Rapid Results With Floribunda Roses

Floribunda Rose Garden | Before and After

There are many reasons to start over; a new job, starting a career, or to be close to family. You may have a vacation home or want to downsize but still want to garden. We moved back to Illinois because we both grew up in Illinois. Our work situations had provided us with the opportunity to travel extensively to every state in the union. During my husband’s travel he decided he loved Illinois and there’s no place on earth he would rather be. A corporate transfer for me from Chicago to New York City, then Plano, Texas resulted in building a home in Plano, Texas in 1987 and acquiring over 200 roses by 2011. In 2011 we decided at that point we had acquired the house in Central Illinois and the house in Plano, Texas and thought rather than keep working all the time to support two homes and that lifestyle we would downsize and start over in Illinois.

Geese Girls Ready For Halloween

Starting Over Offers New Opportunities

You may not go willingly, but once you set your mind to it, the change may be filled with new opportunities. We sold the Texas home and moved to Illinois from Texas in 2011 leaving behind rose gardens that I had invested heart and soul creating. The Illinois property sits on 3 1/2 acres of rolling sandy loam hills, and did not have a single rose. Leaving behind the rose gardens in Plano, Texas (the safest city in America of its size unless you’re my kidnapped lawn decorations) that took 20 years to collect, I wanted to put in a rose garden that would get the quickest results. I decided to put rose gardens in in stages and share it with you dear readers.

Dr. & Mrs. Keith Zary & me at the Biltmore Rose Trials & Dr. Zary's Rose 'Kimberlina'
Dr. & Mrs. Keith Zary Biltmore Rose Trials & Dr. Zary’s Rose ‘Kimberlina’ in the Floribunda Rose Garden | For Profusion of Bloom | Rapid Results | Plant Floribundas

Floribunda Roses Offer Quick Results

That type rose garden that gets quick results is a floribunda rose garden. Floribundas are known for their ability to bear flowers in large clusters and profusion of bloom. Another advantage floribunda roses have is their ability to bloom continually whereas hybrid teas exhibits a bloom cycle every six to seven weeks. Let me give you a little back story here, this Illinois property is located 40 miles from Starbucks and 80 miles from Home Depot. *  So to locate my new roses I thought I would just pull up the list of roses online from a large garden center like I did in the DFW area, order my roses and have them delivered. Now I have come to learn a valuable lesson the hard way, or I would have dug up quite a few roses I probably will never be able to locate again. And also a large segment of the population that want roses like I grow don’t live in large Metro areas.

Displays Everywhere of Lovely Star Roses Knock® Out Roses
Displays Everywhere of Lovely Star Roses Knock® Out Roses

From 3 minutes from a Starbucks to 40 miles

Now after living in Plano, Texas; a totally consumer centric life style driven by hopping in the car for a 3 minute drive to Starbucks for coffee, Whole Foods, and Central Market type of living to being 15 miles from Walmart I was in culture shock. A friend down the street said his son told him “Susan and Richard are in the witness protection program.” His dad asked him why would he think that? He said “Why else after all the wonderful cities that they’ve lived would they ever move to Ramsey?” Susan what’s your point? They don’t sell potted fancy rose bushes out here either. Can you imagine my shock trying to find a landscape center that sold potted hybrid teas? I called the nearest landscape center 40 miles away and asked if they carried hybrid teas and the answer to my question was “what’s that?”. You see there are trade-offs to my ‘Green Acres’, lifestyle. And I’m not saying starting over is always easy. Nothing worth doing is ever easy, but it has been worth it.

'Gene Boerner' a floribunda rose named for the man that worked his entire life for Jackson & Perkins 'aka' as 'Papa Floribunda', he hybridized more than 60 roses.
‘Gene Boerner’ a floribunda rose named for the man that worked his entire life for Jackson & Perkins ‘aka’ as ‘Papa Floribunda’, he hybridized more than 60 roses. #myjproses

Come To ‘Papa’! ‘Papa Floribunda’ ‘Gene Boerner’ That Is

So now you see why when I spotted ‘Gene Boerner’ at Rural King, in September of 2011, I was shocked and nearly shed a tear. They carry primarily  Star Roses ‘KnockOut®’ roses, which I love also but I wanted more than only ‘KnockOuts’®. They had very little selection in hybrid tea or floribunda roses, so to see one ‘Gene Boerner’ which has a stellar reputation and came out in 1968 and is still rated in the ARS* Handbook of Selecting Roses an 8.2 I grabbed it and planted it as the first floribunda in my Illinois floribunda garden.

