Biltmore Rose Garden Awarded Prestigious ‘Award of Excellence’

Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams

“Education is the key to the heart of rosarians of the World Federation of Rose Societies. People from all over the world have on their bucket list to travel to every WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ Rose Garden in the World. The Biltmore Rose Garden is a welcome, exciting addition to our world class rose gardens.” says Jolene Adams

Asheville, NC ~ The Biltmore Rose Garden, home of the world famous International Rose Trails, host to rose breeders and rosarians from Canada, the U.S., France, Ireland, Great Britain, and Germany was awarded the prestigious World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) ‘Award of Excellence’, Friday, September 24th in the Biltmore Estate Rose Garden. On hand to receive the award from Vice President of the World Federation of Rose Societies, Jolene Adams was Biltmore Horticulturalist, Parker Andes, and Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson as well as this year’s Biltmore International Rose Trial judges and sponsors of the event; Witherspoon Roses, Mr. & Mrs. David Pike, and Mills Mix Rose Fertilizer, Mr. & Mrs. John Beaty. The highly sought after and prestigious ‘Garden of Excellence’ Award was established to improve the public’s knowledge in all matters concerning the rose. ‘Award of Excellence’ Gardens world wide must meet the following requirements to qualify:

The WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ recognizes the highest levels of arrangement in the field of rose garden development, maintenance and display.

  1. Eligibility. A garden may be eligible for an award which has:
  2. Demonstrated sustained performance in providing high quality displays of roses which are:
  • Beautiful and attractive and open to the public (and/or)
  • Educational, whereby the knowledge of the public and its interest in roses is enhanced (and/or)
  • Of assistance with the preservation of the genus (or)
  1. Sustained performance in conducting international rose trials.
  2. Private gardens will be considered, but the public must have unlimited access throughout the full flowering period.

    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden
    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden

Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson graciously accepted the award from Ms. Adams during the Friday evening at the reception of the Biltmore International Rose Trials that will be conducted Saturday, September 25th. All judges for the 2016 Biltmore Rose Trials were on hand for the unveiling of the ‘Award of Excellence’ to view its permanent home in the Biltmore Rose Garden. For More information to tour the estate and Biltmore Rose Garden garden visit. www.biltmore.com and more information about WFRS gardens visit www.worldrose.org

'Strike It Rich' A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance
‘Strike It Rich’ A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance

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Editors, please note: Photos are available on request to the media contacts on this release.

Media Contact: Susan Fox at gagasgarden.com@gmail.com

About The World Federation of Roses

The World Federation of Rose Societies is a federation of the national rose societies of 39 countries founded in 1968 representing rose lovers around the world. Their goal is to expand contact among them and increase the flow of knowledge about the rose.

The World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) was founded in 1968 in London, England by representatives from the rose societies of Australia, Belgium, Israel, New Zealand, Romania, South Africa, Great Britain and the USA. Its stated purpose was to hold international rose conferences and act as a clearing house for rose research.

To encourage and facilitate the interchange of information about and knowledge of the rose between national rose societies; To coordinate the holding of international conventions and exhibitions; To encourage, and where appropriate, sponsor research into problems concerning the rose; To establish common standards for judging rose seedlings; To assist in coordinating the registration of rose names; To establish a uniform system of rose classification; To encourage and advance international cooperation on all matters concerning the rose.

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The Fall of Roses, Sunrises & Sunsets

'Crimson Bouquet' at Sunrise in November
'Crimson Bouquet'
‘Crimson Bouquet’ a Meilland Grandiflora Rose at sunrise in the garden

Light dances with nature creating a symphony each second, every snapshot a mystery. A myriad of colors, reflections and pools of light bounce along twinkling as if the very eye of creation winks and says “Catch me if you can, for I’ll be gone forevermore into the space of eternity like the sands in the hourglass of time.”

Glistening at Sunrise with the Burning Bush | The Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima),
Glistening at Sunrise with the Burning Bush | The Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima),

This Thanksgiving I want to share how thankful I am for Illinois fall colors. This autumn is the most beautiful I can ever remember in Illinois. Most folks probably would not think of Illinois when they think of fall colors, however Central Illinois with its rolling hills, bountiful corn fields and soybeans that my Mother and Dad often said “feeds the world” is awesomely beautiful.

'Crimson Bouquet' at Sunrise in November
‘Crimson Bouquet’ at Sunrise in November

The roses intensified in colors and played off the sunlight and fall color of the leaves all season long. Here are the factors at play:

  • Changes in temperature;
  • Hours of daylight;
  • Wonders of nature (who knows how many variables!)
'Europeana' After the First Frost
‘Europeana’ Kissed By Jack Frost

The following factors all play a role in having a powerful affect in making each autumn and rose unique. So let’s look at how the three basic pigment groups: carotenoids and two types of flavonoids – anthocyanin and flavonols affect flower color:

'Europeana' with Ice Crystals
‘Europeana’ with Ice Crystals

Carotenoids Hold Color

During the hottest summer days the bright yellow and orange flowers tend to hold their color because the carotenoids are the most stable of the flower and fruit pigments.

