Roses To Fall In Love With Hulthemias

'Easy On The Eyes'
‘Easy On The Eyes’ is part of the Weeks Roses Easy To Love® Collection

What Is A Hulthemia Rose?

Taxonomists A. Rehder to accommodate Wild Roses divided Genus Rosa into four subgenera; three very small and anomalous, namely ‘Hulthemia’, Hesperrhodos and Platyrhodon and one major Eurosa containing roses proper (see illustration). As much as this sounds a bit like dinosaur names ‘Duckbill Platypus’ and others, it’s simply a way to classify and detail Plantae vs. Genus Rosa species.

Hulthemias

According to Luis T. Desarmo’s book Principals Of Exhibiting & Judging Roses An Illustrated Approach” the Hulthemia “subgenera was subsequently disqualified from belonging to the rose family because of its solitary leaves attached to the stem rather than the compound structure of all other rose leaf sets (mainly 3,5,7,9, etc.) Classified now as a shrub the roses we see now coming from this sub-class are perfectly suited for landscape roses and minimal care rose gardens. If you like the beauty and originality of the look of the ‘Hulthemias’ rose breeder Jim Sproul has been posting incredible results that he’s getting with his ‘Hulthemia’ seedlings.

Eurosa

The difference in Eurosa versus Hulthemias is that they have smooth hips, and are divided in ten sections, three can be regarded as very small and of little importance as far as the garden is concerned. Chromosome count in the cell nucleus provides a major a principal subdivision:

  • Diploids | Wild Roses | 14 chromosomes: 2 sets of 7
  • Tetraploids | Roses | 28 chromosomes | 4 sets of 7
  • Hexaploid | Roses | 42 chromosomes | 6 sets of 7
  • Octaploid | Roses | 56 chromosomes 8 sets of 7 (only a few have 8)
  • Triploids | Pentaloids | are odd-numbered sets of chromosomes | lack fertility and don’t survive in nature.

No-Spray Roses

Matthias Meilland

Matthais Meilland Recently Commented on his Team’s presentation in China about no-spray roses

Promoting zero spray roses in China. No pesticide, no fungicide roses but with great blooming from spring to frost are key to the future of the rose market. Well done team !! Matthias Meilland

‘Easy On The Eyes’ Shrub In Bloom

To Show A 'Easy On The Eyes' Shrub In Bloom
‘Easy On The Eyes’ Shrub In Bloom

Description of ‘Easy On The Eyes’

Decades of hybridizing to enlarge the magenta purple eye to its current size has resulted in an extremely novel color combination with the lavender pink flower coloration. It’s floriferous, disease resistant, lovely dark green foliage and has a citrus like spicy fragrance. It’s a medium size round shaped bush and it’s just a lovely addition to the garden setting or could be planted alone. It was hybridized by Tom Carruth.

This image gives you a close-up view of details of the 'Eye' of 'Easy On The Eyes'
‘Easy On The Eyes’ Individual Flower

This image gives you a close-up view of details of the ‘Eye’ of ‘Easy On The Eyes’

‘In Your Eyes’

‘In Your Eyes’

‘In Your Eyes’ Description

Christian Bedard created this cross from a shrubrose and a Persian hulthemia. Once considered its own genus as described above, the Persian Rose is a tough desert rose native with a distinctivehalo around the center of the bloom, a characteristic passed on to ‘In Your Eyes’. It’s diamond tough, disease resistant and wildly prolific. It blooms in big clusters of pastel shades. The flowers start out cream-yellow with a red eye and matures to lavendar with a putple eyebut as eash bloom appears the clusters become multi-coloredfrom spring to fall.

  • 6-8 feet tall
  • Hardiness zone 5-9
  • Flowering Dates Late Spring through Fall
  • Winter Care mulch around the base
  • Flower color red, yellow, purple, pink
  • Pruning, prune to preferred shape
‘In Your Eyes’
‘In Your Eyes’ Changing Color
'In Your Eyes' Heart Shaped Bloom
‘In Your Eyes’ Heart Shaped Bloom
‘Easy On The Eyes’ Cluster

Why Hulthemias?

