Rose Garden Recipe

The Chicago Flower & Garden Show Rose Garden in Bloom In March | Apricot Candy | Cinco de Mayo
The Rose Garden
The Rose Garden In Bloom

Rose Garden Recipe

Ingredients:

Roses of your Choice I chose Weeks Roses for this Recipe or you can choose from Star Roses, David Austin Roses of which I have some of each kind in this garden.

'Neil Diamond' 2nd place winner hybrid tea Digital Photography Photo Contest Novice Class
‘Neil Diamond’ 2nd place winner hybrid tea Digital Photography Photo Contest Novice Class

Remaining ingredients:

Canadian Sphagnum Peat

Mills Magic Rose Mix Fertilizer*

Soak in Haven Brand Soil Conditioners

6-8 hours full sun

Water

Tools I used Corona Gardening Tools for this Recipe

Lots of TLC

'Easy Does It' by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops, a vision of perfection
‘Easy Does It’ by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops

Optional Ingredients:

Wind chimes

Fountain

Decor

Companion plants (Proven Winners)

Champagne

Iced Tea

'Julia Child' by Weeks Roses featured this shot of 'Julia Child' in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar
‘Julia Child’ by Weeks Roses featured this shot of ‘Julia Child’ in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar

Preparation: Select a location with 6-8 hours full sun where you want to spend time that has a water source. Add elements for the pleasure and perception of your 5 senses, Sight; the roses and companion plants that attract pollinators. Hearing; wind chimes or a water fall type fountain for the relaxing sound of water Smell; fragrant roses and flowers, and add the beverage of your choice champagne, wine, iced tea, coffee. And we can add thermoception (temperature differences) by carefully choosing the location of a bench or swing in the shade or sun. Sound; wind chimes or a water fountain, Wind chimes, sound; the roses, sight; touch, textured companion plants like Mondo grass; smell, roses. Add your favorite beverage for taste, like champagne and hear the tinkling of the bubbles. Meditate, pray and stimulate the 6th sense plant these three roses according to instructions, add a fountain, decor, like wind chimes, a beautiful bench and companion plants and you’ve got your self a rose garden. Children and grown ups alike love my geese girls that I dress for holidays. The most important ingredient of all is Love. A garden is a gathering place for loved ones.

Corona Tools Needle Nose Pruners
Corona Tools Needle Nose Pruners

*Mills Magic Rose Mix is the perfect blend of organic soil amendments that I personally used to buy separately in 40-50 pound bags at the feed store, transport home and mix in a huge wheelbarrow and separate in 5-gallon pails. Now I just use this product exclusively. So if there is a secret to rose success this is it.

'Easy Does It' | 'Hot Cocoa' | 'Elle' | Pumpkin Patch'
‘Easy Does It’ | ‘Hot Cocoa’ | ‘Elle’ | Pumpkin Patch’ Floribunda Roses in a Garden Setting
Kids Love Tools
Kids Love Tools

Rose Pruning Review

Gaga's Garden Floribunda Rose Garden in Illinois

“It’s like déjà vu all over again.” ~ Yogi Berra

Gaga's Garden Floribunda Rose Garden in Illinois
Gaga’s Garden Floribunda Rose Garden in Illinois Featuring Gene Boerner | From Pruned To Bloom

Have you ever experienced déjà vu and wondered: was that true déjà vu or have I actually done the exact same thing at the same time last year? My rose pruning, is a ritualistic Rite of Spring. The ‘Rite of Spring’ is an actual ballet and orchestral concert work by Russian composer, Igor Stravinsky, that when first performed, at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées on 29 May 1913, the avant-garde nature of the music and choreography caused a sensation and a near-riot in the audience. I understand, if the symphony is anything like the cacophony of nature during spring and the urge to prune our bushes. Rosarians, and most all gardeners live for spring. It’s that simple. We lift leaves to peek for new growth and basal breaks.

Rosarians live for seeing new basal breaks
Rosarians live for seeing new basal breaks

What Is A Basal Break?

A basal break is a new cane that sprouts from the bud union on grafted roses and from the ground on roses grown on their own root. The most exciting discovery for rose lovers are new basal breaks on their rose bushes. Fresh, renewed growth – the sign of a healthy plant– and a promise of new flowers to come makes our work exciting and worthwhile.Use the proper tools  Corona_Principles_of_Pruning

How Can We Protect Basal Breaks?

'Corona Tools' Principals of Pruning Guide
‘Corona Tools’ Principals of Pruning Guide | Get Your PDF

Today let’s talk about pruning roses and some of the most finite processes that require delicate tools that let you feel like an artist or a surgeon.

Gardeners love to work with their hands. That’s why we love tools. Tools that allow us to do more finite work make us feel in touch with the force of nature.

Its All In The Tools

Corona Needle Nose Pruners
Corona Needle Nose Pruners

You can see by the demonstration in the pictures how the needlenose pruners, loppers and the small fork allow us to get close to delicate growth while protecting it. These are the tools that let you get close and protect delicate new growth. A picture of how these tools work is worth a thousand words.

Corona Convertible Loppers
Corona Convertible Loppers

Have they tools ready. God will find thee work. ~ Charles Kingsley

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President’s Day Rose Pruning Primer

Mr. Lincoln in Full Bloom
Rose Pruning Cart Ready For Rose Pruning Season
Rose Pruning Cart Ready For Rose Pruning Season

I would like to coin a new gardening phrase. Pruning post-traumatic stress disorder (PPTSD) I have it, it’s real, I suffer every President’s Day. It occurred from having pruned right after President’s Day in Texas, the supposed last day of the danger of a deadly killing frost. I relive the horror and the loss of 19 new rose bushes and having to re-prune 200 roses every President’s Day. The temperatures dipped to 8 degrees on March 10th well after the safe time to plant and prune. I lost all my new bushes and all the newly pruned bushes stimulated by my early pruning had to be pruned all over again. Well enough with my cheerful stories. This erroneous information was passed on to an unwitting northerner who grew up in the frozen tundra region on the frigid shores of Lake Michigan in Northern Illinois. Since today is President’s Day I thought I would cheer you all up and tell you again don’t prune too early.