Doris Day on a Fall Day
Doris Day on a Fall Day

They are enclosed in their own little compartments, called “plastids,” nestled inside the cytoplasm of individual plant cells, out of reach of many of the substances that a plant absorbs. Pesticides don’t reach them, nor do most of the nutrients and toxins plants absorb from the soil or air. When damaging substances do manage to get to them, these carotenoids have a second line of defense in their anti-oxidant actions that protect the plant even further. So the carotenoid pigments last and last. Whatever color the flower opens with, it maintains that color until well after it folds back up.

Legend | A Roses As Big As A Barn ;)
Legend | A Roses As Big As A Barn 😉

Hot Weather Increases Carotenoids I remember the most basic things my mother taught me about growing tomatoes: you have to have heat and sun to have a bountiful crop, and the fact that tomatoes are high in carotenoids is why.

With all pigments, the more pigment the flower produces in the bud, the brighter its colors will be. With carotenoids, a little bit of pigment makes a soft yellow flower. As the pigment levels increase, flowers become increasingly vivid yellows, oranges, and reds. This is the progression that a tomato follows as it ripens, gradually increasing production of carotenoids until it is fully ripe and red.

Princess Alexandra of Kent by David Austin
Princess Alexandra of Kent by David Austin Roses

Anthocyanins
The Blues Purples Pinks Reds  Anthocyanins are Unstable

Fall leaves change color in response to weather and this is an indicator of anthocyanin pigments. Anthocyanins are best known as the red pigment in fall leaves.

Did you notice how as the weather cools the red roses turn redder?

Colors fade almost completely as Anthocyanins & Flavanols burn away.

Anthocyanins are are much less stable than carotenoids.

Red Roses Turn Redder as The weather Cools Because

Anthocyanins Increase and Turn Red in Response to Cold

Burning Bush | The Old Oak Tree | Mexican Feather Grass
Burning Bush | The Old Oak Tree | Mexican Feather Grass

Nature does do some things that alter ph and other anthocyanin characteristics of plants. Functioning almost as a sort of anti-freeze in plant sap anthocyanins respond to dropping temperatures and produce more anthocyanins and become redder. For some reason, redder anthocyanins seem to have a more protective anti-freeze effect in plants. This happens in maple leaves.

maximize anothocyanins, to turn leaves their brightest reds and oranges, and to increase and darken the reds and pinks Maximum Anothocyanin Formula for Fall Color

The perfect weather is a factor for beautiful fall colors.

Bright sunny days

Less rain

Cold

Anthocyanins Degrade and Disappear with Heat 

Flowers that fade quickly in summer heat are high in bands of anthocyanin pigments. These flowers tend to intensify and are more beautiful in cooler weather since some anthocyanins are very sensitive to heat.

Sunset in Illinois
Sunset in Illinois

Source American Scientific *Carotene pigments (which are carotenoids) produce yellow, orange and red colors whereas anthocyanin pigments (which are flavonoids) produce red, purple, magenta and blue colors. Most red flowers use anthocyanin pigments to produce their red coloring (although some use carotenoids). On the paper strips, the anthocyanin pigments may have appeared as a purplish-reddish band. If different red flowers made similarly colored bands around the same height on the paper towel strip as one another, then they likely have the same pigment. If the bands are different colors and/or at different heights, however, then they’re probably different pigments. Carotene pigments are more commonly found in vegetables, and, in fact, they are what make carrots look orange. Yellow and orange flowers can have carotenoids or flavonoids, and blue flowers often have anthocyanin pigments that are modified. Some flowers even have chlorophyll that gives them green coloring.

 

Roses for Veterans’ Honor

Veterans' Honor at Sunrise in the Rose Garden
Veterans' Honor at Sunrise in the Rose Garden

Veterans’ Honor at sunrise in an Illinois Rose Garden

Veteran's Honor in the Rose Garden in September in Illinois
Veteran’s Honor in the Rose Garden in September in Illinois

‘Veterans’ Honor’ speaks volumes on this #WordlessWednesday Veterans’ Day. Thank-you to all of our Veterans for their service to our country.

‘Veteran’s Honor’ Hybrid Tea, was bred by Dr. Keith W. Zary (United States, 1997).
Introduced in United States by Jackson & Perkins Co. in 2000 as ‘Lady in Red’.

Army Air Force WWII

Army Air Force WWII

History of Veterans Day*

“World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France.

Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities.  This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two minutes before the armistice ending World War I went into effectIn November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11:00 a.m.The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words:

Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, andWhereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; andWhereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.”Info from the:

*History of Veterans Day – Office of Public Affairs

Army Air Force | High Flyers in England WWII
R.J. Proctor, my father 2nd from the left front row Army Air Force | High Flyers in England WWII

Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns
Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns