award of Excellence Best Established Rose

‘Queen Elizabeth’ 1954

  • Pink 4” with large petals, and pointed buds
  • Moderate rose fragrance
  • Won ‘Best Established’ Rose at The Biltmore International Rose Trials when I was a judge in 2015

For Hedge and Borders I love Shrub roses because they grow from 5 to 15 feet in every direction based on your climate and growing conditions.

'Watercolors Homerun'
‘Watercolors Homerun’

‘Water Colors Home Run’ by Weeks Roses

  • 3 colors showy flame red | yellow gold pink blush | Hot Pink
  • Medium height and bloom size
  • Winter hardy and disease resistant
'Drift® Chamboeuf'
‘Drift® Chamboeuf’

‘Drift®’ Groundcover Roses by Star Roses and Plants

  • 8 colors from White Drift Rose to Red Drift Rose
  • Blooms 1 ½” -3” bushes about 2 feet tall spreading
  • Winter hardy, disease resistant, and easy to grow.
Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring in my Texas rose garden
Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring in my Texas rose garden

Bonica® – Shrub

  • The Bonica rose has been voted the World’s Favorite Rose in by the World Federation of Rose Societies and an All-America Winner
  • Pastel pink, 3” blossoms, about 5’ tall spreading
  • Slight fragrance

For containers you can plant Miniature or miniflora roses known for novelty and versatility.

Some of the most beautiful and hardy are:

'All a Twitter'
‘All a Twitter’

‘All a’ Twitter’

  • Twinkling brilliant orange
  • Tall, medium size blooms
  • Winter hardy

‘Be My Baby’

  • Incandescent pink
  • Large round blooms, medium tall
  • Fragrance mild tea 

‘Sunblaze®’ Miniatures by Star Roses and Plants

  • All colors from amber-to yellow, vigorous, disease resistant, winter hardy.
  • 12-18 inches compact
  • Slight fragrance

For walls, fences, and pergolas we want climbing or rambling type roses for their unique long arching canes, and their ability to climb fences, over walls, through trellises, arbors, trellises.

‘Above All’

  • The old classic ‘Westerland’ raised modernized with 21st century ‘best-off-best’ qualities!
  • Salmon-orange blend, repeat blooming, 10-14 feet
  • Old fashioned, 3 ½”-4” blooms, fruity fragrance
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush

‘4th of July’

  • Gorgeous Red striped and bright white
  • 10-14 feet canes
  • Fresh cut apple and & sweet rose fragrance

‘Pretty in Pink Eden’ or ‘New Dawn’ (Light pink)

  • All qualities of highest rated, award winning rose ‘Eden Climber’ also known as ‘Pierre de Ronsand’ only deep pink
  • 10-12’ with gorgeous very double blooms 70-80 petals
  • Vintage rose fragrance, vigorous and disease resistant 

Floribundas

Beautiful Roses for the garden known for their profusion of bloom are floribundas. They bear flowers in large clusters and trusses with large clusters of and trusses. This class is unrivaled for providing massive colorful lasting garden displays that are hardier, easy care and more reliable in wet weather than their hybrid tea counterpart.

'Bolero' blooming as a perfect heart in nature
‘Bolero’ blooming as a perfect heart in nature

‘Bolero’

  • White, large blooms with 100 petals
  • Old rose and spicy fragrance
  • Bushy and about 3 feet tall
'Julia Child' by Weeks Roses featured this shot of 'Julia Child' in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar
‘Julia Child’ by Weeks Roses featured this shot of ‘Julia Child’ in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar

‘Julia Child’

  • One of the top selling roses in the world
  • Butter/gold color, medium very full 3-4” blooms
  • Strong licorice fragrance
'Easy Does It' by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops, a vision of perfection
‘Easy Does It’ by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops

‘Easy Does It’

  • Gorgeous Mango Peach
  • Ever blooming with a moderate fragrance
  • Disease resistant, one of my all time favorites!  

Be sure and join us at The Chicago Flower and Garden Show. This is only the 2nd year we will have roses blooming in March in a rose garden setting in Chicago at Navy Pier. We’ll have American Rose Society Consulting Rosarians there to answer your rose growing questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You’ll Be Oso Happy® with Oso Easy® Roses! They’re Proven Winners!

o Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader as a beautiful border of color
Oso Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Speader, Above and Beyond
Oso Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader, Above and Beyond

This week I pruned my Oso Happy® with Oso Easy® Roses with the hedge clippers. My husband was tickled about it. The roses were in his way when he mowed. Now we shall have an English style prim and proper hedge of Oso Happy® with Oso Easy® roses in the fall to show you they are indestructible. Here’s the rotogravure of what the Proven Winner Oso Happy® with Oso Easy® rose bloom has looked like all year.

Oso Easy® Double Red Landscape Shrub
Oso Easy® Double Red Landscape Shrub

Today time and investment are factors that affect our decisions in everything we do. Most folks tell me I would have a rose garden if I had the time or roses weren’t so difficult to take care of.  Shannon Downey at Proven Winners had asked me to try something new; plant Proven Winners shrub roses in the fall. So I planted all the Oso Happy® and Oso Easy® roses in the fall of 2013 that same year I had also had the good fortune to meet Dr. David Zlesak at the Twin Cities Rose Club.

o Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader as a beautiful border of color
Proven Winners Oso Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader as a beautiful border of color

He has been doing remarkable work to develop winter hardy, disease resistant roses and roses that are resistant to just about every other hindrance that would keep folks from growing roses. Here’s his apricot climber, ‘Above And Beyond.’ Dr. Zlesak sent it to me to test grow it when I returned home. Many of the ‘Oso Happy’ roses were created by him as well. Winter hardy, disease resistant, they bloom like mad and you can prune them with the hedge clippers, they are real winners in every way.