Here is a primer on pruning your roses. It’s the best tips I’ve come up with over the years, as we get ready for the season of pruning.

Depending on the season and upon where you live pruning time can come between the middle of January and the end of April. The idea is to do it soon enough that you will not be cutting off too much new growth, and late enough that you will not promote premature growth. Usually this is just when the buds begin to swell, and then if you do not get a late frost the bushes will be off to a good start.

Pruned late, even after new growth starts, the canes are cut to a swollen dormant bud and the bush will do just fine, so it is probably better to prune late than too early. As I preach due to my disorder PPTSD, late-pruned bushes will bleed, but this has not been shown to be harmful to roses. Bleeding interferes with sealing cut ends but I stopped sealing smaller canes, with no increase in cane borer problems.

In addition to removing dead or diseased canes, there are several reasons for pruning. You want to remove non-productive branches and make room for ones that will make flowers. Remove crossing branches that clutter the bush or damage others. Open up the interior of the bush for ease in spraying and to promote good flowering stems. Remove non-productive canes at the base to promote growth of new vigorous canes. Finally, shape the bush to please you.

Before cutting out canes, you need to look at the branches they produced. If they have long, healthy, new branches, they should be left. If they have nothing but short twiggy non-blooming shoots, remove them. Sometimes there is not much left, but then perhaps the bush should be, as my mother used to say, “shovel pruned” and removed from the garden. We are told to reduce the number of canes to 3-5, but this is not necessarily a good guide.

Corona Garden Snips
Corona Garden Snips

Here are my tips:

  1. Wear tough protective clothing such as denim with long sleeves. It won’t snag as easily as some other fabrics.
  2. Wear thorn resistant gloves such as plastic coated garden gloves, or ones made of flexible leather.
  3. Watch where you put your hands and forearms. Thorns can penetrate almost any fabric I’ve used in the garden. I’ve had thorns penetrate the soles of my shoes, be careful.
  4. Invest in a small pruning or keyhole saw, they are essential for cutting larger canes and getting into tight spaces.
  5. A fairly large cane can be cut with hand shears if the cane is bent gently away from the shears, but I prefer to use a good pair of loppers rather than wrestle with the cane.
  6. Hold the shears so that the blunt blade is on the part to be cut off.
  7. Cut to an outside bud on upright-growing bushes or to an inside bud on spreading type bush. Cut to a bud pointing in the direction you want the branch to grow, the top bud usually will produce the dominant shoot.
  8. Cut to about ¼” of the bud, on a slight slant away from the bud. Cut shorter, the new shoot can break off in the wind, any longer causes unsightly dieback.
  9. If you feel you should seal cuts, use Elmer’s glue, I usually just seal large canes.
  10. Leave as many canes as are hardy and allow space to grow without crowding and are very well shaped.
  11. Learn to grasp the cane gently and very carefully with a slight circular motion.
  12. If you cut or accidentally knock off a branch you meant to leave don’t let it spoil your day. It will brow back.
  13. Do not prune once-blooming roses until they have bloomed.
  14. Prune miniature roses like hybrid teas and floribundas, if you have the time and patience.
  15. Old Garden Roses (OGR) are too diverse in nature to lay down rules. If you know the variety its best to research online for the best pruning for your OGR. In general, the best rule for pruning OGRs for the first two or three years is, “Don’t.”

    'Double Delight' hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Spagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection
    ‘Double Delight’ hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Spagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection

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Rose Classifications | Review Before You Buy

Gaga's Garden In Bloom
The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It
The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.”
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Roses are the ‘Diva’ of the flower world. Statistics say you want roses is your garden. One of the most often searched plant is the rose. Before you head out to garden centers to buy roses here’s an easy guide to what rose classifications mean. Here’s a few rose winners to look for. Rose bushes are a big investment. Decide what you want to achieve with roses before you buy.

'Good As Gold' Hybrid Tea Rose. Bold, beautiful, double-dipped yellow burnished with a touch of golden red, its a heart stopper!
‘Good As Gold’ Hybrid Tea Rose. Bold, beautiful, double-dipped yellow burnished with a touch of golden red, its a heart stopper!

An Easy To Love |  Easy To Grow | Rose Garden

85% of folks say roses are their favorite flower. They want easy-to-grow roses. Rose breeders are listening to YOU! Each year there are better, minimal care roses available that you can have great success with. Here are some Weeks Roses, Meilland Roses, Kordes Roses, and Conard Pyle Star Roses that I’ve personally grown and can vouch for. Some roses I list below have won at the Biltmore Rose Trials. You can also see videos on my Gaga’s Garden Facebook page. They are included because of their disease resistance, ease of care, beauty and fragrance. I can vouch for their high degree of success in my Illinois and Texas gardens. A side note on one of my new favorite roses: World famous hybridizer, Christian Bédard told a highly reliable friend of mine that the hybrid tea ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ may be the best rose he’s ever bred. I can tell you its at the top of my list for true perfection.

