Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by MN Rose Specialist Deb Kaiser

Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser
Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser
Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser, Expert on Construction Blanket Cold Weather Rose Care, With Jack Falker, The Minnesota Rose Gardener

Winter in Minnesota is a force to be reckoned with. Rose Specialist of the Munsinger & Clemens Gardens St. Cloud, Minnesota, Ms. Deb Kaiser, has found a kinder gentler way to wrap it up. The following is a Guest Post by Deb Kaiser.

Let It Snow | Snow Provides Isolation for Roses
Let It Snow | Snow Provides Isolation for Roses

Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by Deb Kaiser, Rose Specialist

With cooler weather in the forecast I have started to prepare my home rose garden, and the public rose garden that I work for, ready for what might be an early winter. In late August, I stopped fertilizing the roses with nitrogen. I deadheaded the shrub roses one last time. Now, I am letting them form rose hips and harden off for the winter. We have had lots of heavy rain this season. Much of it has been at night and our weather has been cooler, so blackspot has been a problem. I will continue to spray the roses every 2 weeks with a systemic fungicide Honor Guard (a generic for BannerMaxx) and Manzate fungicide both of which I purchase from Rosemania.

Construction Blanket Covered Roses
Construction Blanket Covered Roses

Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by Deb Kaiser, Rose Specialist

With cooler weather in the forecast I have started to prepare my home rose garden, and the public rose garden that I work for, ready for what might be an early winter. In late August, I stopped fertilizing the roses with nitrogen. I deadheaded the shrub roses one last time. Now, I am letting them form rose hips and harden off for the winter. We have had lots of heavy rain this season. Much of it has been at night and our weather has been cooler, so blackspot has been a problem. I will continue to spray the roses every 2 weeks with a systemic fungicide Honor Guard (a generic for BannerMaxx) and Manzate fungicide both of which I purchase from Rosemania.

Jack Falker | The Minnesota Rose Gardener | Assisting Deb Kaiser With the Project
Jack Falker | The Minnesota Rose Gardener

So what can we do to help protect them from early winter temperatures and winds? One of the things that I am starting to do now is to feed the roses potassium, as a drench. I am following the recommendations of Twin Cities Rose Club member, Minnesota Rose Gardener, Jack Falker Please see Jack’s August & October 2012 blogs on the potassium feast for roses at http://jack-rosarian.blogspot.com.

Minnesota Roses Mulched Pruned Knee High | Ready To Cover
Minnesota Roses Mulched Pruned Knee High | Ready To Cover

Good winter protection methods are a must for zone 3 and 4 Minnesota winters. There are three main functions of winter protection – to keep the temperature high enough to prevent winter kill, to keep the temperature low enough to keep the roses dormant, and to protect the roses from drying and withering of canes caused by winter sun and wind. So what roses need winter protection? I winter protect all tender roses that are not hardy to zone 3.

Goose Girl in Snow
Goose Girl in Snow

Which roses to protect and the winter protection method to use depends on the degree of hardiness of the variety of rose. There are many cold hardy varieties of old garden and shrub roses that need no additional cover. They include albas, centifolias, damasks, gallicas, species roses, rugosas, Explorers, Parkland, some Buck Roses, and most Bailey’s Easy Elegance roses. There are varying degrees of hardiness within the cold hardy roses. Tip hardiness is where there is minimal winter dieback out to the tips of the rose canes. My Jens Munk and John Davis shrub roses always come to mind when I talk about tip hardy roses. These two roses require no cover. Their long canes can be seen sticking out of the snow banks. In the spring, they are the first of my shrub roses to leaf out. Crown hardiness is when the rose dies back to the ground. In spring, the plant sends out new shoots at ground level.

Easy Elegance 'Sunrise Sunset Rose'
Easy Elegance ‘Sunrise Sunset Rose’ introduced at the IGC Show in Chicago

My Bailey’s Easy Elegance roses may do this. There are varying degrees of hardiness in between. With good mulch and snow cover, most of my Easy Elegance and Northern Accents roses die back to somewhere between tip and ground levels.

