Love My Calendar Girl Roses

'Gene Boerner' a floribunda rose named for the man that worked his entire life for Jackson & Perkins 'aka' as 'Papa Floribunda', he hybridized more than 60 roses.

Garden Legends Live On By Designs & Impressions They Leave on The Earth | Our Hearts and Minds

‘Moonstone’ In Gaga’s Garden
Gaga's Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover 'Moonstone'
Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover ‘Moonstone’

Gaga’s Garden Calendar of Roses represented a dream come true. What was so special about that calendar? Here’s the back story: When my picture of a ‘Julia Child’ was chosen for the American Rose Society calendar in 2014, friends asked me, “why don’t you do your own rose calendar?”

Julia Child
Julia Child

What’s In A Name?

The calendar included roses like ‘Elle’, bred by Meilland Roses for the month of April, a rose near and dear to my heart. I planted ‘Elle’ when my first granddaughter was born in her honor. People often want roses that are named for or remind them of themselves, family members friends or celebrities. They ask me to assist them in their search to locate them. The names of roses in the garden are a topic for conversation often on my garden tours. So you see rose names matter.

“He (David C.H. Austin) used to say that the easiest way to kill a rose was to give it a bad name.” ~ Michael Marriott

'Elle' featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,
‘Elle’ featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,

“A rose is an argument. It proclaims the triumph of beauty over brutality, of gentleness over violence, of the ephemeral over the lasting, and of the universal over the particular. The same rose bursts into bloom on the North Cape and in the Sahara Desert.”~Alain Meilland

Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog
Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog

A Rose Garden Says So Much About Who We Are

A rose garden can give one a venue of remembrance, an outlet for stress, a show place for photography, a sorcerer’s delight for alchemy, a veritable rainbow of colors, and a tapestry of fragrance so deep it touches the soul. The delight and knowledge I’ve gained through conversations about names of roses has continued to inspire me. Roses offer a way to softly gain access to the five senses in the garden that then gently whisper thoughts of life and our loved ones worth remembering that only a walk in a rose garden can inspire. Listen and let the garden speak to us. Year!

The Rose Garden
The Rose Garden

The Rose Garden of Fukushima Wins WFRS Literary Award

The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore
The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore
The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore

The Rose Garden of Fukushima

Review: Before and after photos of the Futaba Rose Garden appeared in an article called â€œRoses Abroad”, written by Akira Ogawa in the July/Aug 2013 issue of The American Rose Magazine of The American Rose Society. I was moved, and stricken with such sorrow and grief for Okada, his family and the people of Futaba Town, I contacted the honorable Akira Ogawa expressing my sincere sorrow for their loss due to the Great East Japan Earthquake measuring 9.0 at 2.46 pm on Friday, March 11, 2011. The earthquake, created the tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster at the three Fukushima Daiichi reactors which combined effect of loss and devastation shall be felt for generations. Mr. Akira Ogawa and I have stayed in touch. On New Year’s Eve of 2014, I opened a package from Mr. Ogawa, it was the book called The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore.

The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore
The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore

Mr. Ogawa asked that I write a review of Ms. Moore’s book. Akira translated the following book review for Japanese television to promote Ms. Moore’s amazing work that is an important historical work, lest we forget. And I am grateful that Ms. Moore’s book now has been recognized for the literary work of art & historical relevance it is by the World Federation of Roses by naming ‘The Rose Garden of Fukushima’ their literary award winner of 2018.

The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore

‘The Rose Garden of Fukushima’ “is the story of one of the “countless narratives that unfolded from the momentous tragedies of the great Tohoku Earthquake and explosion at the nuclear plant”. Ms. Moore tells the story of how the Futaba Rose Garden was designed, built and maintained by one man, Katsuhide “Katz” Okada, and his wife Kazuko and their family over the course of 50 years with pictures of the garden before the earthquake and nuclear disaster of March 11, 2011. With pictures of the garden as it stands now after the disaster occurred and its devastating effects on the landscape. It is very raw and powerful.