Modern Rose Classifications

Hybrid Tea | Grandiflora Rose | America’s Favorite Flower

Hybrid tea roses are perfect for any rose garden.*

  • Hybrid tea roses are ideal for cut flowers and creating your own bouquets
  • A hybrid tea is easily identifiable by its large, shapely 30-50 petal blooms on long stems
  • Grandiflora roses bear clusters of full size roses, the 1st was ‘Queen Elizabeth’ in 1954

Here are some true winners:

A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses | One of My Favorites

Weeks Roses 2nd in their The Downton Abbey Series | ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ New 2016 Description:

  • Dark even rose pink almost fuchsia
  • 4-5 “ Large old fashioned ruffled petals
  • The smell of peonies with a hint of spices

    'Francis Meilland' the Best Hybrid Tea named at the Biltmore International Rose Trials 2015
    ‘Francis Meilland’ hybrid tea rose, winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials ‘Pauline Merrell Award for Best Hybrid Tea Rose 2015’

‘Francis Meilland’ 1996 Description:

  • Color: Very large shell pink flowers
  • Winter hardy disease resistant
  • Winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials ‘Best Hybrid Tea’
  • Videoed and rated by me for the American Rose Society Web site
  • Strong fruity and citrusy fragrance

    Award of Excellence Best Established Rose | Bred by Dr. Walter E. Lammerts (United States, 1954).
    Award of Excellence Best Established Rose

‘Queen Elizabeth’ First Grandiflora 1954 Description:

  • Pink 4” with large petals, and pointed buds
  • Moderate rose fragrance
  • ‘Best Established’ Rose at The 2015 Biltmore International Rose Trials, I was a rose judge 

Floribundas | Polyantha

  • Floribundas are known for large clusters of flowered trusses & rapid bloom cycles
  • They bear flowers in large clusters and trusses in a profusion of bloom 
  • This class is unrivaled for providing massive colorful lasting garden displays 
  • Floribundas are hardier, more easy care & reliable in wet weather than their HT counterparts
  • Polyanthas are smaller but very sturdy plants with large clusters of small masses of blooms
'Bolero' In The Heat of Summer In Illinois
‘Bolero’ In The Heat of Summer In Illinois

‘Bolero’ Description:

  • White, large blooms with 100 petals
  • Old rose and spicy fragrance
  • Bushy and about 3 feet tall

    'Julia Child' by Weeks Roses featured this shot of 'Julia Child' in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar
    ‘Julia Child’ by Weeks Roses featured this shot of ‘Julia Child’ in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar

‘Julia Child’ Description:

  • One of the top selling roses in the world
  • Butter/gold yellow in color, medium very full 3-4” blooms
  • Strong licorice fragrance

    'Easy Does It' In The Illinois Garden
    ‘Easy Does It’ In The Illinois Garden

‘Easy Does It’ Description:

  • Gorgeous Mango Peach
  • Ever blooming with a moderate fragrance
  • Disease resistant, one of my all time favorites! 

For Hedge and Borders | Shrub Rose| English Roses

  • Shrub roses grow  in a sprawling direction from 5 to 15 feet in every direction based on your climate and growing condition
  • The unique group of English roses hybridized by David Austin Roses belong to this class of shrub roses.
  • Recurrent bloomers, often have wonderful fragrance of Old Garden Roses
Close-Up of 'Watercolors Home Run' Shrub Rose
Close-Up of ‘Watercolors Home Run’ Shrub Rose

‘Water Colors Home Run’ by Weeks Roses Description:

  • 3 colors showy flame red | yellow gold pink blush | Hot Pink
  • Medium height and bloom size
  • Winter hardy and disease resistant'Bonica' Beautiful prolific ever blooming shrub

‘Bonica’ Beautiful prolific ever blooming shrub Description:

  • ‘Bonica’ Inducted into the World Federation of Rose Societies Rose Hall of Fame in 2003
  • Prolific, blooms in flushes throughout the season.
  • Prolific, flush, medium to large, cluster-flowered (26-40 petals) stems of blooms cluster-flowered shrub
'Drift® Chamboeuf'
‘Drift® Chamboeuf’

‘Drift®’ Groundcover Roses by Star Roses and Plants

  • 8 colors from White Drift Rose to Red Drift Rose
  • Blooms 1 ½” -3” bushes about 2 feet tall spreading
  • Winter hardy, disease resistant, and easy to grow’
Named for the founding figure of the Industrial Revolution
‘Abraham Darby’ a David Austin Rose amed for the founding figure of the Industrial Revolution

‘Abraham Darby’ Description: David Austin Shrub

  • David Austin Shrub rose
  • Very large, rounded, cup-shaped flower with up to 70 petals
  • Vigorous and hardy in all areas
  • Fruity fragrance

Large Flowered Climbers | Climbing Roses

  • Dominated by their growth habit with long arching canes
  • Ability to climb over fences, walls, trellises arbors and pergolas
  • Climbers offer a wide range of flower colors, forms, & shapes with canes from 10-14 feet tall.
'Above and Beyond' after its roped up!
‘Above and Beyond’ after its roped up!

‘Above and Beyond’ Description:

  • The old classic ‘Westerland’ raised modernized with 21st century ‘best-off-best’ qualities!
  • Salmon-orange blend, repeat blooming, 10-14 feet
  • Old fashioned, 3 ½”-4” blooms, fruity fragrance
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
  • ‘4th of July’ Description:

      • Gorgeous Red striped and bright white
      • 10-14 feet canes
      • Fresh cut apple and & sweet rose fragrance

Miniature or miniflora roses

  • Ideal for containers and small space gardens, hardy due to being grown on own root
  • Great for edging, rockeries, indoor gardens
  • Minifloras are a new class introduced by ARS in 1999 for the size between miniature roses & floribundas
'All a Twitter'
‘All a Twitter’

‘All a’ Twitter’ Description:

  • Twinkling brilliant orange
  • Tall, medium size blooms
  • Winter hardy

*Roses require 6-8 hours of full sun. They will bloom with 4 hours of full sun but they have more foliage and less blooms.