Above And Beyond by David Zlesak | One of the most beautiful apricot climbers I have ever seen
Above And Beyond by David Zlesak | One of the most beautiful apricot climbers I have ever seen

This rose is spectacular.  I planted it in the fall along with all of these Proven Winner Oso Easy Roses that Shannon Downey sent me. We agreed to conduct our own test. I have never planted roses in the fall. It subsequently was the coldest winter in Illinois recorded weather history the winter of 2013. This is the second season for the Proven winner shrubs. Last winter the temps were were down to zero. I’m happy to report not one Oso Happy® or Oso Easy® rose was lost to the winter cold. Thank-you to Proven Winners for making these wonderful roses available to the world hybridized by world famous rose hybridizers all listed below: the Meilland Roses International and Chris Warner, UK. What amazingly wonderful plants they are. You truly can’t go wrong with these roses.

Series One: Oso Happy® roses
Oso Easy 'Smoothie' by Proven Winners
Oso Easy ‘Candy Oh!’ by Proven Winners

All bred by David Zlesak:  Oso Happy® Candy Oh!

Rosa Petite Pink by Dr. David Zlesak
Rosa Petite Pink by Dr. David Zlesak

  Oso Happy® Petit Pink

o Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader as a beautiful border of color
Proven Winners Oso Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader as a beautiful border of color

Oso Happy® Smoothie

Series Two: Oso Easy® roses
Varieties bred by Chris Warner, UK:
Oso Easy® Fragrant Spreader
Oso Easy® Honey Bun
Oso Easy® Honey Bun 

Oso Easy® Honey Bun

Oso Easy 'Italian Ice by Proven Winners
Oso Easy ‘Italian Ice by Proven Winners a rainbow tapestry of color.

Oso Easy® Italian Ice

Oso Easy® Lemon Zest
Oso Easy® Lemon Zest

Oso Easy® Lemon Zest

Oso Easy 'Mango Salsa' by Proven Winners captured in all the glory of a late fall bloom
Oso Easy ‘Mango Salsa’ by Proven Winners captured in all the glory of a late fall bloom

Oso Easy® Mango Salsa

Oso Easy 'Paprika' by Proven Winners captured in a late fall bloom.
Oso Easy ‘Paprika’ by Proven Winners captured in a late fall bloom.

  Oso Easy® Paprika

Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake
Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake

Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake

Varieties bred by the late Colin Horner, UK:
Oso Easy® Peachy Cream (Not Pictured)
Oso Easy® Strawberry Crush
Oso Easy® Strawberry Crush

Oso Easy® Strawberry Crush

Varieties developed by Meilland, France
Oso Easy®
Oso Easy® Cherry Pie

·         Oso Easy® Cherry Pie
·         Oso Easy® Double Red (new to retail 2015)*

*Thank-you to Shannon Springer of Proven Winners for providing this information

Here is a List of The Proven Winner Oso Happy® with Oso Easy® Roses! Roses. Its Interactive! Click To Vote If You Like The Rose, Add Your Own To The List!

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Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses

Here's a list of Proven Winner Oso Easy® Roses and Oso Happy® Shrub Roses that I've planted in Zone 6a in the fall and can verify that they are winter hardy, disease resistant, and have a rapid bloom cycle

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Happy Petit Pink

Oso Happy® Petite Pink Rosa blooms all through the summer. The color is fresh and lovely with a hint of yellow near the stamens to give a glowing affect to this precious little flower. Though a little gem that looks delicate it is as rugged as they come!

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Easy® Double Red

Oso Easy® Double Red is a prolific blooming minimal care beautiful, electric colorful shrub rose.

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Easy® Cherry Pie and Oso Happy® Smoothie

Oso Easy® Cherry Pie and Oso Happy® Smoothie form a beautiful colorful landscape border.

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Easy® Hone Bun

Oso Easy® Honey Bun, An orange bud that opens to a soft peach. Beautifully soft and lights up your landscape with peachy shades in-between.

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Easy® Cherry Pie, Paprika & Fragrant Spreader

borders, landscaping, shrubs, proven winners, colorful, photography, roses, flowers, hedges

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake

Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake will delight everyone with its delicious deep pink frosting like color!

Proven Winners Oso Easy® Roses | Above and Beyond

Above and Beyond an apricot climber hybridized by Dr. David Zlesak. Simply the prettiest Apricot climbing rose I ever saw.

 

 

 

Wordless Wednesday | A Hibiscus In The Rose Garden

Surprise! A hibiscus with the Little Red Barn!

Hibiscus and The Little Red Barn
Hibiscus and The Little Red Barn

The floribunda rose garden in its second full bloom cycle.

Floribundas in Bloom in July
The Illinois Floribunda Rose Garden is in its second full Bloom Cycle in July

‘Anna’s Promise’ by Weeks Roses with rain drops.

'AnnasPromise' with Rain Drops
‘AnnasPromise’ with Rain Drops

‘Watercolors Homerun’ debuting at #Cultivate15 in Ohio this week.

Watercolors Homerun Knocks it Out of the Park
Watercolors Homerun Knocks it Out of the Park

‘Pink Cupcake’ one of Proven Winners Oso Easy Series of roses.

I just pruned all of them with the hedge clippers that’s how easy they are. I will have a hedge of roses for fall.

Oso Easy 'Pink Cupcake'
Oso Easy ‘Pink Cupcake’

‘Veteran’s Honor’ the morning of the 4th of July. 

Veterans Honor with rain drops in full sun at sun rise
Veterans Honor with rain drops in full sun at sun rise on the 4th of July

‘Love & Peace’ Pictures worth a thousand words. #WordlessWednesday

Love & Peace is simply glorious
Love & Peace is simply glorious

Four Seasons of Roses

Gaga's Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover 'Moonstone'

Garden Legends Live On By Designs & Impressions They Leave on The Earth | Our Hearts and Minds

Gaga's Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover 'Moonstone'
Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover ‘Moonstone’

Gaga’s Garden Calendar of Roses represents a dream come true. What’s so special about this calendar? Here’s the back story: When my picture of a spray of ‘Julia Child’ was chosen for the American Rose Society calendar in 2014, folks asked me, “why don’t you do your own rose calendar?”