So Why Hulthemias? Because they are the optional no-spray minimal care rose. Many of my rosarian friends may argue that I started out this article saying that in fact they aren’t a rose. Perhaps, but Hulthemias provide an beautiful option for the gardener who is looking for absolutely minimal care, color, fragrance disease resistance and best of all no-spray.

Hulthemias Are Growing On Me

And they can grow on you too, give one or two a try. I think shrubs are happiest in threes. Happy Rose Growing.

Roses For Your Holiday Table

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You Can Have Roses From Your Garden On The Holiday Table

Every Thanksgiving it’s fun to see which roses are still in bloom to cut for the table. The pink rose bud you see in the little napkin holder in the video that I’ve made to show you how to easily fold your napkins into a rose bud to complete your rose themed holiday table is a late blooming ‘Kimberlina’.

 Place Setting With Jackson & Perkins Rose Duet And A Fresh Bouquet of ‘Easy Does It’

Late Blooming Roses For Our Thanksgiving Table

‘Kimberlina’ exclusive Jackson & Perkins Rose Blooms Early and into November 

Roses are a hardy plant.

Some varieties are more winter hardy than others. Christian Bédard developed ‘Party Hardy’ for his parents living in Canada to survive the Canadian winters. It was one of the roses we chose to have blooming in the Chicago Flower & Garden Show. This rose garden was the first blooming rose garden at this show at Navy Pier in Chicago in March in over 10 years, so I am told. It was so spectacular I knew I had to have it. When Richard accidentally cut down the butterfly bush at the base of the steps to the deck I knew the perfect rose to be planted at the foot of our party deck: ‘Party Hardy’. This rose was planted as a bare root rose last May. And it’s already 51/2 feet tall and blooming through November! deck (2009)

 

‘Party Hardy’ Bred by Christian Bédard (2009) To Survive The Canadian Winters Also Is Blooming In November

In most zones in the country where temperatures drop below freezing it takes three days below 21 degrees before roses fully go into dormancy. Don’t forget to check out what your plant hardiness zone is. I like PlantsMap because of the extensive data it provides you. This is the data for my zone in Illinois, plant Hardiness Zone. Each year it’s fun to see which roses are still blooming into November and can be cut for the Thanksgiving table. The rose gardens I had before were in Zone 8a 10°F to 15°F, N. Texas and in November there were more roses blooming at holiday time to choose from. Now I’m in Zone 6a. These are the freeze temp ranges for Zone 6a: -10°F to -5°F., Illinois. Now in zone 6a, it seems very similar to N. Texas in may ways, but about 10 degrees cooler most days, with very little snow and I still have roses blooming in November to share with you. This is a classic I took on Christmas Eve in Texas. I wrote a post called ‘Room With A View’ about this rose.

Rosie O'Donnell on Christmas Eve in Texas
Rosie O’Donnell on Christmas Eve in Texas

Rose Dormancy

It is part of the natural cycle whereby the rose drops any foliage that could be damaged by freezing temperatures.  In a way, the plant begins to create its own antifreeze.  The cell sap begins to thicken, helping to prevent the stems from freezing during the cold winter months. The rose itself goes into an almost hibernation like state where its metabolic systems slow and the nutrients are reserved deep within the core of the rose to aid in bud formation.

Try the Snap-Scratch Test*

To check if your plant is dead or just dormant, Oklahoma State University suggests what they call the Snap-Scratch Test:

Start by selecting the tip of a cane the size of a pencil. Grasp the cane and bend it sharply back on itself. A living cane will bend easily and eventually the stem will split showing moist wood within. A dead cane will snap cleanly with very little pressure and appear dry within. The scratch test is another common method. Use a knife or fingernail to scratch the bark on a young twig.