Roses Mulched and Partially Covered
Roses Mulched and Partially Covered

Crown hardy roses need some mulch or other cover such as soil and leaves or marsh hay. Tender roses such as non-hardy (zone 5 and higher shrubs), hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas, minifloras, and miniatures need a good winter protection method.

Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s
Roses Covered w/Construction Blankets Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s

Winter rose protection starts with good summer rose care. Healthy plants survive the winter better — so water, fertilize, and spray for disease during the summer. Discontinue deadheading and using nitrogen fertilizer in late August to allow the roses to harden off for winter. Continue watering the roses into fall. Plant your tender roses in a sheltered location away from drying winds. Plant the bud union on grafted roses 2 to 4 inches below ground level. Choose varieties that are naturally hardy to zone 4 or less.

A winter protection method that is recommended for Minnesota winters, and was used at the Virginia Clemens Rose Garden in St Cloud, is the Minnesota Tip Method. Tender rose varieties are fatally damaged in temperatures below 20 degrees F. Late winter and early spring freeze and thaws can also cause damage. In 1954, Albert Nelson tried a method that he had observed raspberry growers using.

The Munsinger & Clemons Gardens Mulched and Blanketed
The Munsinger & Clemons Gardens Mulched and Blanketed

He tipped his roses and covered them with soil. This method of winter rose protection later became known as the Minnesota Tip Method. It was first demonstrated at an ARS Convention in Omaha in 1966.

The Minnesota Tip Method starts in mid to late October before temperatures drop below 20 degrees F. Spray the roses with a dormant spray such as Lime Sulfur or fungicides such as BannerMaxx and Manzate. Clean up the rose beds, removing dropped leaves and mulch, and remove diseased leaves on the plants to avoid overwintering of disease. Do not prune until spring, as pruning encourages new growth. Tie up the rose canes with orange poly twine, leaving a long tail. This makes the roses easier to tip and bury. The orange twine is easier to see when digging up the roses in the spring. Long lanky canes can be trimmed to make tying easier. Use pruning sealer on the cuts. Using a shovel, dig a trench as long as the rose is high, and wide enough to fit the tied rose. More than one tipped rose can be laid in the same trench. Use a spading fork to pull away the soil from the shank of the rose (below the bud union and above the roots) and loosen the soil around the plant. Dig carefully to avoid damaging the plant or its roots. Use the spading fork to push the rose into the trench. REMEMBER – only the roots bend. Pull more soil away from the shank to make it easier for the roots to bend. Hold the rose down while you cover it with 2 to 3 inches of soil. Add soil from other areas of the garden, if needed to cover the rose. Water the rose beds well to prevent winter drying of roots and canes. After the ground has frozen, cover the rose beds with 2 to 3 feet of leaves or marsh hay. Place several tin cans of rodent bait under the covering to prevent damage from chewing animals. Water the covering well to prevent fire and hold the covering in place. Loosely bagged leaves or insulated construction blankets can also be used as a covering.

Another method of winter rose protection is mounding up the base with 9 to 12 inches of soil. Use a wire cylinder to hold the soil in place. Don’t trim the rose unless necessary. Stuff the cylinder with leaves or marsh hay and cover the entire bed with a 2 foot depth of leaves or marsh hay. Water the rose bed well.

Pictures below is a shrub rose protected with leaves and boards.

Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s
Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s

Note: The American Rose Society does not recommend the use of rose cones for zone 3 and 4 winters

The method of winter rose protection that I have used at home for the past eight years and at work for the past five winters is to cover the rose beds with insulated construction blankets. In mid-October, I cut back the roses to a height of 8 inches. Next, the roses are mulched heavily with several shovel scoops of compost, covering the graft and extending 1 ½ feet on each side of the plant. This year I added coffee grounds to my compost. When nighttime temperatures are consistently in the 30 degree F. range, I add rodent bait and cover the entire rose bed with R-value 7.48 insulated construction blankets. This should be done before temperatures drop below 20 degrees F. Blanket edges and overlaps are bricked down tightly and closely with many bricks. Avoid leaving gaps where air can get in. The blankets look like two tarps sewn together with a thick bat of insulation in the middle. The blankets come in two sizes – 6 foot wide by 25 feet long and 12 feet wide by 25 feet long. The shiny side of the blanket should face down toward the ground.