Who Was ‘Gene Boerner’?

Once I looked up the history of ‘who is Gene Boerner’ the irony wasn’t lost on me. ‘Gene Boerner’ is known as ‘Papa Floribunda’. A jovial man he worked his entire life at Jackson & Perkins where he hybridized more than 60 roses! I’m so glad the first rose in our floribunda rose garden was and is ‘Gene Boerner.’ Known as ‘Papa Floribunda’ of Jackson & Perkins ‘Gene Boerner’ is symbolic to me for many reasons. Jackson & Perkins is a brand that is symbolic to America for roses. ‘Gene Boerner’, Floribunda you see pictured here is one of the first roses to bloom each spring. It’s disease resistant, has a fabulous shape, color, it blooms in clusters and lasts forever.

Sometimes Back To Basics Is Best

Soon I realized the remaining roses I wanted were available online. Many folks don’t realize that their garden centers order their roses from growers bare root and get them early in the season and pot them in containers so they leaf out by the time the weather is lovely and spring like when we are ready to shop in the garden centers for our potted roses. Years ago when I first started growing roses all the roses I planted were barefoot that I got from my local Northeast Rose Society. If you haven’t checked out your local rose society please do folks because most members are willing to help you and share their knowledge. When I was new to growing roses, rose society senior members would stop by my house and make sure I had all my questions answered and that was way back when I was in my twenties living along the North Shore of Lake Michigan north of Chicago. What’s important in the roses you get is the grade and how many healthy canes are on the rose bush. Be sure you have at least three healthy canes.

Floribunda Rose Garden | Before and After
Floribunda Rose Garden | Before and After

The Illinois Floribunda Rose Garden

So here are the stages of the first rose garden in Illinois, beginning with Jackson & Perkins ‘Gene Boerner’ then I found their exclusive ‘Kimberlina’, ‘Iceberg’, I planted bare root, ‘Betty Boop’, ‘Playboy’, ‘Sunsprite’ and ‘Rainbow Sorbet’,

Garden Legends Live On By Designs & Impressions They Leave on The Earth | Our Hearts and Minds

‘Iceberg’ Floribunda Rose next to ‘Kimberlina’ Floribunda Rose

Garden Legends, please check out my page on Facebook, are stories about people, plants, & companies and how their passion for creating better, more beautiful, easy to grow plants will live on as a tribute to them by rooting and grounding beautiful plants across the land in the hearts and gardens of people everywhere. Along with Gene Boerner, two of the most notable American Rose Breeders; Bill Warriner often called “the No.1 rose breeder in the United States and Dr. Keith Zary have created the most famous roses today while at Jackson & Perkins. 

Sunsprite' One of the First Floribunda Roses Planted | Quick Results | Happy Color
‘Sunsprite’ One of the First Floribunda Roses Planted | Quick Results | Happy Color

Rose Legends: ‘Papa Floribunda’, Bill Warriner, & Dr. Keith Zary created 100’s & 100’s of the World’s Best Roses of Today while at Jackson & Perkins

While working with Jackson & Perkins Roses,  – at the time a nearly 80-year-old rose propagation company in Newark known for its award-winning roses named for famous people, Warriner introduced the prize-winning hybrids ‘Gay Princess’, ‘Gene Boerner’ and ‘First Prize’.

He later won 19 All-America awards for his rose introductions still while working on Jackson & Perkins hybrids.

His hybridizing accomplishments were outstanding. In his job as overseer of some 100,000 seedlings in the Jackson & Perkins research facility in Irvine, CA where he developed new rose strains, he became the only rose hybridizer in the 40-year-old All-American Rose Society to win All-American honors for three new breeds, Love, Honor and Cherish, in one year, 1980. I planted all three in my Plano, Texas garden.

'First Prize' Grows the size of salad plates in the Texas Garden
‘First Prize’ Grows the size of salad plates in the Texas Garden

Trust Roses That Have Won Multiple Awards by the World’s Best Rose Breeders

Bill Warriner retired as director of Jackson & Perkins research after working with the company for 25 years and developing 150 varieties of roses! His creations have continued to gain prestige since his retirement. Bill Warriner passed away at the age of 69 in 1991.

Dr. Zary is only the second US rose breeder to win the President’s International Trophy (PIT) and Gold Medal Award of the Royal National Rose Society. The rose that won is called ‘Greetings’, a white centered, purple shrub/landscape-type rose that is currently not available in the US, but is sold in England.