 

 

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Biltmore Rose Garden Awarded Prestigious ‘Award of Excellence’

Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams

“Education is the key to the heart of rosarians of the World Federation of Rose Societies. People from all over the world have on their bucket list to travel to every WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ Rose Garden in the World. The Biltmore Rose Garden is a welcome, exciting addition to our world class rose gardens.” says Jolene Adams

Asheville, NC ~ The Biltmore Rose Garden, home of the world famous International Rose Trails, host to rose breeders and rosarians from Canada, the U.S., France, Ireland, Great Britain, and Germany was awarded the prestigious World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) ‘Award of Excellence’, Friday, September 24th in the Biltmore Estate Rose Garden. On hand to receive the award from Vice President of the World Federation of Rose Societies, Jolene Adams was Biltmore Horticulturalist, Parker Andes, and Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson as well as this year’s Biltmore International Rose Trial judges and sponsors of the event; Witherspoon Roses, Mr. & Mrs. David Pike, and Mills Mix Rose Fertilizer, Mr. & Mrs. John Beaty. The highly sought after and prestigious ‘Garden of Excellence’ Award was established to improve the public’s knowledge in all matters concerning the rose. ‘Award of Excellence’ Gardens world wide must meet the following requirements to qualify:

The WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ recognizes the highest levels of arrangement in the field of rose garden development, maintenance and display.

  1. Eligibility. A garden may be eligible for an award which has:
  2. Demonstrated sustained performance in providing high quality displays of roses which are:
  • Beautiful and attractive and open to the public (and/or)
  • Educational, whereby the knowledge of the public and its interest in roses is enhanced (and/or)
  • Of assistance with the preservation of the genus (or)
  1. Sustained performance in conducting international rose trials.
  2. Private gardens will be considered, but the public must have unlimited access throughout the full flowering period.

    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden
    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden

Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson graciously accepted the award from Ms. Adams during the Friday evening at the reception of the Biltmore International Rose Trials that will be conducted Saturday, September 25th. All judges for the 2016 Biltmore Rose Trials were on hand for the unveiling of the ‘Award of Excellence’ to view its permanent home in the Biltmore Rose Garden. For More information to tour the estate and Biltmore Rose Garden garden visit. www.biltmore.com and more information about WFRS gardens visit www.worldrose.org

'Strike It Rich' A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance
‘Strike It Rich’ A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance

###

Editors, please note: Photos are available on request to the media contacts on this release.

Media Contact: Susan Fox at gagasgarden.com@gmail.com

About The World Federation of Roses

The World Federation of Rose Societies is a federation of the national rose societies of 39 countries founded in 1968 representing rose lovers around the world. Their goal is to expand contact among them and increase the flow of knowledge about the rose.

The World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) was founded in 1968 in London, England by representatives from the rose societies of Australia, Belgium, Israel, New Zealand, Romania, South Africa, Great Britain and the USA. Its stated purpose was to hold international rose conferences and act as a clearing house for rose research.

To encourage and facilitate the interchange of information about and knowledge of the rose between national rose societies; To coordinate the holding of international conventions and exhibitions; To encourage, and where appropriate, sponsor research into problems concerning the rose; To establish common standards for judging rose seedlings; To assist in coordinating the registration of rose names; To establish a uniform system of rose classification; To encourage and advance international cooperation on all matters concerning the rose.

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Roses Things-To-Do Fall Checklist

'Oso Easy' Paprika in the Fall | Falling Leaves
'Pumpkin Patch Russet Floribunda Rose in the Fall
‘Pumpkin Patch’ Russet floribunda rose in the Fall

Temperatures in September are perfect to spend time in your rose garden throughout much of the country. You can enjoy the fruits of your labor and contemplate strategies for expansion and begin to winterize your roses. Make it a family activity by getting the children involved and teaching them about rose & garden care. Children love to help. My grandson with Down syndrome loves to haul bags of mulch. I don’t know what it is about digging but give a child a garden trowel and a place to dig and you have a happy kid.

Kids Love Tools
Kids Love Tools, hauling and digging

Also be on the look-out for plant bargains. At this time of year you can find the last of the season’s perennials; stragglers begging for a little TLC at the local garden centers. Plant them this fall and they’ll come roaring back as beautiful plants year after year. Garden tip: Save the name tags.

Fall in most parts of the country can produce a spectacular rose bloom. From Wisconsin to Texas I’ve seen roses blooming through the holidays. Remember roses can tolerate 3 days of hard frost of temperatures below 21 degrees before they are fully dormant for the season. So you can plan on roses for your bouquets for the Thanksgiving table even in Illinois, maybe Wisconsin. September is time to determine if there are still any American Rose Society rose shows in the area you may want to exhibit as well. The nights in the 2nd half of the month begin to get cooler which creates an environment for black spot and mildew, so continue your environmentally friendly spraying program to control black spot and mildew.

Here’s my September Rose Garden Check List. As I mentioned last year I swear by Will Radler’s method of winter rose protection. I publish Deb Kaiser’s method who I have the most respect for since she grows and cares for roses in Minnesota. I do believe roses in the far north require a bit more protection. Click for Deb Kaiser’s Winter Rose Protection Method Specialist of the Munsinger & Clemins Gardens, St. Cloud, MN.