A method of winter protection that I use for overwintering potted roses is to put them in my attached garage. I spray the plant with fungicide and water it well. Next, I put it in a heavy weight, black garbage bag.

I tie the bag loosely to avoid mildew due to moisture build up. The roses are stored, off the floor.


Potted roses can also be laid on their sides and covered with insulated blankets or trenched and buried.
and away from drafts, in an unheated garage or room with temperatures between 20 and 40 degrees F.

Construction Blanket Covered Minnesota Roses Uncovered Showing Green in March Zone 3b as They Are Uncovered
Construction Blanket Covered Minnesota Roses Uncovered Showing Green in March Zone 3b as They Are Uncovered

In spring, I start removing the rose covering around April 1st. Rose coverings such as leaves, marsh hay, and soil, should be removed in layers as it thaws. About April 15th, I check to see if the soil is thawed enough to raise tipped roses to an upright position without damaging them. After the roses are tipped up and secured firmly in place, water the canes several times per day to avoid drying out from spring winds. Once buds form, fertilize the roses with a balanced rose fertilizer. Prune the roses after buds form and the plant is actively growing. Spray the roses regularly with a fungicide after leaves form.

A Garden Is A Place For Kids & Seeds To Bloom

Sakata Seed Company's Alecia Troy
Weeding
Oui One Weeds

“I had to beg my Mother-In-Law to give me the Seedkeeper Deluxe Seed Organizer, and I’m glad I did! I just love how easy it is to organize and find my Sakata Seeds! What a useful garden tool!  ~      Tanna Fox

Sakata Seeds and The SeedKeepers Deluxe Seed Organizer Kit is a marriage made in heaven!

The Seed Keeper Deluxe Organization System Showing some Formosa Liliy Seeds I received from Diane LaSauce at #G2B15 at P. Allen Smith's
The Seed Keepers’ Deluxe Seed Organizing System |D LaSauces’ Formosa Lily Seeds from P. Allen Smith’s #G2B15 | The Boss (aka my Daughter-In-Law) now has it to organize the Sakata Seeds for the Kids’ Garden

Last month the Sakata Seeds folks did a demo at P.Allen Smith’s Garden 2 Blog 2015 at his Moss Mountain Farm in Little Rock, Arkansas. They idea struck me while Tracy Lee was doing her presentation that these seeds are so precious what could be more perfect than the Seedkeeper Deluxe for organizing the seeds?!

Sakata Seed Company's Alecia Troy
Sakata Seed Company’s Tracy Lee along with Alecia Troy Were at #G2B15

Have you ever opened a seed packet and then the remains are scattered about who knows where? And its difficult to keep track of what’s what? Or have you ever planted the perfect seed and then not been able to recall or find the packet it came from? Those days are over with the invention of a product like this from entrepreneurs and friends Kerrie Rosenthal and Carol Niec, who I met at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show speakers reception planned by Bruce Bailey and La Manda Joy, author of  “Start A Community Food Garden.”

The Seed Keepers at Gaga's Garden
The Seed Keepers at Gaga’s Garden in Illinois Visiting

The Seed Keepers at Gaga’s Garden in Illinois Visiting

These lovely women and my beautiful daughter-in-law who by the way is the ‘boss of me’ are the reason I am planting vegetable gardens now. Oh…that and a few episodes of the Doomsday Preppers.  They invented the perfect system and gave me their Deluxe Kit as a house gift for inviting them to stay a few days and go out on the pontoon boat. Teasing Kerrie and Carol I always tell them you plant the seeds and send me plants!