If the rose bush is alive, it’ll be green under the bark and slightly damp to the touch. A dead cane, on the other hand, will be brown and hard to scrape in the first place.

If you do see brown, work your way down the plant stem, too. Try the scratch test with a lower twig or lower down the stem. The plant may show signs of life as you near the roots. If it does, cut off the dead stems an inch or two above the growth.

* I input the words cane & rose bush vs. tree and branch since its the same for rose wood. 

‘Sugar Plum’ Has Continued To Bloom All Through November #myjproses

Additional Gardening Data You Obtain When You Determine Your Plant Zone

1990 Hardiness Zone: Zone 1b: -15F to -10F Illinois 1990 USDA Hardiness Zone Map
Average First Frost: October 11 – 20 Illinois First Frost Date Map
Average Last Frost: April 11 – 20 Illinois Last Frost Date Map
Koppen-Geiger Climate Zone: Dfa – Humid Continental Hot Summers
Ecoregion: 72j – Southern Illinoian Till Plain Illinois Ecoregions
Palmer Drought Index: Normal Illinois Drought Index Map
Heat Zone Days: 46 – 60 days Over 86°F Illinois Heat Zones Map

Annual Climate Data for Zipcode 62080 – Central Illinois

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
Avg Min Temp (°F) 18 22 32 42 53 62 66 63 55 44 34 23 43
Avg Max Temp (°F) 35 41 53 65 75 84 87 86 79 68 52 40 64
Avg Precip (In.) 2.16 2.21 3.51 3.91 4.31 4.15 3.9 3.21 3.1 2.93 3.82 3.07 40.29

Rose Beauty Wins Over Sustenance

The New Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Garden | Forefront 09-03162
The New Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Garden | Forefront 09-03162

Dating back 40 million years the first trace of roses have been found in fossils discovered in Colorado’s Florissant Fossil. Montana and Oregon have rose fossils dating back 35 million years ago before humans came into existence. Roses have been around since the dawn of time. There’s scientific evidence of roses in extreme Northern climates such as Alaska and Norway. Perceived as a warm weather plant it’s not confirmed that any rose grew in the wild below the equator.

The rose’s origin is believed to be 60-70 million years ago during the Eocene Era in Central Asia, spreading all over the Northern Hemisphere. Discoveries show us that the first civilizations to appreciate and cultivate roses were about 5000 years ago:

First Civilizations To Cultivate Roses

  • Egyptians
  • Chinese
  • Greeks
  • Romans
  • Phoenicians

Confucius, famous Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history tells us that the Chinese Emperor’s library had several hundred books on roses.

The Rose Garden Book On Roses

During the Han Dynasty (207 B.C.-220 A.D.) rose gardening had reached such a peak it encroached upon agricultural lands.

The Chinese Emperor issued an order to plow under some rose gardens!

Contrary to the Chinese Emperor’s edict we plowed under our crops for roses. It’s difficult to admit failure however I’m as allergic to tomato vines as I am to poison ivy! So it didn’t take an issue from a Chinese Emperor to plow under our vegetable crops, it only took a request by Jackson and Perkins to put in test gardens and their 2018-2019 roses.

My therapist, advisor, expert gardener daughter-in-law, as a reader of many gardening Web sites  explained to me, that you, dear reader, would occasionally like to hear of a crop failure. Well dear readers here’s mine: Tomatoes! Since you are used to beautiful rose pictures these pictures come with a warning. You may want to take the kids out of the room, what you are about to see  could be disturbing. 😉

Lone Tomato and the Lion Guarding His Crop

Lone Tomato | Flourishing Proven Winners Hydrangeas | ‘Francis Meilland’ in the background | Expired Tomato on the right

One Tomato Crop Yield

It Didn’t Take An Order From a Chinese Emperor To Convince Me To Put In The Jackson & Perkins Trial Rose Gardens