Another one of the first roses I planted in the Illinois floribunda garden is a rose exclusive to Jackson & Perkins called ‘Kimberlina’ bred by Dr. Keith Zary. Why is this important to you? Because we want you to be successful with the roses you buy and plant. The American Rose Society requested we review some roses in our garden. Here are some of the the roses of the season that are the first to bloom: with a video of ‘Kimberlina’ to show hundreds if not a thousand buds ready to burst into bloom. http://If you want lush candelabras of roses, rapid bloom cycles, and a rose garden to enjoy for color and the joy of being in your own rose garden you want floribundas.

*If you haven’t checked out the American Rose Society, current President of the American Rose Society, Pat Shanley believes in sustainable rose gardening and is dedicated to every aspect to growing better roses. She also oversees the magazine the “American Rose” magazine, along with Executive Director, Laura Seabaugh. This magazine is completely dedicated to promoting gardening, education, preservation and appreciation of the rose. The American Rose Society is one of the few societies left that continues to publish a print publication 6 times a year along with several newsletters/bulletins and provides each member with a “Handbook for Selecting Roses” and “Creating a Beautiful Rose Garden” booklet. 
Former president & rose education advocate Jolene Adams believes that the only way to dispel the myth that roses are difficult to grow is rose growing education. The American Rose Society is dedicated to providing you the gardener with education on how to grow better roses. If you haven’t check them out. Rosarians are standing by to answer your questions. Rose.org 

 

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Easy To Love | Easy To Grow |Roses

Pretty Lady Rose
Pretty Lady Rose

An Easy To Love |  Easy To Grow | Rose Garden

“Roses Are For Every Garden” at  The Chicago Flower & Garden Show, interview with

What Jodie Henke of Living the Country Life radio (a Meredith, Better Homes & Garden property) will air across the U.S., on

85% of folks say roses are their favorite flower. They want easy-to-grow roses. Rose breeders are listening to YOU! Each year there are better minimal care roses available that you can have great success with. Here are some of the  Conard Pyle Star Roses and Weeks Roses, that I researched and have personally grown. I included them because of their beauty and ease of care. Star Roses and Weeks Roses supplied the roses for the Chicago Flower & Garden rose garden his year and last year  had been planned to be at the show. They are minimal care roses bred for their easy to grow qualities. I can vouch for their high degree of success in the garden. Christian Bédard told us ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ may be the best rose he’s ever bred and I can tell you its at the top of my list for perfection.

Living The Country Live Radio on 300 stations in 39 states.

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Hybrid Teas Roses | Americas Favorite Flower

Hybrid tea roses are perfect for any rose garden. They are perfect for cut flowers and creating our own bouquets. A hybrid tea is easily identifiable by their large shapely single flower blooms on long stems. Here are a few of the very best hybrid teas that are true winners.

‘Pretty Lady Rose’ New 2016 | Weeks Roses 2nd in their The Downton Abbey Series

  • Dark even rose pink almost fuchsia
  • 4-5 “ Large old fashioned ruffled petals
  • The smell of peonies with a hint of spices
'Francis Meilland'
‘Francis Meilland’

‘Francis Meilland’ 1996

  • Color: Very large shell pink flowers
  • Winter hardy disease resistant
  • Winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials Best Hybrid Tea
  • Strong fruity and citrusy fragrance
Award of Excellence Best Established Rose | Bred by Dr. Walter E. Lammerts (United States, 1954).
Award of Excellence Best Established Rose

‘Queen Elizabeth’ 1954

  • Pink 4” with large petals, and pointed buds
  • Moderate rose fragrance
  • Won ‘Best Established’ Rose at The Biltmore International Rose Trials when I was a judge in 2015

For Hedge and Borders I love Shrub roses because they grow from 5 to 15 feet in every direction based on your climate and growing conditions.

'Watercolors Homerun'
‘Watercolors Homerun’

‘Water Colors Home Run’ by Weeks Roses

  • 3 colors showy flame red | yellow gold pink blush | Hot Pink
  • Medium height and bloom size
  • Winter hardy and disease resistant
'Drift® Chamboeuf'
‘Drift® Chamboeuf’

‘Drift®’ Groundcover Roses by Star Roses and Plants

  • 8 colors from White Drift Rose to Red Drift Rose
  • Blooms 1 ½” -3” bushes about 2 feet tall spreading
  • Winter hardy, disease resistant, and easy to grow.
Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring in my Texas rose garden
Bonica, Shrub rose always the first to bloom in the spring in my Texas rose garden

Bonica® – Shrub

  • The Bonica rose has been voted the World’s Favorite Rose in by the World Federation of Rose Societies and an All-America Winner
  • Pastel pink, 3” blossoms, about 5’ tall spreading
  • Slight fragrance

For containers you can plant Miniature or miniflora roses known for novelty and versatility.