TannaTessaW15“I wish I had this before we moved from Texas. I threw out hundreds of seeds because I didn’t know what they were! At the time it was easier to toss them than to try and organize them.”

~ Tanna Fox

Well, The Boss, aka, my daughter-in-law and I are planting a Special Needs Kids Garden. The Seedkeepers and my blessed daughter-in-law are the reason I started growing lettuce and all sorts of edibles again. You can tweet or ask Kerrie, I had to tweet her this question one night while we were online chatting about gardening: “How do I harvest my lettuce?” I love these Movie Star Seedkeeper Girls! They know everything about seeds! And remember you can eat roses but they will not sustain ‘Big Daddy’ for long! He eats real food

The kids in a tree
The kids in a tree

My grandson has Down Syndrome and is a blessing to us all. He loves to work on projects and especially in the garden. The future of gardening is in the hands of the next generation and especially those with special needs. With that said we, “the Boss” and I have started the “Special Needs Kids Garden, ” in her yard zone 7a.

Say What? Healthy Food from The Garden?!
Say What? Healthy Food from The Garden?!

Tanna was ecstatic to receive the Sakata Seeds, the deluxe SeedKeepers  storage kit and so the fun begins. Erik loves to go exploring for plants in the shade so we need ideas for shade plants and edibles that work well growing in perhaps 4 hours of shade.

Texas Kid's Garden
Texas Kid’s Garden | Where We Started

Planning and putting in your own kids garden is to bring your family together. Often times special needs kids feel isolated. Gardening and working in the garden can give a child a sense of community. We welcome ideas about plants kids love to grow and how you are getting your kids involved in gardening, especially special needs kids. We will be working in USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map 7a.

A Garden Is A Gathering Place
A Garden Is A Gathering Place

Be sure to go there first and put in your zip code to get your plant hardiness zone to know what types of plants are best for your area.  Ideas for plants and your experiences are welcome. Don’t forget I’m on Twitter as @gagasgarden, facebook pages are www.facebook.com/gagasgarden and /gagasgardens and gardenlegends. Tell ‘The Boss’ and me what’s going on in your Kid’s Garden and especially invite Special Needs Kids to participate.

TractorBoy_W15Our wonderful boy is speech delayed yet he has understood everything said to him from an early age. He can become frustrated and upset trying to communicate. Folks can misinterpret his language delay and underestimate his intelligence. This my friends can be a big mistake. Let’s Get it started.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gidding
John Gidding, Bruce Bailey, Amanda Davis

Thank-you Tony, Bruce, and LaManda, whose books are an excellent resource for learning about community garden projects.

Tony Abruscato | Abana Jacobs | The W
Tony Abruscato | Abana Jacobs | The W | CFGS Speaker Reception planned by Bruce Bailey and LaManda Joy

 

 

 

Miracle on the Pier

The 'Classic Rose Garden' at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show

“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”
― Albert Einstein

Weeks Roses in Bloom
Weeks Roses in Bloom

They said it couldn’t be done. I was almost convinced myself that we weren’t going to have a rose garden at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show – in March – in bloom. Then Show Director, Tony Abruscato and I sat down with Weeks Roses Sales Manager, Karen Kemp-Docksteader at the Independent Garden Show last August.

Tony Abruscato | Susan Fox in the Rose Garden
Tony Abruscato | Susan Fox in the Rose Garden

Karen told us that Weeks Roses would provide all the roses we would need, but we needed to locate a greenhouse to force them into bloom by March. The process of forcing roses requires a white paper alone. That’s another story altogether.

AC_W15

Then Star Roses and Plants, Vice President License and New Business Development, Jacque Ferare and his team that include Tim Wood and Kyle McKean said that their company would also provide Star Roses and force all of the roses into bloom at their greenhouses in Michigan. The next thing you know Tony had brilliant Landscape Architect, Scott A Mehaffey with a design for the garden. Sprinkle in some magic dust from folks like Matthias Meilland from the most distinguished, oldest family of roses in the world and things begin to bloom.