Julia Child
Julia Child

So I present you Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015. It includes roses like ‘Elle’, for the month of April, a rose near and dear to my heart. I planted ‘Elle’ when my granddaughter Gabrielle was born. She now has a little sister named Ella, so now its doubly meaningful to me. People tell me they want roses that are named for or remind them of themselves, friends, family members or celebrities all the time, and ask me to assist them in their search to locate them. The names of roses in the garden are always a topic for conversation on garden tours. So you see rose names matter.

'Elle' featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,
‘Elle’ featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,

 

A rose is an argument. It proclaims the triumph of beauty over brutality, of gentleness over violence, of the ephemeral over the lasting, and of the universal over the particular. The same rose bursts into bloom on the North Cape and in the Sahara Desert.”~Alain Meilland

 

Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog
Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog

Over the years people have taught me that a garden says so much about who we are. A rose garden can give one a venue of remembrance, an outlet for stress, a show place for photography, a sorcerers delight for alchemy, a veritable rainbow of colors, and a tapestry of fragrance so deep it touches the soul. The delight and knowledge I’ve gained through conversations about names of roses has continued to inspire me. Roses offer a way to softly gain access to the five senses in the garden that then gently whisper thoughts of life and our loved ones worth remembering that only a walk in a rose garden can inspire. Listen and let the garden speak to us. Let us count the ways on your calendar of Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015 . Happy New Year! Click on this link to buy the calendar. Happy New Year!

Don’t forget 10% of profits are donated to the American Rose Society.

The Rose Garden
The Rose Garden

Rainbow Colors of Love

Erik my beautiful boy with Downs Syndrome and 'Europeana' in the garden
Star Roses Apricot Drift Chosen by The Girls for Their Mother
Star Roses Apricot Drift Chosen by The Girls for Their Mother

“I love you more than rainbow colors,” Ella said to me with her arms around my neck. Her sweet precious breath whispered softly in my ear. What could possibly evoke love that brings about a heart melting statement that dreams are made of. I’ve thought about it a lot. Or one day while I was bent over a computer key board someone began to gently rub my neck. I felt a current pass through me so real that I thought to my self who could possibly love me this much? My son had brought my eldest granddaughter to work and I had not heard her soft approach.

Kids at the 'Zoo'
Kids at the ‘Zoo’

Upon careful reflection I believe a child’s love is magical. It grows from the little tiny precious nuggets of time spent together. How easy it is to make little children happy.

Planting A Basket for Mom | The Little Ones Adore Big Sister
Planting A Basket for Mom | The Little Ones Adore Big Sister

We were going to see the babies. I said “Ella make your list of things you would like to do when Pa and I get there to see you.” She said to her Mama and Daddy, “do you think Pa and Gaga would ever take me back to that pet store that Gabi calls the Kitty cat store?”

Babies and Puppies
Babies and Puppies

Here’s Ella Claire’s 4-year-old Baby Bucket List:

  • Go to the pet shop
  • Ride the carousel at the mall
  • Play at the McDonald’s Play Play place
  • Go Shoe shopping
Erik my beautiful boy with Downs Syndrome and 'Europeana' in the garden
Erik my beautiful boy with Downs Syndrome and ‘Europeana’ in the garden

On our visit we fulfilled her bucket list and that of the other kids. We were headed back to the house with all three of the kids. We asked everyone what was his or her favorite part of our day. Gabi said “the carousel,” Ella said “the carousel.” Erik our beautiful grandson who has Down’s Syndrome said, “going to get ice cream.” We hadn’t gone to get ice cream yet. 😉 You guessed it. We then went to get ice cream.

Fox Girls | "Gaga, you can fly on a bird to do the laundry," Ella Claire
Fox Girls | “Gaga, you can fly on a bird to do the laundry,” Ella Claire

More than riches more than gold here are the blessings that melt my heart into “ice cream puddles.”

You too can have your heart melted. Its easy. During the holidays choose an angel from the angel tree at the mall. Ask at your local churches or your town hall about families that may need a little extra help and could use some toys for Christmas. In the community where we live the churches assist seniors with Christmas lights and adopt families to get presents for the children.

For fulfilling the dreams of a four old here are her original quotes, we’ve been told that she loves us more than:

Headline for Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes:
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Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes:

Here's a list of love quotes from my four year old grand-daughter

1

“I love you more than ice cream puddles.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than ice cream puddles.”
2

“Gaga. I love you more than Chinese food-pizza, and pasta spaghetti.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “Gaga. I love you more than Chinese food-pizza, and pasta spaghetti.”

Ummmm, yummy!

3

“I love you more than the zoo.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than the zoo.”

Kids at the 'Zoo'

4

“I love you more than the pet shop.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than the pet shop.”
5

“I love you more than McDonalds.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than McDonalds.”
6

“I love you and Pa more than my birthday.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you and Pa more than my birthday.”
7

“I love you more than music.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than music.”
8

“I love you more than starlight and moonbeams.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than starlight and moonbeams.”
9

“I love you more than a movie with popcorn.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than a movie with popcorn.”
10

“I love you more than going at a place to the beach.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than going at a place to the beach.”
11

“I love you more than going for a walk on a rainbow day.”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than going for a walk on a rainbow day.”

Rainbow Sorbet

12

“I love you more than sliding down a rainbow on a cloud”

Nov 06, 2014
Baby Bucket List Fulfilled Evoked These Love Quotes: | “I love you more than sliding down a rainbow on a cloud”

Listly is an Interactive List. Please vote and/Or add your own

Love Planted A Rose Garden | June Is National Rose Month

June Spring Bloom | The Floribunda Rose Garden in Full Bloom

“Love planted a rose and the world turned sweet ” ~

Katherine Lee Bates

June Spring Bloom | The Floribunda Rose Garden in Full Bloom
June Spring Bloom | The Floribunda Rose Garden in Full Bloom

Floribunda Rose Garden in Bloom

June was declared National Rose Month by Ronald Reagan in 1986.