A Rose Garden on a Sleeping Dragon

Katz began his dream garden when he was only 17, with the support of his father, and would end up “creating an oasis unparalleled in the country, if not the world.” 50,000 people came to visit the rose garden each year in Futaba Town nestled in Japan’s historical Soma region. Ms. Moore’s book is a pictorial of how a little town and its beautiful garden nestled in a pristine setting so close to a sleeping dragon eventually came to be swallowed up by the beast.

“Natural”, “Green”, “Atmospheric”, “Roses”: Foundation Stones

These are the four key concepts Katz called foundation stones, “Natural,” “Green,” “Atmospheric,” and of course “Roses.” His first task was to modulate the space with visual rhythms. This is a powerful force he put in play with Himalayan cedars and vertical design elements. Ms. Moore’s book is a treasure that captures the visual beauty of the garden’s design elements. It also tells the story of what happened on that momentous day in March on another 11th day we have in common with the people of Japan that changed the world forever when this garden and so many lives ceased to exist. In Ms. Moore’s beautiful chronology of the story of the garden as I turned the pages upon reaching page 82, I began to cry at the sight of the garden as it stands today frozen in the despair of that fateful day.

The Archway of The Futaba Rose Garden After the Nuclear Disaster
The Archway of The Futaba Rose Garden After the Nuclear Disaster

The Archway of The Futaba Rose Garden After the Nuclear Disaster

Remnants of the beauty remain draped in an arbor once so beautiful but now poised as if in anguish shown in the picture on page 85. Some of the pictures actually look like a snarled web of destruction, within a wilderness among wisps of frightened loneliness. The pictures on page 87 depict such barrenness and a statue once beautiful frozen as if asking an eternal question of why? Katz was inspired to tell the history of roses to visitors in a chronology from Wild Roses to Modern Roses so visitors would know the history of roses.

The Rose Garden of Fukushima Archway Before
The Rose Garden of Fukushima Archway Before

The History of The Futaba Rose Garden

The history of the garden hold a lesson we need to remember of the fragility of life. Countless people drew beauty and wonder from the Fukushima Rose garden, now this book by Maya Moore captures this story for all time. I am so thankful that the honorable Akira Ogawa sent me The Rose Garden of Fukushima by Maya Moore, and he wrote about Katz Okada and his Fukushima Rose Garden for The American Rose magazine. Ms Moore captured for all time how one man’s dream became a reality, as it was and as it is today so we never forget. All of life is but a vapor that can be gone in an instant, but hope endures in the human spirit and in all living things. Katz at the end was beginning anew with his roses and Ms. Moore tells the story eloquently. Ms. Moore’s book is a beautiful work that I highly recommend.

Futaba Rose Garden Before the Nuclear Disaster and After

Futaba Rose Garden Before the Nuclear Disaster and After
Futaba Rose Garden Before the Nuclear Disaster and After

2019 Note From Akira Ogawa

The Rose Garden of Fukushima Was Nominated as Winner to the WFRS Literary Award
‘The Rose Garden of Fukushima’ by Maya Moore Was Nominated as Winner to the World Federation Literary Award

Author: Maya Moore

Publisher: Sekai Bunka Publishing

Year: 2014

Language: English

ISBN: 978-4418142361

Magnificent photographs and heart-wrenching story about a real rose garden that perished with the meltdown at the Fukushima Nuclear Plant in Japan in 2011.The roses and their demise depict the personal tragedies that are rarely told.

Rose Beauty Wins Over Sustenance

The New Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Garden | Forefront 09-03162
The New Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Garden | Forefront 09-03162

Dating back 40 million years the first trace of roses have been found in fossils discovered in Colorado’s Florissant Fossil. Montana and Oregon have rose fossils dating back 35 million years ago before humans came into existence. Roses have been around since the dawn of time. There’s scientific evidence of roses in extreme Northern climates such as Alaska and Norway. Perceived as a warm weather plant it’s not confirmed that any rose grew in the wild below the equator.