Landscape Architect, Scott Mehaffey, Designer, Rosarian Nathan Beckner
Landscape Architect, Scott Mehaffey, Designer, Rosarian Nathan Beckner

Scott requested that creative rosarian genius Nathan Beckner of Gethsemane Gardens take a leading role with this project. This man talks to roses and they obey. I know this to be true. Nathan engaged Ted’s Greenhouse to force his roses that include some of the most beautiful David Austin Roses I have ever seen. Nathan’s David Austin ‘Shropshire Lad’ captured everyone’s heart as it swept over the arbor, a magical sight for Illinoisans winter weary eyes. To know Nathan Beckner is to love him.

'Shropshire Lad' by David Austin Roses, Nathan Beckner's Rose at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show in bloom in March
‘Shropshire Lad’ by David Austin Roses, Nathan Beckner’s Rose at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show in bloom in March

Nathan was at the show before it opened, watering and dead-heading the plants, staying as a docent, pruning roses and then he went to his full-time job. If you live near Gethsemene Garden Center you have one of the nation’s leading rosarians, Nathan Beckner as a consultant. If you love roses and gardens at flower shows then we owe these companies a tremendous debt, paid in gratitude, respect and our business. A way to honor these folks and be sure we have future rose gardens at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show  is to give them your business because many of them worked at the show on their own time as volunteers.

Steve Sanger, Renowned Rose Hybridizer working with Laura Seabaugh at the ARS Table
Steve Sanger, Renowned Rose Hybridizer with Laura Seabaugh at the ARS Table

Landscape Architect and Founder of American Gardens, Jerry Milewski, built the garden and was there almost every day working as a volunteer answering questions from very gracious and grateful visitors. Even the Chicago Botanic Garden Master Horticulturist, Tom Soulsby (who I interviewed for the 2014 American Rose Society Annual for the article I wrote on the Krasburg Rose Garden) volunteered for a day and worked at the rose garden. John Beaty of Mills Magic was there opening night. We are so proud to have him as our organic fertilizer sponsor. And just think about the amount of organic soil that Mark Highland, of Organic Mechanics had to bring in for gardens like this. And yes I use his soil and I love it.

Susan Fox | John Beaty | Laura Seabaugh
Susan Fox | John Beaty | Laura Seabaugh

The American Rose Society (ARS) worked with me at record speeds, accomplishing coverage of volunteer Consulting Rosarians for the entire show to answer any questions the public might have about roses. Analytic Director for Mesa Boogie, Michael Fox provided me with the solution for tracking our volunteers. Thank-you Michael. And we have to thank Jolene Adams, Pat Shanley and Jeffrey Ware of the American Rose Society for providing material and sending Laura Seabaugh and her close friend Yvonne Matherne who worked at the show right beside me as crowds filled our rose garden throughout the show. ARS President, Jolene Adams was the first person I asked if she thought this project was feasible. She was my behind the scenes coach and a cheerleader every step of the way. ARS, Vice President Pat Shanley is the most generous, fast acting, get things done person I’ve ever seen working through and with Jeffry Ware and Laura Seabaugh to make things happen.

Julia Child in Bloom
Julia Child in Bloom

So you see roses bloomed in Chicago thanks to all these wonderful folks for the first time in over ten years.

Gardeners attending the show saw that roses are easy to grow, require minimal care, are long living, and resilient. The American Rose Society (ARS) Director of Membership, Laura Seabaugh assisted as we coordinated ARS volunteer docents Consulting Rosarians available throughout the show at the rose gardens to answer questions about rose growing any attendees may have.

ApricotW15
‘Apricot Candy’ Glowing as it springs into bloom

Pictures are truly worth a thousand words. Here are the Star and Weeks Roses that we had at the show.