“There are many factors why plants are winter hardy. ~ Will Radler

“When artificial means are used to bring a plant through winter, often they can conflict with some beneficial factors. For die-back-hardy woody plants, the simplest winter protection technique is applying a few inches of mulch year round. This allows the plant in the autumn to grow into its fullest state of natural dormancy. It prevents the soil from getting as cold as would in open ground. And it allows the plant to break dormancy slower in the spring. Cutting back the canes only in the spring provides shade to the lower branches and helps attract snow cover that insulates and guards against low temperature injury and fluctuating temperatures.” ~ Will Radler

Fall Rose Garden Check List

  1. Dead-head for the last time, Allow rose hips* to form signaling its time for the plant to go into dormancy.

    'Earth Song' Making Rose Hips
    ‘Earth Song’, Dr. Griffith J. Buck Grandiflora ‘Earth Kind’ grandiflora rose producing rose hips, gently signaling to the rose bush that its time to go into dormancy. It’s next to ‘Abraham Darby’ by David Austin Roses.
  2. Remove debris, remember that black spot ‘over-winters’ and you will battle it next spring if not removed.

    Corona Rake to rake up debris around 'Pumpkin Patch'
    Corona Rake to rake up debris around ‘Pumpkin Patch’
  3. Fertilize for the last time for the 2016 season, I add 2 cups of Mills Magic Rose Food at the base of the plant

    Mills Magic Rose Food | Add 2 cups around the base of each rose | Cover with Canadian Spagnum peat moss
    Mills Magic Rose Food | Add 2 cups around the base of each rose
  4. Apply a layer of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss.

    'Europeana' with all debris removed, fertilized, one layer of Canadian spagnum peat moss added prior to 6-6 inches of hard wood mulch for winter protection
    ‘Europeana’ floribunda rose with all debris removed, fertilized, one layer of Canadian spagnum peat moss added prior to 6-6 inches of hard wood mulch for winter protection
  5. Order, buy, spread hard wood mulch* as your winter cover; I’m using the William Radler winterizing method.

    Will Radler, Creator of The Knock Out® Family of Roses | He changed the face of the landscaping with a single rose bush
    Will Radler, Creator of The Knock Out® Family of Roses | He changed the face of the landscaping with a single rose bush
  6. Prune the bush like a vase, I removed weak inside canes.

    'Double Delight' hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Spagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection
    ‘Double Delight’ hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Sphagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection
  7. Each Rose bush will be covered for winter with hardwood mulch about 4-6 inches.

    'Livin' Easy' Floribunda Rose Final Fertilization With Hard Wood Mulch Application In September For Winterization Covering
    ‘Livin’ Easy’ Floribunda Rose Final Fertilization With Hard Wood Mulch Application In September For Winter Covering
  8. Inventory your garden rate your rose bushes: keepers, maybe, replace.

    Gaga's Garden In Bloom
    Gaga’s Garden In Bloom Takes on Similar Patterns Each Year
  9. Order Name Plates If you show roses its essential that you correctly identify your rose or you can be dis-qualified for improper identification.

    'Elle' hybrid tea rose by Mouchette/Meilland Named for my granddaughters with an engraved name plate
    ‘Elle’ hybrid tea rose by Mouchette/Meilland Named for my granddaughters with an engraved name plate
  10. Deep watering method to 8 inches continue to water as long as the ground is not frozen.
    Drip Watering System shown on 'Europeana'
    Drip Watering System shown on ‘Europeana’

    11. Trim tall canes. In October you may want to trim tall canes that winter winds will blow and damage other bushes.

    'Olympiad' cane over 7 feet tall that will be trimmed back next month after frost
    ‘Olympiad’ cane over 7 feet tall that will be trimmed back next month after frost

    Listly

    Headline for Roses Fall Into Winter
     REPORT
    Susan Fox Susan Fox
    Owner
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    Roses Fall Into Winter

    Fall produces beautiful rose blooms. Preparing the rose garden for winter is easy as the temperatures through much of the country begin to cool. Several methods to winterize your roses are available depending on the area in which you live. This list give you the basic do-it-yourself steps to winterize your rose garden and links to the professionals that winterize gardens in the coldest climates like Minnesota if you prefer to completely tip or cover your roses.**

    1

    1. Dead-head your roses for the last time this growing season. Allow rose hips* to form signaling its time for the pl...

    Roses Fall Into Winter | 1. Dead-head your roses for the last time this growing season. Allow rose hips* to form signaling its time for the pl...

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    2

    Remove debris, remember that black spot ‘over-winters’ and you will battle it next spring if not removed.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Remove debris, remember that black spot ‘over-winters’ and you will battle it next spring if not removed.

    #rose, garden, Flowers, roses, green, foliage, weeks roses, names of roses, roses, gardening, rose gardens, DIY, growing roses, rose gardening, rose plants, types of rose bushes, DIY, climbing rose, landscaping, shapes, form, texture, natural light, backlit, landscaped, multi-colored, Vibrant, Colored, Growth, flower, Agriculture, orange, springtime, color image, landscaping, fall, winter protection, fall, September, earth kind, organic, climbing roses, red orange, pink, colorful, nature lovers, winter protection, mulch, peat moss, Canadian sphagnum peat moss #roses

    3

    Fertilize for the last time for the 2016 season, I add 2 cups of Mills Magic Rose Food at the base of the plant

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Fertilize for the last time for the 2016 season, I add 2 cups of Mills Magic Rose Food at the base of the plant

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, #Winterize #Fall

    4

    Apply a layer of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Apply a layer of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss.

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, #europeana, #peatmoss, #roses, #gardenTips,

    5

    Order, buy, spread hard wood mulch* as your winter cover; I’m using the William Radler winterizing method.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Order, buy, spread hard wood mulch* as your winter cover; I’m using the William Radler winterizing method.