The rose’s origin is believed to be 60-70 million years ago during the Eocene Era in Central Asia, spreading all over the Northern Hemisphere. Discoveries show us that the first civilizations to appreciate and cultivate roses were about 5000 years ago:

First Civilizations To Cultivate Roses

  • Egyptians
  • Chinese
  • Greeks
  • Romans
  • Phoenicians

Confucius, famous Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history tells us that the Chinese Emperor’s library had several hundred books on roses.

The Rose Garden Book On Roses

During the Han Dynasty (207 B.C.-220 A.D.) rose gardening had reached such a peak it encroached upon agricultural lands.

The Chinese Emperor issued an order to plow under some rose gardens!

Contrary to the Chinese Emperor’s edict we plowed under our crops for roses. It’s difficult to admit failure however I’m as allergic to tomato vines as I am to poison ivy! So it didn’t take an issue from a Chinese Emperor to plow under our vegetable crops, it only took a request by Jackson and Perkins to put in test gardens and their 2018-2019 roses.

My therapist, advisor, expert gardener daughter-in-law, as a reader of many gardening Web sites  explained to me, that you, dear reader, would occasionally like to hear of a crop failure. Well dear readers here’s mine: Tomatoes! Since you are used to beautiful rose pictures these pictures come with a warning. You may want to take the kids out of the room, what you are about to see  could be disturbing. 😉

Lone Tomato and the Lion Guarding His Crop

Lone Tomato | Flourishing Proven Winners Hydrangeas | ‘Francis Meilland’ in the background | Expired Tomato on the right

One Tomato Crop Yield

It Didn’t Take An Order From a Chinese Emperor To Convince Me To Put In The Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Gardens

The proliferation of roses continue as of this writing according to Beth Smiley Editor of The American Rose Magazine, the official magazine of the American Rose Society*there are between 60-70,000 named roses. There are Species roses that are roses that have been growing wild for hundreds of thousands of years. Old garden roses are roses that were cultivated before the year 1867. Modern garden roses are the roses that have been introduced since 1867. Within these three groups, roses are divided based on their classes. Class divisions take into account their growth habits, the type of foliage they produce and the form the rose takes when it is fully formed. Jackson & Perkins is working with rose breeders to create roses that are what people tell us they want in their gardens

Hybridizers of roses today are listening to you, the rose gardener while developing better roses. Here’s what people say they want in their roses:

  • Beauty
  • Form
  • Fragrance
  • Easy Care
  • Disease Resistance
  • Variety of Color
  • Choice
  • Hardiness

That’s why we’ve kept a historical diary for years to compare factors that affect roses from season to season. You read above where the Egyptians required the citizens to plow under the roses for their crops, as a rosarian that plowed under the crops of vegetable gardens for the Jackson & Perkins rose trial gardens we’ll be keeping extensive records for you to learn about the best roses for your garden. Here are pictures of the roses.

Trial Roses In The Jackson & Perkins Rose Garden

Jackson & Perkins 10-00454 | Trial Rose Garden

10-01860-A1 Lavender Purple Shrub

09-03162-Floribunda-Salmon Pink
09-03162-Floribunda-Salmon Pink

08-00941-Yellow Grandiflora
08-00941-Yellow Grandiflora

The Newest Rose Garden

Here’s a link to the post showing you other great roses that we’ve put in the garden. We’ve also started a Jackson & Perkins Kordes Roses Sunbelt Garden that includes the Biltmore winner Polar Express Sunbelt. Planted just last April as bare root roses these roses are doing spectacularly with more info for you being gathered. Stay tuned for videos and articles.