The Northeastern Illinois Rose Society was proud to play a role in having the rose named America’s floral emblem while Don Ballin was the President of the American Rose Society (ARS). I was on the board of the Northeastern Illinois Rose Society at the time. It was a historic moment, captured for the world to see, when our Northeastern Illlinois President Don Ballin was with President Reagan as he signed the proclamation making the rose the national flower. Don Ballin is pictured below with President Reagan (far right) as he signed the legislation.

The National Flower In 1985, the United States Senate passed a resolution asking the president to declare the rose as the national floral emblem. On November 20th, 1986, then president Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation certifying the rose as the national flower in a ceremony at the White House Rose Garden. The National Rose Garden is committed to honoring this national symbol as a reflection of our broader landscape. (Image: American Rose Society)

President Ronald Reagan signing Proclamation 5574, November 20, 1986 (Image: American Rose Society)

 Biltmore Rose Trials ‘Miracle On The Hudson’ by Robert Neal Rippetoe | Best Shrub | Most Disease Resistant | Best Growth Habit | Best Overall Winner | May 24, 2014. I was a judge at the International #BiltmoreRose Trails at the Biltmore Estate last week-end in Ashville, NC. Paul Zimmerman author of Everday Roses and Consultant to the Biltmore Estate conducts the Trials along with Lucas Jack and his Team each year.
'Miracle On The Hudson' By Robert Neal Rippetoe | @FrancisRoses | Best Shrub | Most Disease Resistant | Best Growth Habit | Overall Winner
‘Miracle On The Hudson’ By Robert Neal Rippetoe | @FrancisRoses | Best Shrub | Most Disease Resistant | Best Growth Habit | Overall Winner

Across the nation there are rose shows and gardens open that you can take your family and enjoy the beauty of the first bloom all through the month of June and of course the entire summer.  I encourage you to go to the gardens across the country. Here’s just a few of the blooms that are spectacular in the garden this week. It’s been a cool & wet spring in Central Illinois but it is still a breathtaking first cycle of bloom.

PR Web even Lists 12 Fun Facts about roses:

Did you know 85% of American say the rose is their favorite flower?

FUN FACT 1: The White House is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Rose Garden this year. In 1913 Ellen Wilson, wife of President Woodrow Wilson, replaced a colonial garden established by First Lady Edith Roosevelt in 1902.

FUN FACT 2: In 1986 President Ronald Reagan signed Proclamation 5574, which made the rose the National Floral Emblem. The document contained these words: “More often than any other flower, we hold the rose dear as the symbol of life and love and devotion, of beauty and eternity.”

FUN FACT 3: Roses are the official flower of the District of Columbia, as well as the states of Georgia, Iowa, New York and North Dakota.

FUN FACT 4: President George Washington bred roses.

FUN FACT 5: The rose is the favorite flower of 85 percent of Americans.

FUN FACT 6: Thousands of songs have been sung about roses, including, “Red Roses for a Blue Lady,” “Ramblin’ Rose,” “My Wild Irish Rose,” “Everything’s Comin’ Up Roses,” “Yellow Rose of Texas,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” and, of course, “Mama Liked the Roses,” a song recorded by Elvis Presley in 1969.

FUN FACT 7: A fossilized imprint of a rose was discovered in Florissant, CO. Its estimated age: about 40 million years old.

FUN FACT 8: In Indiana, the fourth week of June has been designated as “A Rose for Friendship Week.”

FUN FACT 9: William Shakespeare referred to roses more than 50 times, including, “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

FUN FACT 10: The War of the Roses was a face-off between two families who wanted to control England: The House of Lancaster, which used a red rose on its family crest, and the House of York, whose symbol was a white rose.

FUN FACT 11: The Tournament of Roses began in 1890 as a festival. In 1902, a football game was added for entertainment.

FUN FACT 12: Red roses became the official flower of the Kentucky Derby in 1904. The phrase “Run for the Roses” was first used in 1925.

Bouquet of 'Honorine de Brabant' Best Establish Rose, A Bourban
Bouquet of ‘Honorine de Brabant’ Best Establish Rose, A Bourbon Rose

‘Honorine de Brabant’ winner of Best Established Rose at The Biltmore Rose Trails

THE NATIONAL ROSE GARDEN
HONORING THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE
The National Flower
In 1985, the United States Senate passed a resolution asking the president to declare the rose as the national floral emblem. On November 20th, 1986, then president Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation certifying the rose as the national flower in a ceremony at the White House Rose Garden. The National Rose Garden is committed to honoring this national symbol as a reflection of our broader landscape.
President Ronald Reagan signing Proclamation 5574, November 20, 1986
UNITED STATES SENATE RESOLUTION The flower commonly known as the rose is designated and adopted as the national floral emblem of the United States of America, and the President of the United States is authorized and requested to declare such fact by proclamation.Title 36, Chapter 10, §187
United States Code Proclamation No. 5574. The Rose Proclaimed the National
Floral Emblem of the United States of AmericaProc. No. 5574. Nov. 20, 1986, 51 F.R. 42197, provided:
Americans have always loved the flowers with which God decorates our land. More often than any other flower, we hold the rose dear as the symbol of life and love and devotion, of beauty and eternity. For the love of man and woman, for the love of mankind and God, for the love of country, Americans who would speak the language of the heart do so with a rose.
We see proofs of this everywhere. The study of fossils reveals that the rose has existed in America for age upon age. We have always cultivated roses in our gardens. Our first President, George Washington, bred roses, and a variety he named after his mother is still grown today. The White House itself boasts a beautiful Rose Garden. We grow roses in all our fifty States. We find roses throughout our art, music, and literature. We decorate our celebrations and parades with roses. Most of all, we present roses to those we love, and we lavish them on our altars, our civil shrines, and the final resting places of our honored dead.
The American people have long held a special place in their hearts for roses. Let us continue to cherish them, to honor the love and devotion they represent, and to bestow them on all we love just as God has bestowed them on us.
The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 159 [Pub.L. 99.449, Oct. 7, 1986, 100 Stat. 1128, which enacted this section], has designated the rose as the National Floral Emblem of the United States and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation declaring this fact.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, RONALD REAGAN, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the rose as the National Floral Emblem of the United States of America.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eleventh.
RONALD REAGAN

Planning A Spring Rose Garden

Gene Boerner Magnificent Floribunda, 2013 spring bloom
Gene Boerner Magnificent Floribunda, 2013 spring bloom
Gene Boerner Magnificent Floribunda, 2013 spring bloom

Growing roses can be easy.