Some of the most beautiful and hardy are:

'All a Twitter'
‘All a Twitter’

‘All a’ Twitter’

  • Twinkling brilliant orange
  • Tall, medium size blooms
  • Winter hardy

‘Be My Baby’

  • Incandescent pink
  • Large round blooms, medium tall
  • Fragrance mild tea 

‘Sunblaze®’ Miniatures by Star Roses and Plants

  • All colors from amber-to yellow, vigorous, disease resistant, winter hardy.
  • 12-18 inches compact
  • Slight fragrance

For walls, fences, and pergolas we want climbing or rambling type roses for their unique long arching canes, and their ability to climb fences, over walls, through trellises, arbors, trellises.

‘Above All’

  • The old classic ‘Westerland’ raised modernized with 21st century ‘best-off-best’ qualities!
  • Salmon-orange blend, repeat blooming, 10-14 feet
  • Old fashioned, 3 ½”-4” blooms, fruity fragrance
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush

‘4th of July’

  • Gorgeous Red striped and bright white
  • 10-14 feet canes
  • Fresh cut apple and & sweet rose fragrance

‘Pretty in Pink Eden’ or ‘New Dawn’ (Light pink)

  • All qualities of highest rated, award winning rose ‘Eden Climber’ also known as ‘Pierre de Ronsand’ only deep pink
  • 10-12’ with gorgeous very double blooms 70-80 petals
  • Vintage rose fragrance, vigorous and disease resistant 

Floribundas

Beautiful Roses for the garden known for their profusion of bloom are floribundas. They bear flowers in large clusters and trusses with large clusters of and trusses. This class is unrivaled for providing massive colorful lasting garden displays that are hardier, easy care and more reliable in wet weather than their hybrid tea counterpart.

'Bolero' blooming as a perfect heart in nature
‘Bolero’ blooming as a perfect heart in nature

‘Bolero’

  • White, large blooms with 100 petals
  • Old rose and spicy fragrance
  • Bushy and about 3 feet tall
'Julia Child' by Weeks Roses featured this shot of 'Julia Child' in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar
‘Julia Child’ by Weeks Roses featured this shot of ‘Julia Child’ in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar

‘Julia Child’

  • One of the top selling roses in the world
  • Butter/gold color, medium very full 3-4” blooms
  • Strong licorice fragrance
'Easy Does It' by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops, a vision of perfection
‘Easy Does It’ by Weeks Roses with Rain Drops

‘Easy Does It’

  • Gorgeous Mango Peach
  • Ever blooming with a moderate fragrance
  • Disease resistant, one of my all time favorites!  

Be sure and join us at The Chicago Flower and Garden Show. This is only the 2nd year we will have roses blooming in March in a rose garden setting in Chicago at Navy Pier. We’ll have American Rose Society Consulting Rosarians there to answer your rose growing questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by MN Rose Specialist Deb Kaiser

Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser
Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser
Rose Specialist Munsinger & Clemens Gardens, Deb Kaiser, Expert on Construction Blanket Cold Weather Rose Care, With Jack Falker, The Minnesota Rose Gardener

Winter in Minnesota is a force to be reckoned with. Rose Specialist of the Munsinger & Clemens Gardens St. Cloud, Minnesota, Ms. Deb Kaiser, has found a kinder gentler way to wrap it up. The following is a Guest Post by Deb Kaiser.

Let It Snow | Snow Provides Isolation for Roses
Let It Snow | Snow Provides Isolation for Roses

Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by Deb Kaiser, Rose Specialist

With cooler weather in the forecast I have started to prepare my home rose garden, and the public rose garden that I work for, ready for what might be an early winter. In late August, I stopped fertilizing the roses with nitrogen. I deadheaded the shrub roses one last time. Now, I am letting them form rose hips and harden off for the winter. We have had lots of heavy rain this season. Much of it has been at night and our weather has been cooler, so blackspot has been a problem. I will continue to spray the roses every 2 weeks with a systemic fungicide Honor Guard (a generic for BannerMaxx) and Manzate fungicide both of which I purchase from Rosemania.