    #willradler, #winterize, #winter, #roses, #KnockOuts

    6

    Prune the bush like a vase, I removed weak inside canes.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Prune the bush like a vase, I removed weak inside canes.

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, rose gardening, #rose #plants, #pruning,

    7

    Each Rose bush will be covered for winter with hardwood mulch about 4-6 inches.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Each Rose bush will be covered for winter with hardwood mulch about 4-6 inches.

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, rose gardening, #rose #plants, #Livin' Easy, #Fall, #Winter

    8

    Inventory your garden rate your rose bushes: keepers, maybe, replace.

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Inventory your garden rate your rose bushes: keepers, maybe, replace.

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, rose gardening, #rose #plants, #inventory, #keepers, #replace, #maybe

    9

    Order Name Plates If you show roses its essential that you correctly identify your rose or you can be dis-qualified f...

    Roses Fall Into Winter | Order Name Plates If you show roses its essential that you correctly identify your rose or you can be dis-qualified f...

    #rose #garden #Flowers #roses #green #foliage #weeks roses #names of roses #roses #gardening #rose gardens #DIY #growing roses, rose gardening, #rose #plants, #meilland, #france, #meillandRoses, #elle, #pink

Q: What are Rosehips?

A: Blooms not cut will form rosehips which are the fruit of the rose plant containing the seeds. They form when you don’t cut spent blooms and start the bush into a slow dormancy process. You can remove the petals if you don’t want the petals to fall into the garden. The formation of rosehips signals to the plant that its time to go into dormancy for winter. The plant then gently ‘hardens off’ for winter.

Q: Why do you use hard wood mulch?

A: Because hard wood mulch is fully organic and biodegradable breaking down completely to help convert nutrients in clay soil.

I would like to dedicate this year’s Winterizing Roses article to Marsha Collier who wrote “Ebay for Dummies’ because she was ask me about what to do in the fall with her roses. She is an avid rose gardener, and looks to me like she does most things very well. Thank-you Marsha!

 

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Labor Days of Love

Summerifiq Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”
― Marcus Tullius Cicero

Labor Day is a day lots of us organize and get ready for the school year, and settling into the busy time of planning, and budgets at work before the holiday season is upon us.

Summerific® Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia | Meteor Shower
Summerific® Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia | Meteor Shower

Do you meditate? Does the simple act of ‘being’ give you pleasure? Or are you happier doing? Let me give you an example. I explained to my daughter-in-law aka my therapist that I didn’t really enjoy watching the cooking channels.

'Sunsprite' Blooming on Labor Day Week-End
‘Sunsprite’ Blooming on Labor Day Week-End

I told her watching them made me feel inadequate as a cook and that they make me feel like running out out and start creating elegant meals. She said, “that’s because “You’re a doer.”

'Stormy Weather' Against a backdrop of Blue Skies and Fluffy Clouds
‘Stormy Weather’ Against a backdrop of Blue Skies and Fluffy Clouds

Another example of ‘doer’ behavior is this: time and time again I would invite my Mother to come sit in the rose garden with me. No sooner than the moment I would sit down than I would see a spent bloom and hop up and start dead-heading.

'Oh My!' Floribunda Roses Against A September Sky
‘Oh My!’ Floribunda Roses Against A September Sky

Gardening is the perfect outlet for ‘doers’. Channel your labors of love. Spending time doing things in the garden teaches us so many things. I thought on this Labor Day I would reflect upon the things you can learn from Laboring in the Rose Garden:

Kimberlina' Blooming on Labor Day Week-End
‘Kimberlina’ Floribunda Rose Blooming on Labor Day Week-End

Reflections of a Laborer in The Rose Garden 

  • Patience;  planting, waiting for new growth is exciting
  • Forgiveness; Roses are very forgiving with a little TLC
  • Responsibility; though forgiving plants still require care
  • Balance; the balance of nature is delicate but strong
  • Tranquility; the sounds of nature can calm a troubled spirit
  • Harmony; nature in balance is beautiful to watch
  • You learn more while being on your knees
  • Sharing; a garden is a gathering place
  • Fragrance; memory triggers evoke strong emotions
  • Labors Of Love: You create your own aesthetically pleasing visual masterpiece

Aesthetics is a set of principles concerned with nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in capturing it through photography as art.

 

Rose Patterns

'Uncle Joe' known for having the most petals of any hybris tea growing in the pattern of a 'T'
Gaga's Garden In Bloom
Gaga’s Garden In Bloom Takes on Similar Patterns Each Year

Rose bloom cycles have unique patterns of growth that are distinguishable upon a visual registry of familiarity. A familiarity that is built on time and and meditative reflection together with your garden. What are some of the ways you can apply your own visualization system to describe the differences you see in your own microclimate? There are so many contributing factors occurring at different times yet the same variables continue to impact what you see. Only a visualization system can fully record the full effect. Your garden takes on distinguishable patterns of growth that are determined by these factors just to name a few.

  • Dates of pruning
  • Dead-heading promptness
  • Fertilization schedule
  • Water levels
  • Sun
  • Disease
  • Draughts
  • Pests
  • Soil Type
  • Care
  • The Most Often Replicated Pattern: Gagas Garden Floribunda Rose Garden
    The Most Often Replicated Visualization Pattern: Gaga’s Garden Floribunda Rose Garden

As a former merchandiser I’ve suggested to gardeners that you keep a diary of historic natural events that impact your garden. All of our buying of merchandise was based on history. The same can be said for plans in your garden. Much of what will happen and your plans to purchase and budgets are based on historical data.