Most gardeners tell me they want a rose garden. Time constraints today demand easy steps to see quick results and the considerable cost that we invest in our gardens require lasting success.

Floribunda Rose Garden Before
Floribunda Rose Garden Before

When asked why they don’t grow roses most people tell me they think roses are difficult to grow. When asked 85% of people say roses are their favorite flower. Why don’t they grow them? They believe roses are too difficult to grow. Growing roses can be as easy or as complex as you want it to be.

Let’s dispel the misconception that roses are difficult to grow by planning a path to successfully establish your rose garden so that you can enjoy the pleasure and the beauty, fragrance and joy of walking through and photographing your very own rose garden, the Queen of flowers.

First decide what you want to do with your roses and the type of roses you want to grow. Be sure you have 6-8 hours of full sun, a source of water and you are half way there. I also posted this project on Hometalk.com the largest home and garden social network where you can find countless ideas whether you are a novice or an expert gardener. You can also read How To Plant A Bare Root Rose, and A Rose Pruning Primer for other rose tips.

Here are ways to enjoy roses:

Landscaping with Roses

Garden in the Summertime
Garden in the Summertime

Rose Photography

Julia Child Spray
Julia Child Spray

Rose Accessorizing

Dried roses from my garden aphotography of garden roses
Dried roses from my garden and photography of garden roses

Flower Arranging

Arrangement by District Director, Linda Kimmel

Rose Collections

Double Delight, Another Reason To Love Her
Double Delight, Another Reason To Love Her

Extension of Interior Décor

Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring
Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring in my Texas rose garden

Showing Roses

Tempo Climbing Rose Bush Entry National Trophy Winner
Tempo Climbing Rose Bush Entry National Trophy Winner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Types of Roses, Available in Every Color Under the Sun 

Moonstone in Gaga's Garden with Rain
Moonstone in Gaga’s Garden with Rain

HT Hybrid teas, large shapely blooms on a single stem with 30-50 petals

 

 

Ch-Ching, Appropriate for The Growing Profitability of The Gardening and Landscape Business
Gold Medal, Appropriate for The Growing and Ever Blooming Profitability of The Gardening and Landscape Business

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grandifloras Clusters & trusses of roses with characteristics of a hybrid tea

 

 

Betty Boop, floribunda
Betty Boop, floribunda

 

 

 

 

F Massive, long lasting garden displays rapid bloom cycles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All A Twitter Candelabra
All A Twitter Candelabra

Miniatures edging beds, containers indoor gardens, as a perennial versatilityunrivaled

Amazing Knock-Out RadRaz
Amazing Knock-Out Landscape Shrub, Minimal Care RadRazShrubs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shrubs: Knock-Out Roses Minimal care landscape roses and Drift Roses

 

Stormy Weather, Large Flowered Climber
Stormy Weather, Large Flowered Climber

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climbers, arching canes, ability to train over walls, trellises, arbors, pagodas. Flowers in wide variety of forms, colors and shapes.

Be sure to visit Hometalk to get ideas for every kind of garden you can imagine. You can also follow @hometalk on Twitter and search #springgardening for ideas on your new rose garden.

Why I wrote Four Seasons of Roses A Year Long Guide To Help You Grow Beautiful Roses

Why I Wrote Four Seasons of Roses

Julia Child
New floribunda rose garden bed in planning stage, non-elevated, eastern exposure
New floribunda rose garden bed in planning stage, non-elevated, eastern exposure

Necessity…the mother of invention ~ Plato

Necessity is why I wrote Four Seasons of Roses 2014 Monthly Guide to Rose Care.  Everyone that visits my rose garden tells me that they want roses.  I ask them “what’s standing between you and the object of your desire?” The answer is always the same. “I think roses are too hard to grow.” Then they ask me if I “will teach them how to grow roses?” Let me tell you 3 short stories of how Four Seasons of Roses came to be.

 

Gene Boerner Magnificent Floribunda, 2013 spring bloom
Gene Boerner Magnificent Floribunda, 2013 spring bloom

Education is the Key to Growing Roses

I was working for the Fine Jewelers Guild, owned by the Zale Corporation in Irving, Texas. Roses are a topic that people like to talk about when they see rose bouquets that I bring to the office or they stop by to see my rose garden. The vice president of the division at the time loved roses and said to me “I will put in a rose garden if you can make it easy.” I said to him “roses are easy, people can be difficult.” That’s when I wrote my first one-page easy instruction sheet for him that I called Rapid-Fire Results with Roses. I said to him, “if you do exactly what this tells you to do you will have a beautiful rose garden.” During this same time I was asked to speak to the Dallas Master Gardeners about roses and the Plano Master Gardener group on growing roses. The brochure Rapid Fire Results with Roses, had to be re-printed and distributed 100’s and 100’s of times and it wasn’t quite sufficient for a beginner’s needs.

 

Karen & Carrie
Karen & Carrie

Rosarian Apprentices

My dear friends and neighbors wanted to put in their own rose gardens.

