Biltmore Rose Trials 2016 Results

'Polar Express™ Sunbelt®' Rose Arborose® Collection | Single bloom shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 26, 2016
Spray of 'Polar Express™ Sunbelt®'
Biltmore Rose Trials Winning Rose Shrub ‘Polar Expressâ„¢ Spray of ‘Polar Expressâ„¢ Sunbelt®’ Rose Arborose® Collection shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 26, 2016 Sunbelt®’

The Biltmore’s Rose Garden has been home to the International Rose Trials since 2011. 100’s of varieties from growers and breeders worldwide have been planted and cared for by Biltmore’s expert horticulturalists and Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson.

Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams

Each trial lasts two years and a permanent jury judges the roses four times per year. During this year’s competition, Saturday, September 24th the international and permanent juries conducted the final round of judging for the trial group of roses planted in Biltmore’s Historic Rose Garden, just named an ‘Award of Excellence Garden’ Friday, September 23rd by the World Federation of Rose Societies.

“The Biltmore Rose Garden is the perfect setting for trials,” said Parker Andes Biltmore’s Horticulturist and trials manager. “We’ve enjoyed introducing these new varieties to our guests as they stroll through the gardens. It has been an educational experience, and it complements the work we do to care for Biltmore’s collection of old garden and modern roses.” Before entering their roses into trials and competition, breeders work on their creations for four or five years prior. Roses to be judged this year are from Canada, France, Ireland, Germany, the UK and the U.S. The trials are a valuable way for the home gardener to learn what roses do well and what may be potential candidates for their own gardens. Trials of this type are open to rose breeders around the world – from professional to beginner.

About The Biltmore Rose Trials

New rose varieties are planted for trial each May. They are evaluated for overall health and rigor; fragrance; disease resistance; and ability to repeat bloom. Guests visiting Biltmore’s gardens may view the roses currently on trial in borders in the Walled Garden and areas near the Rose Garden. Peak blooming time in Biltmore’s rose garden occurs typically in mid-May and September. Here are this year’s award winning roses and breeders.

Biltmore International Rose Trials 2016 Results

Type of Award: The Guilded Age Award for Best Climber

Winner: ‘Honeymoonâ„¢’ Arborose bred by Kordes Roses

Breeder: Newflora, LLC, For more about ‘Honeymoon’ click HERE

'Honeymoon™ Arborose®" Created by Kordes North America Distributed by Newflora, LLC
‘Honeymoonâ„¢ Arborose®” Created by Kordes North America Distributed by Newflora, LLC | Biltmore Rose Trials Winner of Most Disease Resistant Rose

Type of Award: Lord Burleigh Award for Most Disease Resistant

Winner: ‘Honeymoonâ„¢’ Arborose bred by Kordes Roses

Breeder/Distributor: Newflora, LLC, For more about ‘Honeymoonâ„¢ Arborose’ click HERE

Honeymoon™ Arborose®
Honeymoon™ Arborose® Climber | Lord Burleigh Award for Most Disease Resistant Honeymoon Arborose

Type of Award: Pauline Merrell Award for Best Hybrid Tea

Winner: P9511T

Breeder/Distributor: Ping Lim Distributor/TBD Click HERE

P9511T Bred by Roses by Ping Lim
P9511T Bred by Roses by Ping Lim

Types of Awards: Edith Wharton Award for Best Floribunda

George & Edith Vanderbilt Award for Most Outstanding Rose Of The Trials      

William Cecil Award For Best Growth Habit Polar Express Sunbelt

Winner of all three above awards: ‘Polar Express Sunbelt’

Breeder & Distributor: Kordes Roses International, Newflora, LLC

To learn more about ‘Polar Express Sunbelt’ click HERE

'Polar Express™ Sunbelt®' Rose Arborose® Collection | Single bloom shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 26, 2016
Spray of  ‘Polar Expressâ„¢ Sunbelt®’ Rose Arborose® Collection shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 26, 2016
Polar Express™ Sunbelt® Rose | Sweeps the Show winning Best Floribunda | Best Growth Habit | Best Overall Rose
Polar Express™ Sunbelt® Rose | Sweeps the Show winning Best Floribunda | Best Growth Habit | Best Overall Rose
'Polar Express™ Sunbelt®' Rose Arborose® Collection | Single bloom shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 26, 2016
‘Polar Expressâ„¢ Sunbelt®’ Rose Arborose® Collection | Single bloom shot taken of winning shrub Sunday, September 25, 2016
Congratulations to Kordes Roses & Newflora, LLC
Alexander Kordes | Kordes Team at the New York American Rose Society Convention