'Uncle Joe' known for having the most petals of any hybris tea growing in the pattern of a 'T'
‘Uncle Joe’ known for having the most petals of any hybrid tea growing in the pattern of a ‘T’ grows in the same shape every year

One of the most unusual patterns I’ve noticed in a visualization system of record keeping is that each rose bush no matter how it’s pruned grows back in the same symmetry. Year in and year out established bushes will recreate a pattern of growth quite similar if not almost the same in symmetric patterning. The genetic code reproduces an almost perfect replica of itself after a winter dormancy year in and year out. A mystery to me and yet one I observe and is part of my visualization system.

'Julia Child' floribunda grow in the same shapely form every year
‘Julia Child’ floribunda grow in the same shapely form every year

For your visualization system start a journal and take note of the varieties that are most likely to have the most similar growth patterns. Record these things:

  • What do you like about the growth characteristics?
  • Does the plant generate the same number of canes each year?
  • When do basal breaks occur?
  • What contributing factors change the plant growth pattern?
    Bolero'
    ‘Bolero’

    'Easy Does It' Patterned Growth Each Year
    ‘Easy Does It’ Patterned Growth Each Year

 

 

 

Roses; If You Can’t Say Something Nice…

The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It
The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It

“If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.” Did your Mama or Daddy teach you this, or even Grandmother?

Growing Green Peppers & Hot Peppers For The Family
Growing Green Peppers & Hot Peppers For The Family

As grown-ups my kids said to me “Mom, we had no idea you didn’t like bell peppers.” Because green peppers are a ‘super food’, I cooked with them and made stuffed green peppers. My entire family love green peppers. It was and is important to me that my children make their own decisions without me influencing them with negative comments.

Good Roses Start With The Right Soil| Organics Mechanics
Good Roses Start With The Right Soil | Organics Mechanics

We can heavily influence our friends and family by portraying people, plants & products in a positive light. You know its true. A third-party endorsement and good PR about a product or person is far more valuable than an advertisement. Why? Because anyone that can write a check can buy advertising; but when real people say good things about people or products it has the power to influence our decisions about that person, plant or product. I know I read the Amazon Reviews written by real people before I decide to buy a product.

The 'Back of the Lil Red Barn' Rose Garden
The ‘Back of the Lil Red Barn’ Rose Garden

Here’s an example about roses. I grew the popular hybrid tea rose ‘John F. Kennedy’ in N. Illinois in the 80’s. It didn’t perform well for me. I grew to dislike the rose. So when my Texas rose garden apprentice, friend and neighbor, Karen Crelia chose ‘John F. Kennedy’ for her front yard show piece rose I didn’t say one word. Remember there are variables in play like the Texas soil, climate  and which grower grew her plant that may affect how well her JFK would do. In the Texas climate and soil ‘John F. Kennedy’ may do very well. Guess what? Her ‘John F. Kennedy’ was spectacular!

'John F. Kennedy' Planted Bare Root Rose | First Bloom in Central Illinois
‘John F. Kennedy’ Planted Bare Root Rose | First Bloom in Central Illinois

So Here We Grow Again

‘John F’ Kennedy’ is blooming in the sandy loam soil of central Illinois with Organic Mechanics, organic soil. I add 2 cups of Mills Magic Rose Food. in the organic soil mix and top with Canadian Spagnum Peat Moss. This is my first bloom of ‘John F. Kennedy’ it was just planted this spring as a bare root rose. It looks like it’s going to do very well.

'John F. Kennedy' Planted Bare Root | First Bloom in Central Illinois
‘John F. Kennedy’ Planted Bare Root | First Bloom in Central Illinois

By the way. Chris Van Cleave said his Grandmother told him “If you can’t say something nice then come sit by me.” I love that quote!

Choose Amazon Smile | Support The American Rose Society
Choose Amazon Smile When You Shop | Support The American Rose Society

Some Roses “Like It Hot”

A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses | One of My Favorites

Some Roses Like It Hot

This is an updated article I wrote for The American Rose The Magazine of The American Rose Society edition July/August 2014 to now include Illinois Roses 

This is 'Sugar Moon' in the foreground and 'Francis Meilland' in the background
This is ‘Sugar Moon’ HT Roses in the foreground and ‘Francis Meilland’ HT Roses in the background | ‘Julia Child’ a yellow floribunda rose

How hot is too hot for roses?

Moving from Texas to Illinois in June of 2011 I thought I was saying good-bye to mind numbing days of counting the days of temperatures over 100, water restrictions, and days without rain. Then the summer of 2011 the entire nation faced a 100-year drought and record heat. Even though I had had enough of Texas heat it seems I had packed up Texas weather and taken it with me to the rolling cornfields of Central Illinois. The summer of 2011 was also a 100-year draught across much of the nation proving once again a message that rosarians can convey to each other and those new to growing roses. Roses are resilient and can withstand very hot temperatures as long as they are watered regularly. Click to read: Killer Texas Summer Shatters Heat Drought Records.

Close-Up of 'Watercolors Home Run' Shrub Rose
Close-Up of ‘Watercolors Home Run’ Shrub Rose

Fast forward June 2016!

Here’s the Question I was asked to answer for readers of American Rose Magazine July/August edition 2014 

Question: Do you think its better to “use canopies or individual coverings for roses during extreme heat conditions or let your roses sulk in the summer heat”?

'Sugar Moon' Hybrid tea Rose in The Illinois Garden After Sustained Heat
‘Sugar Moon’ Hybrid tea Rose in The Illinois Garden After Sustained Heat

There’s more than one answer to the question:

When roses (and virtually any other plants) reach the point of excessive water stress, they don’t “feed,” nor do they try to grow. They simply try to remain alive. That’s why even when you’re watering daily with what feels like excessive water amounts, many rose bushes will begin shedding their leaves to reduce their water stress. With less leaves and they don’t “sweat”,  transpire it through the foliage. That slows and can literally stop the flow of sap from the roots upward, so no food is taken in. Nature demands balance. Even in times of extreme heat I have seen my roses continue to remain beautiful with just smaller blooms and less frequent bloom cycles. Roses seem to go into almost a dormancy state to conserve energy and water.