‘Desmond Tutu’ Sunbelt a Kordes Rose offered by Jackson & Perkins

Check Out The Best Rose Resource The American Rose Society

If you haven’t checked out the American Rose Society, current President of the American Rose Society, Pat Shanley believes in sustainable rose gardening and is dedicated to every aspect to growing better roses. She also oversees the magazine the “American Rose” magazine, along with Executive Director, Laura Seabaugh. This magazine is completely dedicated to promoting gardening, education, preservation and appreciation of the rose. The American Rose Society is one of the few societies left that continues to publish a print publication 6 times a year along with several newsletters/bulletins and provides each member with a “Handbook for Selecting Roses” and “Creating a Beautiful Rose Garden” booklet. 
 
Former president & rose education advocate Jolene Adams believes that the only way to dispel the myth that roses are difficult to grow is rose growing education. The American Rose Society is dedicated to providing you the gardener with education on how to grow better roses. If you haven’t check them out. Rosarians are standing by to answer your questions. Rose.org 

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Planting A Memorial Day Rose Garden

'Memorial Day' Blooming on a Fall Day in Illinois

Memorial Day Is To Honor Those Who Have Died in America’s Wars

Planting a ‘Memory Garden’ of roses gives you a connection to your loved ones that can keep your memories of them alive. It’s a deeply rewarding endeavor and can be a family project. Here’s how:

  1. Decide who you want to memorialize, perhaps order or make a plaque or bench for spending time and reflection. The Gardens of the American Rose Society offer ways to memorialize loved ones in their rose gardens in Shreveport, LA.
  2. Choose a location with 6-8 hours of sun. Some roses can do fine in partial shade. Both Europeana & Iceberg became covered in partial shade in my Texas rose garden and continued to flourish. This article discusses roses in partial shade by Al Whitcomb.
  3. You can order ‘Memorial Day’ from Jackson & Perkins’ online to plant as a tribute to loved ones. The most often asked question I had at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show is “Where do I find the varieties of roses I have?”, Jackson & Perkins online is an excellent source for Weeks Roses, Star & Certified Roses, since they are wholesale rose growers.
  4. Here are some ideas of roses suitable for a Memory Rose Garden, and ‘Memorial Day’ is a rose that tolerates heat very well. It’s included in the June issue of the American Rose Magazine article I wrote ‘Some Roses Like It Hot’ .
    1. ‘Memorial Day’ The All-America Garden Selections said “This One Is Definitely a ‘Year of the Rose’

      Memorial Day Blooming in the Garden in Illinois
      Memorial Day Blooming in the Garden in Illinois
    2.  ‘Veteran’s Honor’

      'Veterans Honor' Picture 'Veterans' Honor in Peak Form: Picture Taken May 18th, 2017 in Illinois Garden
      ‘Veterans Honor’ Picture ‘Veterans’ Honor’ in Peak Form: Picture Taken May 18th, 2017 in my Illinois Garden
    3. ‘Let Freedom Ring’

      Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns
      Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns
    4. Mr. Lincoln

      Mr. Lincoln photo Tommy Cairns
      Mr. Lincoln photo Tommy Cairns

“We do not know one promise these men made, one pledge they gave, one word they spoke; but we do know they summed up and perfected, by one supreme act, the highest virtues of men and citizens. For love of country they accepted death, and thus resolved all doubts, and made immortal their patriotism and their virtue.”

James A. Garfield
May 30, 1868 Arlington National Cemetery

In 1873, New York was the first state to designate Memorial Day as a legal holiday

During that first national celebration, former Union Gen. and sitting Ohio Congressman James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, after which 5,000 participants helped to decorate the graves. The tradition of laying wreaths on the graves of our soldiers that lost their lives to War is carried out in cemeteries by devoted families all across our great country to this day. In fact many family members place wreaths on graves of veterans that have passed away as well even though Memorial Day is expressly to honor our war dead.

By the late 1800s, cities all across America observed Memorial Day. Several states had declared it a legal holiday, since it was widely established as a national holiday throughout the country.