Type of Award: Chauncey Beadle Award for Best Shrub 

Winner: ‘The Lark Ascending’

Breeder: David Austin Roses

To read about David Austin ‘The Lark Ascending’ click HERE

David Austin Lark Ascending
David Austin Lark Ascending | Bred by David Austin Roses of the UK

Its wonderful to see the dedicated rosarians that come as rose judges to rate the roses and share the day with you. Here’s the Biltmore International Rose Trials Rotogravure 2016.

Teresa Byington Judging the Biltmore Rose TrailsTeresa Byington judging roses

The Van Cleaves, Chris & Tina his lovely bride of Rosechat Radio and Cindy Dale at the Reception
The Van Cleaves, Chris & Tina his lovely bride of Rosechat Radio and Cindy Dale at the Reception
Dr. & Mrs Keith Zary
World renown rose breeder Dr. & Mrs Keith Zary

The lovely Teresa Byington & Marci Martin | Two of the most beautiful, kind sharing world class rosarians you will ever meet.

Rose Judges Listen To Instructions from Jolene Adams
Lovely Past President of ARS, Marlyn Wellan, & Rose Judges Listen To Instructions from Jolene Adamschis_emily
Paul Zimmerman | LeeAnn Donnelly | Parker Andes The Biltmore Team that put the International Rose Trials Together
Paul Zimmerman | LeeAnn Donnelly | Parker Andes
The Biltmore Team that put the International Rose Trials Together

 

 

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Biltmore Rose Garden Awarded Prestigious ‘Award of Excellence’

Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams
Emily Tice Wilson | Past American Rose Society President, Jolene Adams

https://youtu.be/6pKNIjJRBcQ

“Education is the key to the heart of rosarians of the World Federation of Rose Societies. People from all over the world have on their bucket list to travel to every WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ Rose Garden in the World. The Biltmore Rose Garden is a welcome, exciting addition to our world class rose gardens.” says Jolene Adams

Asheville, NC ~ The Biltmore Rose Garden, home of the world famous International Rose Trails, host to rose breeders and rosarians from Canada, the U.S., France, Ireland, Great Britain, and Germany was awarded the prestigious World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) ‘Award of Excellence’, Friday, September 24th in the Biltmore Estate Rose Garden. On hand to receive the award from Vice President of the World Federation of Rose Societies, Jolene Adams was Biltmore Horticulturalist, Parker Andes, and Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson as well as this year’s Biltmore International Rose Trial judges and sponsors of the event; Witherspoon Roses, Mr. & Mrs. David Pike, and Mills Mix Rose Fertilizer, Mr. & Mrs. John Beaty. The highly sought after and prestigious ‘Garden of Excellence’ Award was established to improve the public’s knowledge in all matters concerning the rose. ‘Award of Excellence’ Gardens world wide must meet the following requirements to qualify:

The WFRS ‘Award of Excellence’ recognizes the highest levels of arrangement in the field of rose garden development, maintenance and display.

  1. Eligibility. A garden may be eligible for an award which has:
  2. Demonstrated sustained performance in providing high quality displays of roses which are:
  • Beautiful and attractive and open to the public (and/or)
  • Educational, whereby the knowledge of the public and its interest in roses is enhanced (and/or)
  • Of assistance with the preservation of the genus (or)
  1. Sustained performance in conducting international rose trials.
  2. Private gardens will be considered, but the public must have unlimited access throughout the full flowering period.

    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden
    World Federation of Rose Societies Award of Excellence Garden

Biltmore Rosarian, Emily Tice Wilson graciously accepted the award from Ms. Adams during the Friday evening at the reception of the Biltmore International Rose Trials that will be conducted Saturday, September 25th. All judges for the 2016 Biltmore Rose Trials were on hand for the unveiling of the ‘Award of Excellence’ to view its permanent home in the Biltmore Rose Garden. For More information to tour the estate and Biltmore Rose Garden garden visit. www.biltmore.com and more information about WFRS gardens visit www.worldrose.org

'Strike It Rich' A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance
‘Strike It Rich’ A Perfect Rose Color Match | The Biltmore House in the Distance

###

Editors, please note: Photos are available on request to the media contacts on this release.