'Easy Does It' In The Illinois Garden Close-Up
‘Easy Does It’ In The Illinois Garden Close-Up

Answer: For the purpose of this article I chose to let my Roses swelter in both N. Texas and now Central Illinois heat with protection in mind to identify heat tolerant roses that perform better under extreme heat and low water conditions. 

Here’s ways that we can continue to grow good roses and preserve our plants and maintain water restrictions. In extreme heat like the DFW area I recommend protection and filtered light as protection from the unending heat rather than canopies if possible and here are a few tactics I employed in N. Texas while growing over 200 roses there. I had hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas, miniatures, shrubs, David Austin Roses, Large Flowered Climbers, and Knock-Outs.

'Bolero' In The Illinois Garden Setting
‘Bolero’ In The Illinois Garden Setting
  1. Select roses suitable for a hot climate. I have a list of modern roses that I have proved can survive extreme N. Texas heat for 20 + years. And you can also plant OGR’s that are adapted to heat, those in existence before 1867. The beauty of these roses lie in their heady fragrance and can include Hybrid Perpetuals, Teas, Chinas, Hybrid Musks, Bourbons and other Classes like these. Avoid using antique roses bred for colder climates such as the Kordes Roses and Rugosas.
  2. Just as dark colors retain heat and light colors keep us cooler, lighter-colored roses can hold up to extreme heat better than dark reds, and oranges do. Plant darker colored roses where there is some protection or perhaps less than full sun. Choose some white, light-pink and pale yellow roses that seem to hold up better to extreme temperatures.
  3. The elevated beds I put in in N. Texas allowed me to put in a laser cut drip irrigation watering system. I watered deeply and at the base of the plant, not directly on the leaves of the plant. I set timers to water very early in the morning not ever during full sun. During times when water restrictions were in place we could use the hose and I deep watered allowable amounts and my roses did just fine. Remember that dehydration during summer months can put your plants in peril. If you have an irrigation system in place be sure that it’s set to water at least 2 inches of water per week, and does not water directly on the leaves of the plant during full sun. This is difficult to determine when you take into consideration factors like wind, temperature and type of soil. So you may want to purchase a moisture gauge for your rose garden.
  4. Fertilize from two weeks to 30 days prior to when you expect hot weather to reach and maintain temperatures near 98F. Organic fertilizers and soil amendments are far less likely to burn your plants even during sustained high temperatures. For those of you living in zones where temperatures really start to warm up in late-February, this is a time to begin fertilizing. Then fertilize monthly until mid-May when temperatures start to rise. You really have to watch carefully your fertilizer to water ratio during the hottest months. That should be your signal to start reducing your fertilizing until late in the summer.
  5.  Shredded hardwood mulch retains moisture and keeps the soil cooler; I use layers of hardwood mulch over Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss that I add each season.
  6. Plant roses with protection from afternoon sun and be sure they still receive at least 6 hours of direct morning sunlight.
  7. Roses love to grow in largely organic soil with good drainage. To grow the best roses in summer heat, plant your rose in a deep hole that drains well. Water regularly and deeply, In Texas my roses in the front yard had indirect afternoon sun with the dappled light of oak trees I planted that grew to be mighty shade providing oak trees, and this provided a canopy of well-needed cooling shade cover.

    'Bolero' In The Heat of Summer In Illinois
    ‘Bolero’ In The Heat of Summer In Illinois

You can use a shade cloth cover if that is aesthetically acceptable to you. Don ‘t plant roses next to a South or West facing wall, especially stone or brick because the stone holds heat that can also burn your plants and will reflect too much heat. My roses that I planted and added stones along a path held heat late into the evening on a hot summer day due to absorbing qualities of the stone and I could see these roses suffered from the excessive heat of the stone, the roses with grass next to them were far cooler. Don’t forget that layers of mulch help to keep the soil cool. Spraying off the roses in the evening helps to cool your plants and wash away spider mites but never spray during direct sunlight.

My Susan Fox Top Ten List from my Texas  & Illinois Garden Garden

  1. Julia Child, F
  2. Francis Meilland, HT
  3. Sugar Moon, HT
  4. Pretty Lady Rose, HT
  5. Bolero, F
  6. Easy Does It, F
  7. Take It Easy, S
  8. Pumpkin Patch, F
  9. Watercolors Home Run, S
  10. Europeana, F

I also thought I would ask Minnesota Rose Gardener Jack Falkner about heat in the a northern climate and here’s what Jack had to say:

“Folks are often surprised to hear that we get a lot of hot weather in Minnesota in the summer.  It’s not at all unusual for us to see temperatures upwards to the high nineties and 100, along with very high humidity.  That’s when I wash my roses at mid-day to cool them down.  Syringing is also the best thing you can do to control spider mites.  You can use any kind of nozzle that delivers a sharp stream, but I use a spider mite blaster that shoots a high-pressure fan of water up from the bottom of the plants and they love it.  An added advantage is that I get pretty wet in the process, which makes me feel like a kid running through the sprinkler on a hot day.” ~ Jack Falkner

Magnificent 'Take It Easy' in Full Bloom
Magnificent ‘Take It Easy’ in Full Bloom
'Pumpkin Patch' Candelabras Light Dawn With An Orange Glow
‘Pumpkin Patch’ Candelabras Light Dawn With An Orange Glow