Construction Blanket Covered Roses
Construction Blanket Covered Roses

Winter Rose Protection With Construction Blankets by Deb Kaiser, Rose Specialist

With cooler weather in the forecast I have started to prepare my home rose garden, and the public rose garden that I work for, ready for what might be an early winter. In late August, I stopped fertilizing the roses with nitrogen. I deadheaded the shrub roses one last time. Now, I am letting them form rose hips and harden off for the winter. We have had lots of heavy rain this season. Much of it has been at night and our weather has been cooler, so blackspot has been a problem. I will continue to spray the roses every 2 weeks with a systemic fungicide Honor Guard (a generic for BannerMaxx) and Manzate fungicide both of which I purchase from Rosemania.

Jack Falker | The Minnesota Rose Gardener | Assisting Deb Kaiser With the Project
Jack Falker | The Minnesota Rose Gardener

So what can we do to help protect them from early winter temperatures and winds? One of the things that I am starting to do now is to feed the roses potassium, as a drench. I am following the recommendations of Twin Cities Rose Club member, Minnesota Rose Gardener, Jack Falker Please see Jack’s August & October 2012 blogs on the potassium feast for roses at http://jack-rosarian.blogspot.com.

Minnesota Roses Mulched Pruned Knee High | Ready To Cover
Minnesota Roses Mulched Pruned Knee High | Ready To Cover

Good winter protection methods are a must for zone 3 and 4 Minnesota winters. There are three main functions of winter protection – to keep the temperature high enough to prevent winter kill, to keep the temperature low enough to keep the roses dormant, and to protect the roses from drying and withering of canes caused by winter sun and wind. So what roses need winter protection? I winter protect all tender roses that are not hardy to zone 3.

Goose Girl in Snow
Goose Girl in Snow

Which roses to protect and the winter protection method to use depends on the degree of hardiness of the variety of rose. There are many cold hardy varieties of old garden and shrub roses that need no additional cover. They include albas, centifolias, damasks, gallicas, species roses, rugosas, Explorers, Parkland, some Buck Roses, and most Bailey’s Easy Elegance roses. There are varying degrees of hardiness within the cold hardy roses. Tip hardiness is where there is minimal winter dieback out to the tips of the rose canes. My Jens Munk and John Davis shrub roses always come to mind when I talk about tip hardy roses. These two roses require no cover. Their long canes can be seen sticking out of the snow banks. In the spring, they are the first of my shrub roses to leaf out. Crown hardiness is when the rose dies back to the ground. In spring, the plant sends out new shoots at ground level.

Easy Elegance 'Sunrise Sunset Rose'
Easy Elegance ‘Sunrise Sunset Rose’ introduced at the IGC Show in Chicago

My Bailey’s Easy Elegance roses may do this. There are varying degrees of hardiness in between. With good mulch and snow cover, most of my Easy Elegance and Northern Accents roses die back to somewhere between tip and ground levels.

Roses Mulched and Partially Covered
Roses Mulched and Partially Covered

Crown hardy roses need some mulch or other cover such as soil and leaves or marsh hay. Tender roses such as non-hardy (zone 5 and higher shrubs), hybrid teas, grandifloras, floribundas, minifloras, and miniatures need a good winter protection method.

Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s
Roses Covered w/Construction Blankets Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s

Winter rose protection starts with good summer rose care. Healthy plants survive the winter better — so water, fertilize, and spray for disease during the summer. Discontinue deadheading and using nitrogen fertilizer in late August to allow the roses to harden off for winter. Continue watering the roses into fall. Plant your tender roses in a sheltered location away from drying winds. Plant the bud union on grafted roses 2 to 4 inches below ground level. Choose varieties that are naturally hardy to zone 4 or less.

A winter protection method that is recommended for Minnesota winters, and was used at the Virginia Clemens Rose Garden in St Cloud, is the Minnesota Tip Method. Tender rose varieties are fatally damaged in temperatures below 20 degrees F. Late winter and early spring freeze and thaws can also cause damage. In 1954, Albert Nelson tried a method that he had observed raspberry growers using.

The Munsinger & Clemons Gardens Mulched and Blanketed
The Munsinger & Clemons Gardens Mulched and Blanketed

He tipped his roses and covered them with soil. This method of winter rose protection later became known as the Minnesota Tip Method. It was first demonstrated at an ARS Convention in Omaha in 1966.