Media Contact: Susan Fox at gagasgarden.com@gmail.com

About The World Federation of Roses

The World Federation of Rose Societies is a federation of the national rose societies of 39 countries founded in 1968 representing rose lovers around the world. Their goal is to expand contact among them and increase the flow of knowledge about the rose.

The World Federation of Rose Societies (WFRS) was founded in 1968 in London, England by representatives from the rose societies of Australia, Belgium, Israel, New Zealand, Romania, South Africa, Great Britain and the USA. Its stated purpose was to hold international rose conferences and act as a clearing house for rose research.

To encourage and facilitate the interchange of information about and knowledge of the rose between national rose societies; To coordinate the holding of international conventions and exhibitions; To encourage, and where appropriate, sponsor research into problems concerning the rose; To establish common standards for judging rose seedlings; To assist in coordinating the registration of rose names; To establish a uniform system of rose classification; To encourage and advance international cooperation on all matters concerning the rose.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Roses Things-To-Do Fall Checklist

'Oso Easy' Paprika in the Fall | Falling Leaves
'Pumpkin Patch Russet Floribunda Rose in the Fall
‘Pumpkin Patch’ Russet floribunda rose in the Fall

Temperatures in September are perfect to spend time in your rose garden throughout much of the country. You can enjoy the fruits of your labor and contemplate strategies for expansion and begin to winterize your roses. Make it a family activity by getting the children involved and teaching them about rose & garden care. Children love to help. My grandson with Down syndrome loves to haul bags of mulch. I don’t know what it is about digging but give a child a garden trowel and a place to dig and you have a happy kid.

Kids Love Tools
Kids Love Tools, hauling and digging

Also be on the look-out for plant bargains. At this time of year you can find the last of the season’s perennials; stragglers begging for a little TLC at the local garden centers. Plant them this fall and they’ll come roaring back as beautiful plants year after year. Garden tip: Save the name tags.

Fall in most parts of the country can produce a spectacular rose bloom. From Wisconsin to Texas I’ve seen roses blooming through the holidays. Remember roses can tolerate 3 days of hard frost of temperatures below 21 degrees before they are fully dormant for the season. So you can plan on roses for your bouquets for the Thanksgiving table even in Illinois, maybe Wisconsin. September is time to determine if there are still any American Rose Society rose shows in the area you may want to exhibit as well. The nights in the 2nd half of the month begin to get cooler which creates an environment for black spot and mildew, so continue your environmentally friendly spraying program to control black spot and mildew.

Here’s my September Rose Garden Check List. As I mentioned last year I swear by Will Radler’s method of winter rose protection. I publish Deb Kaiser’s method who I have the most respect for since she grows and cares for roses in Minnesota. I do believe roses in the far north require a bit more protection. Click for Deb Kaiser’s Winter Rose Protection Method Specialist of the Munsinger & Clemins Gardens, St. Cloud, MN.

“There are many factors why plants are winter hardy. ~ Will Radler

“When artificial means are used to bring a plant through winter, often they can conflict with some beneficial factors. For die-back-hardy woody plants, the simplest winter protection technique is applying a few inches of mulch year round. This allows the plant in the autumn to grow into its fullest state of natural dormancy. It prevents the soil from getting as cold as would in open ground. And it allows the plant to break dormancy slower in the spring. Cutting back the canes only in the spring provides shade to the lower branches and helps attract snow cover that insulates and guards against low temperature injury and fluctuating temperatures.” ~ Will Radler

Fall Rose Garden Check List

  1. Dead-head for the last time, Allow rose hips* to form signaling its time for the plant to go into dormancy.

    'Earth Song' Making Rose Hips
    ‘Earth Song’, Dr. Griffith J. Buck Grandiflora ‘Earth Kind’ grandiflora rose producing rose hips, gently signaling to the rose bush that its time to go into dormancy. It’s next to ‘Abraham Darby’ by David Austin Roses.
  2. Remove debris, remember that black spot ‘over-winters’ and you will battle it next spring if not removed.