Star Roses on Parade
Star Roses on Parade

Star Roses and Plants

Dee-Lish

Pink Flamingo

Eternal Flame

Apricot Candy

Sunshine Daydream

Greenmark PR President, Sue Markgraf
Greenmark PR President, Sue Markgraf next to David Austin climbing rose in bloom

Weeks Roses

Anna’s Promise

Cinco De Mayo

Julia Child

Jump for Joy

Koko Loko

Oh My!

Fairy Garden That Delighted Everyone Young and Old
Fairy Garden That Delighted Everyone Young and Old

The Fairy Garden

Garden Wise Living designed the Fairy Garden.  We had miniature roses within the design to delight gardeners and children alike. The Fairy Garden was so popular with young and old alike. twitter ID is @greenblessings.

A Thought to Leave You With

The CEO of  Tom’s Shoes, Tom Mycoskie, Founder of One for One said he didn’t “wake up one day knowing he could change the world.” (paraphrased) But he is changing the world providing shoes for people all over the world one pair of shoes at a time. Read his story folks and if you don’t think Mom wants a rose bush for Mother’s Day buy her a pair of Tom’s shoes and know you just put a pair of shoes on the feet of people who may never have had a pair of shoes, or maybe buy her a rose bush and a pair of Tom’s Shoes*

David Austin Roses
David Austin Roses

Special thanks to Certified Roses, Mills Magic and Sue Markgraf and Gina Tedesco of Greenmark PR who were absolutely amazing through this show. Sue Markgraf is world class.

disclaimer: I don’t own a pair of Tom’s shoes. Tom doesn’t know me, my Web site nor has he ever heard of me.  My granddaughter has a pair. I read his story this week when @MargieClayman posted his blog and I think he is a great man with a wonderful mission.

Anna's Promise in Bloom at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show
Anna’s Promise in Bloom at The Chicago Flower & Garden Show

More Pictures

Nathan Beckner on the far right with docent and show attendees
Nathan Beckner on the far right with docent and show attendees

And The Hat

The Hat my darling daughter-in-law picked out for me sight un-seen of the color of my jacket and it was perfect!
The Hat my darling daughter-in-law picked out for me sight un-seen of the color of my jacket and it was perfect!

Oso Easy Ice Princess Roses Reign | Proven Winners

Oso Easy 'Italian Ice by Proven Winners
Oso Easy 'Mango Salsa' by Proven Winners captured in all the glory of a late fall bloom
Oso Easy ‘Mango Salsa’ by Proven Winners captured in all the glory of a late fall bloom

Fall of 2013 was the first time I planted roses in the fall.

Oso Easy Shrub Roses by Proven Winners are the first roses I ever planted in the fall of 2013. There is no particular reason.. Growing up on the beautiful north shore of Lake Michigan in Illinois, spring was just more conducive to planting roses than fall in my mind. Winters were so harsh one didn’t seem to be in their right mind to plant a rose then immediately have to bury it. It was the fall of 2013 that I was invited to Minneapolis to speak at the Twin Cities Rose Club that I met Dr. David Zlesak who has done extensive work in developing winter hardy, disease resistant ‘Oso Happy’ roses. And like any good idea, now that I had moved from Texas back to Illinois planting roses in the fall seemed like an idea whose time has come.
Oso Easy 'Italian Ice by Proven Winners
Oso Easy ‘Italian Ice by Proven Winners a rainbow tapestry of color.
When I returned home I received a parcel with roses from Dr. Zlesak’s personal test rose garden. Thus began my foray into the world of fall rose planting.
Oso Easy 'Paprika' by Proven Winners captured in a late fall bloom.
Oso Easy ‘Paprika’ by Proven Winners captured in a late fall bloom.
What I didn’t know at the time that the winter of 2013 would be the 3rd coldest winter on record in parts of the Midwest and an ideal test for winter hardiness of my new rose plants.
Oso Easy 'Smoothie' by Proven Winners
Oso Easy ‘Smoothie’ by Proven Winners
Oso Happy® Pink Cupcake
Series One: Oso Happy® roses
All bred by David Zlesak:
·         Oso Happy® Candy Oh!
·         Oso Happy® Petit Pink
·         Oso Happy® Smoothie
Series Two: Oso Easy® roses
Varieties bred by Chris Warner, UK:
·         Oso Easy® Fragrant Spreader
·         Oso Easy® Honey Bun
·         Oso Easy® Italian Ice
·         Oso Easy® Lemon Zest
·         Oso Easy® Mango Salsa
·         Oso Easy® Paprika
·         Oso Easy® Pink Cupcake
Varieties bred by the late Colin Horner, UK:
·         Oso Easy® Peachy Cream
·         Oso Easy® Strawberry Crush
Varieties developed by Meilland, France
·         Oso Easy® Cherry Pie
·         Oso Easy® Double Red (new to retail 2015)*
*Thank-you to Shannon Springer of Proven Winners for providing this information