The Minnesota Tip Method starts in mid to late October before temperatures drop below 20 degrees F. Spray the roses with a dormant spray such as Lime Sulfur or fungicides such as BannerMaxx and Manzate. Clean up the rose beds, removing dropped leaves and mulch, and remove diseased leaves on the plants to avoid overwintering of disease. Do not prune until spring, as pruning encourages new growth. Tie up the rose canes with orange poly twine, leaving a long tail. This makes the roses easier to tip and bury. The orange twine is easier to see when digging up the roses in the spring. Long lanky canes can be trimmed to make tying easier. Use pruning sealer on the cuts. Using a shovel, dig a trench as long as the rose is high, and wide enough to fit the tied rose. More than one tipped rose can be laid in the same trench. Use a spading fork to pull away the soil from the shank of the rose (below the bud union and above the roots) and loosen the soil around the plant. Dig carefully to avoid damaging the plant or its roots. Use the spading fork to push the rose into the trench. REMEMBER – only the roots bend. Pull more soil away from the shank to make it easier for the roots to bend. Hold the rose down while you cover it with 2 to 3 inches of soil. Add soil from other areas of the garden, if needed to cover the rose. Water the rose beds well to prevent winter drying of roots and canes. After the ground has frozen, cover the rose beds with 2 to 3 feet of leaves or marsh hay. Place several tin cans of rodent bait under the covering to prevent damage from chewing animals. Water the covering well to prevent fire and hold the covering in place. Loosely bagged leaves or insulated construction blankets can also be used as a covering.

Another method of winter rose protection is mounding up the base with 9 to 12 inches of soil. Use a wire cylinder to hold the soil in place. Don’t trim the rose unless necessary. Stuff the cylinder with leaves or marsh hay and cover the entire bed with a 2 foot depth of leaves or marsh hay. Water the rose bed well.

Pictures below is a shrub rose protected with leaves and boards.

Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s
Roses Covered With Construction Blankets | Held Down With Concrete Blocks and 2 X 4s

Note: The American Rose Society does not recommend the use of rose cones for zone 3 and 4 winters

The method of winter rose protection that I have used at home for the past eight years and at work for the past five winters is to cover the rose beds with insulated construction blankets. In mid-October, I cut back the roses to a height of 8 inches. Next, the roses are mulched heavily with several shovel scoops of compost, covering the graft and extending 1 ½ feet on each side of the plant. This year I added coffee grounds to my compost. When nighttime temperatures are consistently in the 30 degree F. range, I add rodent bait and cover the entire rose bed with R-value 7.48 insulated construction blankets. This should be done before temperatures drop below 20 degrees F. Blanket edges and overlaps are bricked down tightly and closely with many bricks. Avoid leaving gaps where air can get in. The blankets look like two tarps sewn together with a thick bat of insulation in the middle. The blankets come in two sizes – 6 foot wide by 25 feet long and 12 feet wide by 25 feet long. The shiny side of the blanket should face down toward the ground.

A method of winter protection that I use for overwintering potted roses is to put them in my attached garage. I spray the plant with fungicide and water it well. Next, I put it in a heavy weight, black garbage bag.

I tie the bag loosely to avoid mildew due to moisture build up. The roses are stored, off the floor.


Potted roses can also be laid on their sides and covered with insulated blankets or trenched and buried.
and away from drafts, in an unheated garage or room with temperatures between 20 and 40 degrees F.

Construction Blanket Covered Minnesota Roses Uncovered Showing Green in March Zone 3b as They Are Uncovered
Construction Blanket Covered Minnesota Roses Uncovered Showing Green in March Zone 3b as They Are Uncovered

In spring, I start removing the rose covering around April 1st. Rose coverings such as leaves, marsh hay, and soil, should be removed in layers as it thaws. About April 15th, I check to see if the soil is thawed enough to raise tipped roses to an upright position without damaging them. After the roses are tipped up and secured firmly in place, water the canes several times per day to avoid drying out from spring winds. Once buds form, fertilize the roses with a balanced rose fertilizer. Prune the roses after buds form and the plant is actively growing. Spray the roses regularly with a fungicide after leaves form.

A Garden Is A Place For Kids & Seeds To Bloom

Sakata Seed Company's Alecia Troy
Weeding
Oui One Weeds

“I had to beg my Mother-In-Law to give me the Seedkeeper Deluxe Seed Organizer, and I’m glad I did! I just love how easy it is to organize and find my Sakata Seeds! What a useful garden tool!  ~      Tanna Fox

Sakata Seeds and The SeedKeepers Deluxe Seed Organizer Kit is a marriage made in heaven!