    Corona Rake to rake up debris around 'Pumpkin Patch'
    Corona Rake to rake up debris around ‘Pumpkin Patch’
  3. Fertilize for the last time for the 2016 season, I add 2 cups of Mills Magic Rose Food at the base of the plant

    Mills Magic Rose Food | Add 2 cups around the base of each rose | Cover with Canadian Spagnum peat moss
    Mills Magic Rose Food | Add 2 cups around the base of each rose
  4. Apply a layer of Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss.

    'Europeana' with all debris removed, fertilized, one layer of Canadian spagnum peat moss added prior to 6-6 inches of hard wood mulch for winter protection
    ‘Europeana’ floribunda rose with all debris removed, fertilized, one layer of Canadian spagnum peat moss added prior to 6-6 inches of hard wood mulch for winter protection
  5. Order, buy, spread hard wood mulch* as your winter cover; I’m using the William Radler winterizing method.

    Will Radler, Creator of The Knock Out® Family of Roses | He changed the face of the landscaping with a single rose bush
    Will Radler, Creator of The Knock Out® Family of Roses | He changed the face of the landscaping with a single rose bush
  6. Prune the bush like a vase, I removed weak inside canes.

    'Double Delight' hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Spagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection
    ‘Double Delight’ hybrid tea rose, pruned like a vase, fertilized, Canadian Sphagnum peat moss layer added, ready for mulch for winter protection
  7. Each Rose bush will be covered for winter with hardwood mulch about 4-6 inches.

    'Livin' Easy' Floribunda Rose Final Fertilization With Hard Wood Mulch Application In September For Winterization Covering
    ‘Livin’ Easy’ Floribunda Rose Final Fertilization With Hard Wood Mulch Application In September For Winter Covering
  8. Inventory your garden rate your rose bushes: keepers, maybe, replace.

    Gaga's Garden In Bloom
    Gaga’s Garden In Bloom Takes on Similar Patterns Each Year
  9. Order Name Plates If you show roses its essential that you correctly identify your rose or you can be dis-qualified for improper identification.

    'Elle' hybrid tea rose by Mouchette/Meilland Named for my granddaughters with an engraved name plate
    ‘Elle’ hybrid tea rose by Mouchette/Meilland Named for my granddaughters with an engraved name plate
  10. Deep watering method to 8 inches continue to water as long as the ground is not frozen.
    Drip Watering System shown on 'Europeana'
    Drip Watering System shown on ‘Europeana’

    11. Trim tall canes. In October you may want to trim tall canes that winter winds will blow and damage other bushes.

    'Olympiad' cane over 7 feet tall that will be trimmed back next month after frost
    ‘Olympiad’ cane over 7 feet tall that will be trimmed back next month after frost

    Listly

    [listly id=”1Eax” layout=”full” per_page=”25″]

Q: What are Rosehips?

A: Blooms not cut will form rosehips which are the fruit of the rose plant containing the seeds. They form when you don’t cut spent blooms and start the bush into a slow dormancy process. You can remove the petals if you don’t want the petals to fall into the garden. The formation of rosehips signals to the plant that its time to go into dormancy for winter. The plant then gently ‘hardens off’ for winter.

Q: Why do you use hard wood mulch?

A: Because hard wood mulch is fully organic and biodegradable breaking down completely to help convert nutrients in clay soil.

I would like to dedicate this year’s Winterizing Roses article to Marsha Collier who wrote “Ebay for Dummies’ because she was ask me about what to do in the fall with her roses. She is an avid rose gardener, and looks to me like she does most things very well. Thank-you Marsha!

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Labor Days of Love

Summerifiq Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”
― Marcus Tullius Cicero

Labor Day is a day lots of us organize and get ready for the school year, and settling into the busy time of planning, and budgets at work before the holiday season is upon us.

Summerific® Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia | Meteor Shower
Summerific® Hibiscus | Summer Snapdragons | Supertunias Vista Fuchsia | Meteor Shower

Do you meditate? Does the simple act of ‘being’ give you pleasure? Or are you happier doing? Let me give you an example. I explained to my daughter-in-law aka my therapist that I didn’t really enjoy watching the cooking channels.