In planning their new rose garden the first thing we determined was location. Each of us has a special window that we spend more time viewing the landscape, this is a good place to put a rose garden if it has 6-8 hours of sunlight. Next we talked about color palette. One of my rose garden apprentices didn’t care for the traditional red rose and loved oranges, peach and tangerine colored roses so that’s the basis of the rose garden color palette for her garden. Rapid bloom cycle and lots of blooms were important so we chose floribundas. Before I knew it I had three rosarian apprentices with rose gardens. And I was doing the pruning for a local middle school rose garden.  A handy guide Like Four Seasons of Roses would be the perfect hand-out for my apprentice gardeners.

 

Wanda
Wanda, Dedicated Blackspot Eradicator

Wanda’s Rose Garden

Friends at work have always let me know they also want rose gardens and need instructions on pruning. Here’s the story of my dear friend Wanda who bought a home out in the country and also wanted a rose garden. We started with the basic planning of adding soil amendments because of clay soil conditions and then choosing the plants she wanted based on color, and rating after I explained how the American Rose Society Handbook of Rating Roses rating system works. I explained that I usually do not buy a rose that is rated below 7.0 and for good reason.So you see I know people want to have a rose garden and I wanted to create an educational, easy to follow guide filled with possibilities. I’m committed to getting knowledge into the hands of people that want roses.

Four Seasons of Roses 2014 Monthly Guide to Rose Care is a garden planner that also features my own photography because many of you have asked me to publish the pictures I take since Julia Child

Julia Child
Julia Child

was included in the American Rose Society 2014 calendar. I also included a place to take notes since I always make notes every time I go to the garden. A historical reference helps me grow better roses. Whether you grow roses for photography, landscaping, accessorizing, arranging, collecting or cooking I know you will enjoy my Four Seasons of Roses 2014 Monthly Guide | 2014 Monthly Guide to Rose Care Garden Planner.

 

Wallace Gardens GiveAway: Four Seasons of Roses & Alfalfa Tea

Four Seasons of RosesWallace Gardens is doing a promotional giveaway of Four Seasons of Roses | 2014 Monthly Guide to Rose Care and Alfalfa Tea Soil Conditioner by Annie Haven @GreenSoil of www.manuretea.com. Nancy Wallace, @SassyNancy, is a Garden Artisan and creator of original container gardens from beautiful Wallace Gardens. Nancy lives in the Atlanta area and posts pictures of her original gardening creations on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.  Here’s the details to win. Thank-you for all of your support of the gardening community Nancy!

Here’s all you have to do for a chance to win. Simply click like on this picture on Pinterest or if you don’t have a Pinterest account click this link for details on her Web site. 

WallacePlease check Nancy’s Web site Wallace Gardens and www.facebook.com/WallaceGardens for additional details.

Best of Luck!

 

 

Heritage Garden Viola Pyramids, Guest Post by Tom Soulsby, Senior Horticulturist Chicago Botanic Garden

Finished-Pansy-Pyramids by Tom Soulsbey

 

Chicago Botanic Gardens October 2, 2013
Chicago Botanic Gardens October 2, 2013

The Chicago Botanic Garden is a treasure along the the north shore of Lake Michigan. For my visit to talk with Senior Horticulturist, Tom Soulsby about the Krasberg Rose Garden the weather was a perfect 72 degrees and the sun had taken on the quality that you see only in the fall; longer shadows and winds beginning to whisper in the few leaves that have begun to meander their way to the forest bed. Upon entry to the garden one of the first flower displays you see is a pyramid of electrifying color. Within 5 minutes of talking with Tom he explained creating the Viola Pyramids and great designs like it are his first love. He also explained that he had written a post all about building the Viola Pyramid on his blog. I asked Tom if he would be willing to share the amazing story of how to create such a wonderment on this Web site.This is a re-post of how Tom Soulsby and his team at The Chicago Botanic Gardens built the Viola Pyramids. I want to thank Julie McCaffrey, publicist at The Chicago Botanic Gardens for all of her assistance as well. ~Susan Fox

A 500-hour behind-the-scenes look at the Viola Pyramid 2013 fall display
by Tom Soulsby

Pansy for Pyramids
Pansy for the Pyramid

My summer intern, Melanie Jensen (now a senior studying horticulture at Southern Illinois University), has always wondered how botanic gardens put together their impressive seasonal displays. In fact, she was so intrigued by them that she did her final presentation—a graduation requirement for the Garden’s horticulture internship program—on the complexities and challenges of preparing these displays.

 

To say the work is complex and challenging is almost an understatement. Sometimes our work here seems like magic. Overnight, the Garden can transform from spring to summer or summer to fall. Yesterday there were spring troughs, summer palm trees, or fall mum towers in the Garden. Today, there is something completely different. Yes, it does seem like it happens just like that, perhaps with the snap of a finger. But behind the scenes, for months or even years before most visitors get to see a display, a team is already hard at work making it happen.

Finished-Pansy-Pyramids by Tom Soulsbey
Finished-Pansy-Pyramids by Tom Soulsby

Melanie and more than 50 other staff and volunteers had a front row seat this summer to help me create this fall’s signature display in the Heritage Garden—the Viola pyramids, which are now on display. The pyramids themselves are really just a set of simple flowers presented in a very unique way. The story could end right there, but what I think makes this display fascinating to people like me and Melanie (and hopefully to you, too) is the astonishing amount of work it takes to get the pyramids from concept to finished product.

The Garden began working on this project more than a year ago, when outdoor floriculturist Tim Pollak and I were brainstorming on how we could use the pyramids in another display. Last used about five years ago, the pyramids have traditionally been used as a summer display component, planted with two cultivars of Alternanthera. Pressed to take a fresh approach to the pyramids, we settled on the idea that they would make a great fall display. We considered using mums (too fragile, and many growing challenges) and Verbena (not frost-tolerant enough for fall), and concluded that Viola were our best option. Others agreed.

Saying we are creating Viola pyramids is the easy part. Actually doing it is a completely different story, and it’s a testament to great project planning and teamwork at the Garden.