The Seed Keeper Deluxe Organization System Showing some Formosa Liliy Seeds I received from Diane LaSauce at #G2B15 at P. Allen Smith's
The Seed Keepers’ Deluxe Seed Organizing System |D LaSauces’ Formosa Lily Seeds from P. Allen Smith’s #G2B15 | The Boss (aka my Daughter-In-Law) now has it to organize the Sakata Seeds for the Kids’ Garden

Last month the Sakata Seeds folks did a demo at P.Allen Smith’s Garden 2 Blog 2015 at his Moss Mountain Farm in Little Rock, Arkansas. They idea struck me while Tracy Lee was doing her presentation that these seeds are so precious what could be more perfect than the Seedkeeper Deluxe for organizing the seeds?!

Sakata Seed Company's Alecia Troy
Sakata Seed Company’s Tracy Lee along with Alecia Troy Were at #G2B15

Have you ever opened a seed packet and then the remains are scattered about who knows where? And its difficult to keep track of what’s what? Or have you ever planted the perfect seed and then not been able to recall or find the packet it came from? Those days are over with the invention of a product like this from entrepreneurs and friends Kerrie Rosenthal and Carol Niec, who I met at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show speakers reception planned by Bruce Bailey and La Manda Joy, author of  “Start A Community Food Garden.”

The Seed Keepers at Gaga's Garden
The Seed Keepers at Gaga’s Garden in Illinois Visiting

The Seed Keepers at Gaga’s Garden in Illinois Visiting

These lovely women and my beautiful daughter-in-law who by the way is the ‘boss of me’ are the reason I am planting vegetable gardens now. Oh…that and a few episodes of the Doomsday Preppers.  They invented the perfect system and gave me their Deluxe Kit as a house gift for inviting them to stay a few days and go out on the pontoon boat. Teasing Kerrie and Carol I always tell them you plant the seeds and send me plants!

TannaTessaW15“I wish I had this before we moved from Texas. I threw out hundreds of seeds because I didn’t know what they were! At the time it was easier to toss them than to try and organize them.”

~ Tanna Fox

Well, The Boss, aka, my daughter-in-law and I are planting a Special Needs Kids Garden. The Seedkeepers and my blessed daughter-in-law are the reason I started growing lettuce and all sorts of edibles again. You can tweet or ask Kerrie, I had to tweet her this question one night while we were online chatting about gardening: “How do I harvest my lettuce?” I love these Movie Star Seedkeeper Girls! They know everything about seeds! And remember you can eat roses but they will not sustain ‘Big Daddy’ for long! He eats real food

The kids in a tree
The kids in a tree

My grandson has Down Syndrome and is a blessing to us all. He loves to work on projects and especially in the garden. The future of gardening is in the hands of the next generation and especially those with special needs. With that said we, “the Boss” and I have started the “Special Needs Kids Garden, ” in her yard zone 7a.

Say What? Healthy Food from The Garden?!
Say What? Healthy Food from The Garden?!

Tanna was ecstatic to receive the Sakata Seeds, the deluxe SeedKeepers  storage kit and so the fun begins. Erik loves to go exploring for plants in the shade so we need ideas for shade plants and edibles that work well growing in perhaps 4 hours of shade.

Texas Kid's Garden
Texas Kid’s Garden | Where We Started

Planning and putting in your own kids garden is to bring your family together. Often times special needs kids feel isolated. Gardening and working in the garden can give a child a sense of community. We welcome ideas about plants kids love to grow and how you are getting your kids involved in gardening, especially special needs kids. We will be working in USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map 7a.

A Garden Is A Gathering Place
A Garden Is A Gathering Place

Be sure to go there first and put in your zip code to get your plant hardiness zone to know what types of plants are best for your area.  Ideas for plants and your experiences are welcome. Don’t forget I’m on Twitter as @gagasgarden, facebook pages are www.facebook.com/gagasgarden and /gagasgardens and gardenlegends. Tell ‘The Boss’ and me what’s going on in your Kid’s Garden and especially invite Special Needs Kids to participate.

TractorBoy_W15Our wonderful boy is speech delayed yet he has understood everything said to him from an early age. He can become frustrated and upset trying to communicate. Folks can misinterpret his language delay and underestimate his intelligence. This my friends can be a big mistake. Let’s Get it started.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gidding
John Gidding, Bruce Bailey, Amanda Davis

Thank-you Tony, Bruce, and LaManda, whose books are an excellent resource for learning about community garden projects.