'Sunsprite' Blooming on Labor Day Week-End
‘Sunsprite’ Blooming on Labor Day Week-End

I told her watching them made me feel inadequate as a cook and that they make me feel like running out out and start creating elegant meals. She said, “that’s because “You’re a doer.”

'Stormy Weather' Against a backdrop of Blue Skies and Fluffy Clouds
‘Stormy Weather’ Against a backdrop of Blue Skies and Fluffy Clouds

Another example of ‘doer’ behavior is this: time and time again I would invite my Mother to come sit in the rose garden with me. No sooner than the moment I would sit down than I would see a spent bloom and hop up and start dead-heading.

'Oh My!' Floribunda Roses Against A September Sky
‘Oh My!’ Floribunda Roses Against A September Sky

Gardening is the perfect outlet for ‘doers’. Channel your labors of love. Spending time doing things in the garden teaches us so many things. I thought on this Labor Day I would reflect upon the things you can learn from Laboring in the Rose Garden:

Kimberlina' Blooming on Labor Day Week-End
‘Kimberlina’ Floribunda Rose Blooming on Labor Day Week-End

Reflections of a Laborer in The Rose Garden 

  • Patience;  planting, waiting for new growth is exciting
  • Forgiveness; Roses are very forgiving with a little TLC
  • Responsibility; though forgiving plants still require care
  • Balance; the balance of nature is delicate but strong
  • Tranquility; the sounds of nature can calm a troubled spirit
  • Harmony; nature in balance is beautiful to watch
  • You learn more while being on your knees
  • Sharing; a garden is a gathering place
  • Fragrance; memory triggers evoke strong emotions
  • Labors Of Love: You create your own aesthetically pleasing visual masterpiece

Aesthetics is a set of principles concerned with nature and appreciation of beauty, especially in capturing it through photography as art.

 

Rose Patterns

'Uncle Joe' known for having the most petals of any hybris tea growing in the pattern of a 'T'
Gaga's Garden In Bloom
Gaga’s Garden In Bloom Takes on Similar Patterns Each Year

Rose bloom cycles have unique patterns of growth that are distinguishable upon a visual registry of familiarity. A familiarity that is built on time and and meditative reflection together with your garden. What are some of the ways you can apply your own visualization system to describe the differences you see in your own microclimate? There are so many contributing factors occurring at different times yet the same variables continue to impact what you see. Only a visualization system can fully record the full effect. Your garden takes on distinguishable patterns of growth that are determined by these factors just to name a few.

  • Dates of pruning
  • Dead-heading promptness
  • Fertilization schedule
  • Water levels
  • Sun
  • Disease
  • Draughts
  • Pests
  • Soil Type
  • Care
  • The Most Often Replicated Pattern: Gagas Garden Floribunda Rose Garden
    The Most Often Replicated Visualization Pattern: Gaga’s Garden Floribunda Rose Garden

As a former merchandiser I’ve suggested to gardeners that you keep a diary of historic natural events that impact your garden. All of our buying of merchandise was based on history. The same can be said for plans in your garden. Much of what will happen and your plans to purchase and budgets are based on historical data.

'Uncle Joe' known for having the most petals of any hybris tea growing in the pattern of a 'T'
‘Uncle Joe’ known for having the most petals of any hybrid tea growing in the pattern of a ‘T’ grows in the same shape every year

One of the most unusual patterns I’ve noticed in a visualization system of record keeping is that each rose bush no matter how it’s pruned grows back in the same symmetry. Year in and year out established bushes will recreate a pattern of growth quite similar if not almost the same in symmetric patterning. The genetic code reproduces an almost perfect replica of itself after a winter dormancy year in and year out. A mystery to me and yet one I observe and is part of my visualization system.

'Julia Child' floribunda grow in the same shapely form every year
‘Julia Child’ floribunda grow in the same shapely form every year

For your visualization system start a journal and take note of the varieties that are most likely to have the most similar growth patterns. Record these things:

  • What do you like about the growth characteristics?
  • Does the plant generate the same number of canes each year?
  • When do basal breaks occur?
  • What contributing factors change the plant growth pattern?
    Bolero'
    ‘Bolero’

    'Easy Does It' Patterned Growth Each Year
    ‘Easy Does It’ Patterned Growth Each Year