When Is Memorial Day?*

In 1971, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act and established that Memorial Day was to be celebrated on the last Monday of May. “Memorial Day is celebrated at Arlington National Cemetery each year with a ceremony in which a small American flag is placed on each grave. Traditionally, the President or Vice President lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. About 5,000 people attend the ceremony annually.” 

* PBS.org educating folks on the true meaning of Memorial Day.

Roses Evoke Fond Memories

Memorial Gardens are becoming more popular as a way to honor and pay tribute to those that have passed on. Roses are especially popular as a flower to plant ‘In Loving Memory” because they are a trigger to so many fond memories of loved ones in our life either by their name that is like the loved ones name or our loved ones loved roses as their favorite flower. So this Memorial Day is a good time to plant a Memorial Garden and start your very own Garden of Memories. We’re only a Website away to answer your questions about rose growing. Have a blessed Memorial Day.

American Rose Society,                                                                                                             8877 Jefferson Paige Road                                                                                       Shreveport, LA 71119                                                                                                                           tel: (318) 938-5402                                                                                                                              Contact: Carol Spiers

 

 

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Roses Grow With Love Its A Proven Winning Combo

Intelligent, Pretty Margie Clayman | Landscape Plants

Intelligent, Pretty Margie Clayman | Landscape Plants
Intelligent, Pretty Margie Clayman | Landscape Plants, Petunias

A philanthropist is a person who seeks to promote the welfare of others, especially by the generous donation of their time & money to good causes. Margie Clayman is the quintessential philanthropist.

Proven Winners Oso Easy Rose 'Cherry Pie'
Proven Winners Oso Easy Rose ‘Cherry Pie’

Margie collected me years ago as one of her causes. She took me under her wing when she was host of Tweet Diner, an online Twitter Chat, an eclectic chat on timely topics. At the time I didn’t know the difference between a hashtag and a clothes tag. We have been friends ever since. She has encouraged me at every turn to write more and be all I can be.

Margie Clayman's Adorable Side Kick 'Cumbie'
Margie Clayman’s Adorable Side Kick ‘Cumbie’

If there is a need she fills it if she can. She reminds me of what my mother told me “There is no such thing as a dishonest gardener.”

Margie is an author and a highly regarded marketing strategist. I often wonder how she finds time to be successful career woman, author, crocheter, gardener, cook, sharer of recipes and philanthropist. She crochets blankets and scarves for the victims of disasters and runs Homespun Helpers and the Friendship Bracelet Brigade while working full time as Director of Marketing at Clayman & Associates, LLC, a 60 year old Ohio ad agency based in Marietta, Ohio.

Proven Winners Oso Easy Rose 'Cherry Pie'
Proven Winners Oso Easy Rose ‘Cherry Pie’

To all my American Rose Society friends please welcome Margie to the rose growing world. And visit her charity pages to donate to her causes, they will warm your heart. At Christmas I donated so Margie could knit a scarf for victims of a disaster.

Margie's Container Plants
Margie’s Container Plants

In Texas I had 4 apprentice rose gardeners so when Margie bought her house she and faithful companion ‘Cumbie’ wanted to add landscaping. It was time to bring Margie into the fold of rose garden apprentices. It seemed Proven Winners Oso Easy Series of Roses are the perfect choice for our busy philanthropist and her side-kick Cumbie*

Margie | 'Cherry Pie' Rose
Margie | ‘Cherry Pie’ Rose

*Cumbie is named for Sherlock of the PBS series star Benedict Cumberbatch we both were quite taken with.

Proven Winners Oso Easy 'Lemon Zest' Shrub Rose
Proven Winners Oso Easy ‘Lemon Zest’ Shrub Rose

*Margie Clayman is the Director of Marketing, B2B Client Services at Marietta-based Clayman & Associates, LLC. Margie also runs the charitable organization Homespun Helpers  and is currently running a project called The Friendship Bracelet. You can follow Margie on Twitter @margieclayman.

“The soul is healed by being with children.” ~Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Being In The Garden With Children and Your Pets ~ Susan Fox