Tony Abruscato | Abana Jacobs | The W
Tony Abruscato | Abana Jacobs | The W | CFGS Speaker Reception planned by Bruce Bailey and LaManda Joy

 

 

 

Who Is P. Allen Smith? (List of G2B15 Attendees)

'Black Dog'Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe

“We lead people by their hearts, not their minds.”

                                                                        ~ Gordon Tredgold

Allen Posing with a Distinguished Statue in the Park
Allen Posing with a Distinguished Turkey Statue in the Park

Who is P. Allen Smith?

He’s an award-winning garden expert, author, engaging story-teller and television host that will capture your heart

P. Allen Smith Rose Garden
P. Allen Smith Rose Garden

A Winning Team

Each year Allen and his formidable team lead by dynamo Mimi San Pedro invite garden writers to his Moss Mountain Farm in Arkansas to exchange ideas with each other and share the beauty of Arkansas with the world. Last year and next week we will be guests at The Capitol Hotel in Little Rock Arkansas. I’ve listed via Listly all the writers who are attending below. You can click like or add writers if you know they are going and I may have missed someone.

The winning Team P. Allen Smith and Mimi San Pedro
The Winning Team | Allen and Mimi San Pedro
Mary Ellen Pyle #G2B15
Mary Ellen Pyle | with Allen for over 20 years and a lovely task master! #G2B15

The Gardens

Last year we met a couple in the hotel that had traveled from Dubai to have their wedding in the Moss Mountain Rose Garden. The Wedding Planner was Renown Moss Mountain Weddings James Sumpter. Upon my first view of the rose garden I could understand why this couple would travel from around the world to have their wedding here.

Gardens at P. Allen Smith
Gardens at P. Allen Smith

I Wonder What Allen’s First Thoughts

were when he walked into the natural vortex, that draws you down a gentle sloping path forming a natural circular little valley along the Arkansas River. Was it, “And here I will build my rose garden, and they will come from far away lands to see it.” The Moss Mountain Rose Garden is designed within that natural circular valley. As I walked along the path to the rose garden I felt drawn into its beauty as if an unseen magical force was beckoning me into the ethereal depths. I learned from Allen to think on a grand scale when I saw his rose garden. I reminds me of Versailles.

Is That Your Grandmother?!

'Black Dog'Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe
‘Black Dog’ Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe as the painting hangs on P. Allen Smith’s dining room wall

Allen’s sense of humor is the most endearing of all his amazing talents. Dry and witty he keeps his guests entertained. Charming as ever he captivated us all with this story. Allen explained when he invites groups to his home inevitably they will be taken on the tour of his private Moss Mountain Farm residence. A student of human nature he explained he likes to catch side conversations. In the tradition of farmhouses of 100 years ago Allen has a parlor off to the right as you enter the residence. Straight ahead into the dining area is a life size painting of the famous Osage Indian Chief Shonka Sabe (Black Dog), Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe. Painted in 1834 by George Catlin known to be over 6 feet tall in full Indian regalia even carrying a rather large tomahawk. While taking the the group on tour Allen listened as the group rounded the corner and an obviously highly observant guest saw the impressive grand painting and said “I wonder if that’s Allen’s grandmother?” Allen quick witted as ever, replied with that raspy way of his holding back a little laugh,  “Not unless my grandmother carried a tomahawk!”

Stay Tuned For Allen’s Story of Taking His Pair Of Swans To New York City! New York City???!!! Yes! #G2B15 The Story Is Told for Posterity!

Edwin, Allen's prize Rooster
Edwin, Allen’s prize Rooster in the Chicken Palace

Who Is P. Allen Smith? A Master Story Teller!

P. Allen Smith Telling the Story of His Swans
P. Allen Smith Telling the Story of How His Swans Killed Each Other and Made A Debut in An Art Display in New York City and on the Front Page of the New York Times Arts Section

Visit Moss Mountain Farm And Find Out

If you haven’t made your summer plans I highly recommend going to visit Moss Mountain Farm and Little Rock Arkansas. And if you are planning a wedding this setting is idyllic.  Please watch next week for my posts about the #ARStory. I am delighted that garden delight herself, Julie Thompson Adolf and I of Garden Delights have been ask to take a road trip by the Arkansas Tourism Bureau and tell you about their beautiful state.

Star Roses and Plants Knock-Out® Roses in Bloom
Star Roses and Plants Knock-Out® Roses in Bloom

List of Garden 2 Blog Attendees 2015

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