 

Please plan on visiting The Chicago Flower and Garden Show March 14-22, 2015. We will have a rose garden featuring every type of Star Roses and Plants and Weeks Roses as well as Proven Winners Plants, and rosarians to answer questions. I will be speaking Saturday, March 14th on Landscaping with Roses | Roses That Love Where You Live at 2:00 PM. If you are a rosarian and want to be there at the rose garden to anser questions email me for a free pass.
I will also be speaking Saturday, March 21st at 11:00 on Miniature Roses.
Richard Anthony and Brenna Bosch of For Love of Roses  will be there along with 100’s of their Minaiture Roses in a rose garden setting designed by our top Chicago designers.
Richard will also be a featured speaker. Stay tuned for the time and date.
 

 

Four Seasons of Roses

Gaga's Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover 'Moonstone'

Garden Legends Live On By Designs & Impressions They Leave on The Earth | Our Hearts and Minds

Gaga's Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover 'Moonstone'
Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015 Calendar Cover ‘Moonstone’

Gaga’s Garden Calendar of Roses represents a dream come true. What’s so special about this calendar? Here’s the back story: When my picture of a spray of ‘Julia Child’ was chosen for the American Rose Society calendar in 2014, folks asked me, “why don’t you do your own rose calendar?”

Julia Child
Julia Child

So I present you Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015. It includes roses like ‘Elle’, for the month of April, a rose near and dear to my heart. I planted ‘Elle’ when my granddaughter Gabrielle was born. She now has a little sister named Ella, so now its doubly meaningful to me. People tell me they want roses that are named for or remind them of themselves, friends, family members or celebrities all the time, and ask me to assist them in their search to locate them. The names of roses in the garden are always a topic for conversation on garden tours. So you see rose names matter.

'Elle' featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,
‘Elle’ featured for the month of April, 2015 with a quote from Alain Meilland, Meilland Roses International,

 

“A rose is an argument. It proclaims the triumph of beauty over brutality, of gentleness over violence, of the ephemeral over the lasting, and of the universal over the particular. The same rose bursts into bloom on the North Cape and in the Sahara Desert.”~Alain Meilland

 

Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog
Neil Diamond, new from Weeks Roses 2015 Cataolog

Over the years people have taught me that a garden says so much about who we are. A rose garden can give one a venue of remembrance, an outlet for stress, a show place for photography, a sorcerers delight for alchemy, a veritable rainbow of colors, and a tapestry of fragrance so deep it touches the soul. The delight and knowledge I’ve gained through conversations about names of roses has continued to inspire me. Roses offer a way to softly gain access to the five senses in the garden that then gently whisper thoughts of life and our loved ones worth remembering that only a walk in a rose garden can inspire. Listen and let the garden speak to us. Let us count the ways on your calendar of Gaga’s Garden Roses 2015 . Happy New Year! Click on this link to buy the calendar. Happy New Year!

Don’t forget 10% of profits are donated to the American Rose Society.

The Rose Garden
The Rose Garden