Here’s what it took:

1. Our production team grew 6,400 Viola plants, half orange and half purple, so they were ready for planting into the pyramid structure by early August. The pyramids are 9 feet wide at the base, and 10 feet tall at the apex. Panels lined with landscape fabric

Panels lined with landscape fabric

2. In the meantime, Melanie and I led the team to prepare the pyramid frames. Working in the nursery, our first step was to attach landscape fabric to the front face of the pyramids using hundreds of zip ties. Landscape fabric helps hold the soil and the plants in the frame. We had to be very careful that the fabric covered every nook and cranny of the frame. If not, soil would leak from the frame, and it would undermine the integrity of the entire planting space. Filling the panels with custom-blended planting media

Filling the panels with custon blended planting media

3. Next we custom-blended special planting media, using lightweight potting soil and perlite. The pyramids retain water differently at their tops versus their bottoms, so we changed the composition of the media throughout the frame to accommodate this variance. Near the top of the pyramid we used a heavier, more water-retentive blend of about 70 percent soil and 30 percent perlite. At the bottom, where there is a risk that the pyramid could become waterlogged, we created a lightweight mix that was about 30 percent soil and 70 percent perlite. You can see in the picture how the soil/perlite composition changes from top to bottom. Soaker hoses weave throughout the frame

panel with hose

4. Most of the time we will water the pyramids with a hose and water nozzle, but sometimes we need to give them a deeper soaking, especially on hot and sunny days. To help with that, we weaved soaker hoses throughout the frame so that we could water from the inside out.

Intern Melanie Jensen prepping the panels

Intern Melanie Jensen prepping the panels

5. To make the pyramids lighter (each individual panel weighs about 500 pounds—meaning each pyramid weighs 2,000 pounds), and to reduce the amount of soil and perlite needed, we stuffed sheets of foam insulation into the bottom of the frame. A mesh screen secured all of these materials inside the frame.

Deadheading the viola panels

Deadheading the Viola panels

6. Time to plant! We cut tiny holes into the landscape fabric and inserted a Viola plant. As we planted, we also pinched and deadheaded each and every Viola. During the critical first few weeks of growing in the pyramids, the Viola plants need to spend their energy developing roots and spreading foliage to cover the entire frame, rather than producing flowers. Removing all of the flowers is a hard thing to swallow, but it’s really for the best long-term interest of the display.

(Incidentally, the cut flowers were put to good use, donated to our Roadside Flower Sale team. Pressed flowers are sold at their annual sale, with proceeds supporting Garden initiatives, including generous funding for the horticulture department.)

PHOTO: Giant planted triangles of blooming violas in the nursery.

The Violas doing what they do best: blooming again

7. The original plan was to leave the Viola plants simply to grow as-is under the care of our great production team until they were display-ready in mid-September. However, Mother Nature had other plans. The weather caused the Viola to grow faster than expected, and by late August it became clear that we would need to do another round of deadheading. Staff and volunteers again converged in the nursery for two days of meticulous work removing every flower head and seedpod from the display. It was a lot of work, and a little disconcerting to again make a beautifully colorful pyramid all green and flowerless, but it was an important task so the Viola could flower prolifically later into the season.

PHOTO: A team of 12 people (and a forklift driver) place a panel in the Heritage Garden.

Lifting a panel into place in the Heritage Garden

8. Time to move to the Heritage Garden! It took 15 strong groundskeepers, some extra machinery and ropes, a lot of creative thinking, and 1½ days of hard work to move the pyramids from the Nursery to the Heritage Garden. Come by and take a look!

I often like to break down the numbers for a project, because it articulates the scope of work in a way that words cannot. So, here are some numbers for this project: Over one year of planning, more than 50 people involved, 6,400 plants used, and more than 500 hours of labor to get the job done. Yes, 500 hours!

It seems like a lot of work—and it is—but I hope that everyone who sees the display takes away something uniquely personal to them. Perhaps it sparks your creativity on how to use simple plants in unique ways. Maybe seeing something new and special triggers your passion for plants and horticulture, either as a hobby or as a career. Sometimes the display will draw your attention to a part of the Garden that you never explored before now. Or maybe you like it just because it looks pretty cool. It’s even O.K. if this display just isn’t your thing: artistic choices are very personal. Whatever your take-away is, however, my hope is that we can use this display and others like it to engage you in a conversation about plants and to help you connect to the Garden in an exciting new way. That makes 500 hours of work worth it for me.

Enjoy!

Tom Soulsby, senior horticulturist at the Chicago Botanic Garden
Tom Soulsby, senior horticulturist at the Chicago Botanic Garden

Tom Soulsby is a senior horticulturist at the Chicago Botanic Garden and is directly responsible for the Krasberg Rose and Heritage Gardens, as well as the Linden Allee. He also supervises several other Garden areas. Tom also performs landscape and design work for private businesses and residences throughout the Chicago area. Prior to pursuing his lifelong passion and sharing his love for gardening with others, Tom was a successful business professional with nearly 20 years of corporate and small business experience. Tom holds a B.S. in Business Management and Administration from Bradley University. He is also a graduate of the Joseph Regenstein, Jr. School of the Chicago Botanic Garden, where he received his formal horticulture education.

 

 

Signs of Spring and How To Plant A Bare Root Rose

Signs of Spring Daffodils

“It seems that Canadian Geese are one of the most followed bird groups in the US. Their overhead migrations are a sure sign of the changing of the seasons.”  ~ Lisa Shea

Canadian Honker in Flight
Canadian Honker in Flight

Nothing can lull us into thinking we have plenty of time to get ready for spring than the heater running full blast and a few snow flurries swirling around. I was idly starring out the window when what to my wandering eyes should appear? No! Not a miniature sleigh and eight tiny reindeer. Hundreds if not thousands of majestic Canadian Honkers flying in their classic V-shaped formation due north signaling the transition from winter to spring. And their haunting sound echoing across the cold, brown corn fields of Illinois. Guess what can hurl me out of my winter doldrums faster than a jet propelled water slide? That’s right! Canadian honkers on their way back to what we are thinking is still the frozen tundra. Images of icebergs floating in Lake Michigan appeared in my mind and I think “what’s the deal with these geese?”

Don’t they know its still winter? It was -8º the other day. Do they know something I don’t? Obviously they do. They know spring is just around the corner and they don’t want to be caught in the wrong zone at the wrong time of year. What are three sure signs that spring is not far off in northern climates? Canadian Honkers heading north, the first robin and little crocuses peaking out of melting snow.

Signs of Spring Daffodils
Signs of Spring Daffodils in The Little Ranch Across The Street

 

Tell Your Local Independent Garden Center (IGC) The Roses You Want

Listen, many folks who order roses for Independent Garden Centers (IGC) order what they feel is the ‘safe bet’ and only order traditional roses that they think will sell. And then they only carry a limited number of popular varieties like ‘Mr. Lincoln’, ‘Peace’, or ‘Queen Elizabeth’, and KnockOuts®. Lovely as they are, what if you want ‘Neil Diamond’, ‘Julia Child’, ‘Francis Meilland’ or Sunblaze® Miniature Roses? Will your IGC have them? If the person ordering roses, as they say, “doesn’t know roses” which 9 times out of ten is the case, sometimes they just go down the Weeks Roses and the Star Roses order guide and choose roses based on names they like. I know this for a fact based on my investigations. My suggestion is that you learn who places orders for roses at your favorite Independent Garden Centers (IGC); after identifying roses you want from studying the Star Roses and Plants, and Weeks Roses online catalog or any of the catalogs below then ask them to order these roses for you. But you have to do this a season ahead of when you want these roses. If you are a Consulting Rosarian work with the ordering department of your local IGC to order roses based on the American Rose Society’s Handbook for Selecting Roses rating system.

Let’s talk about what needs to be well underway for your spring rose garden. If you are in the country and cannot count on running down to your local well-stocked nursery and IGC,  that has many of the roses you see pictures of all winter on the Internet that sell roses in 3-5 gallon potted containers then you need to have placed your orders from your favorite rose catalog listed below so your bare root rose will arrive after the last hard freeze for your USDA plant hardiness zone.

Roses that will be at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show

Have you been dreaming  and planning from the selection of what you see in the magnificent Star Roses and Plants online catalog and the Weeks Roses Catalog or one of the catalogs listed below, then you better get used to the ease of ordering and planting a bare root rose. Because the roses you want may only be available from the mail order suppliers. Here are my favorite must have catalogs for selecting the most beautiful roses today. Several of the catalog sellers of roses are offering free shipping if you order through the end of February. You Pinterest fans there is no better place to start pinning then the list of online catalogs I have just linked you to below. Let the pinning begin. But better yet rather than pin roses why not plant some bare root roses. It’s easy.

Weeks Roses 2013

Star Roses 2013

Certified Roses, Inc.

Proven Winners (Oso Easy Landscape Roses)

For Love of Roses (Miniature Roses)

Weeks Roses And Star Roses are wholesaler’s. Here’s how to enhance your rose shopping experience, you could go to the online wholesale catalogs to identify the roses you want then locate a supplier who has the rose you have identified then order it if you cannot locate it your garden center. You need to get a move on. As of the first week in April I am still receiving email offers for free shipping, etc. on orders over $100.00, etc. so you can call to see if there are special offers going on.

Planting A Bare Root Rose

I want you to feel confident planting a bare root rose so I am going to go over planting and care of a bare root rose. First identify your Plant Hardiness Zone. I am in planting zone 5b according to PlantMaps and  according to USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map I am in zone 6a. Most shippers of plants will ask you your zip code and identify your plant hardiness zone so they will ship to you in after the last possible chance of a hard freeze. If you receive your plants early you can plant them in pots.

Some of our savvy rose friends plant them in pots and let them harden by placing them in their green houses. I have bought potted roses and hardened them by taking them inside the warmer garage each night and taken them out in the sunshine until they acclimate to cooler temperatures than the greenhouses they just came from. However, let’s talk about what I did with the bare root roses I received early.

Look for and expect grade 1 roses:

Unpacking Bare Root Roses

  • It’s key that you unpack them immediately
  • Most shippers include very good instructions with their roses
  • Your new bare root rose should never be allowed to become dry.
  • Immediately place your roses in a large bucket of water
  • I used Haven Brands Moo-Poo Tea to soak my roses

Planting

  •  Before planting, broken or dead roots and stems may be gently pruned.
  • Now dig a hole large enough and properly shaped for each rose on 2 ½ to 3-foot centers.
  • Minor pruning of long roots is fine as well.
  • Prepare the mound in the bottom of the hole that allows the roots to be draped around it. This provides a firm base for the plant and minimizes captured air. The mound should be a height that would allow the bud union to set at ground level. While no fertilizer is used in the planting process, a cup of bone meal can be mixed in the bottom of the hole and in the mounded cone as well and I add plenty of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss.

After arranging the roots around the cone, cover the roots with a small amount of soil and check the plant position of the plant. Fill the hole with water and let the dirt settle, repeat until ground level. With proper drainage, the water will settle in a few minutes. Firm the soil with your hands, do not stamp in. Mound loose soil or mulch around the bud union. Then after the possibility of freezing temperatures pass slowly remove the mulch until the bud union is completely exposed to the warmth of the sun.

Sunsprite Planted as A Bare Root Rose
Sunsprite Planted as A Bare Root Rose

Planting Bare Root Roses Is Easy

Many folks simply do not know that the lovely potted 3-5 gallon roses you see at the nursery and garden centers are arriving now and earlier from my favorite grower like Week’s Nursery as bare root and they are planting them in 3-5 gallon pots to leaf out and grow strong and for you to buy in a matter of a few weeks later.

There is no reason for you to be afraid of planting your own bare root roses and if you want the kinds of roses you see and can only dream of in the Weeks Catalog then let’s become one with the bare root planting process. It’s easy, fun and rewarding.