The proliferation of roses continue as of this writing according to Beth Smiley Editor of The American Rose Magazine, the official magazine of the American Rose Society*there are between 60-70,000 named roses. There are Species roses that are roses that have been growing wild for hundreds of thousands of years. Old garden roses are roses that were cultivated before the year 1867. Modern garden roses are the roses that have been introduced since 1867. Within these three groups, roses are divided based on their classes. Class divisions take into account their growth habits, the type of foliage they produce and the form the rose takes when it is fully formed. Jackson & Perkins is working with rose breeders to create roses that are what people tell us they want in their gardens

Hybridizers of roses today are listening to you, the rose gardener while developing better roses. Here’s what people say they want in their roses:

  • Beauty
  • Form
  • Fragrance
  • Easy Care
  • Disease Resistance
  • Variety of Color
  • Choice
  • Hardiness

That’s why we’ve kept a historical diary for years to compare factors that affect roses from season to season. You read above where the Egyptians required the citizens to plow under the roses for their crops, as a rosarian that plowed under the crops of vegetable gardens for the Jackson & Perkins rose trial gardens we’ll be keeping extensive records for you to learn about the best roses for your garden. Here are pictures of the roses.

Trial Roses In The Jackson & Perkins Rose Garden

Jackson & Perkins 10-00454 | Trial Rose Garden

10-01860-A1 Lavender Purple Shrub

09-03162-Floribunda-Salmon Pink
09-03162-Floribunda-Salmon Pink

08-00941-Yellow Grandiflora
08-00941-Yellow Grandiflora

The Newest Rose Garden

Here’s a link to the post showing you other great roses that we’ve put in the garden. We’ve also started a Jackson & Perkins Kordes Roses Sunbelt Garden that includes the Biltmore winner Polar Express Sunbelt. Planted just last April as bare root roses these roses are doing spectacularly with more info for you being gathered. Stay tuned for videos and articles.

‘Desmond Tutu’ Sunbelt a Kordes Rose offered by Jackson & Perkins

Check Out The Best Rose Resource The American Rose Society

If you haven’t checked out the American Rose Society, current President of the American Rose Society, Pat Shanley believes in sustainable rose gardening and is dedicated to every aspect to growing better roses. She also oversees the magazine the “American Rose” magazine, along with Executive Director, Laura Seabaugh. This magazine is completely dedicated to promoting gardening, education, preservation and appreciation of the rose. The American Rose Society is one of the few societies left that continues to publish a print publication 6 times a year along with several newsletters/bulletins and provides each member with a “Handbook for Selecting Roses” and “Creating a Beautiful Rose Garden” booklet. 
 
Former president & rose education advocate Jolene Adams believes that the only way to dispel the myth that roses are difficult to grow is rose growing education. The American Rose Society is dedicated to providing you the gardener with education on how to grow better roses. If you haven’t check them out. Rosarians are standing by to answer your questions. Rose.org 

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Building A New Rose Garden

 
Welcome To Green Acres: “What’s A Hybrid Tea?”

Starting over can be hard to do. Add giving up your award-winning dream rose garden, designed with love and filled with over 200 varieties it can be doubly hard. Living in a vibrant booming metro area, accepting the exceptional as the norm was a gradual paradigm shift for me. It never occurred to me I might have difficulty locating the rose varieties I left behind in my Plano award winning rose garden*.“

“He who would have beautiful roses in his garden must have beautiful roses in his heart.”     ~ Reverend Dean Hole     

My first indication it might be difficult to locate the varieties of container roses I was looking for was when I called the closest garden center (that I had to locate by going online and downloading the list of landscape & garden centers in the area) I could find and asking the garden associate that answered the phone if they had hybrid teas. Who promptly replied, “What’s a hybrid tea?”

This is ‘Black Cherry’ in my Plano, Texas garden. Thrilled to locate it at Jackson & Perkins its in this garden now! It came in a 2 quart container!

“Where can I find roses like you have?”

The question most often asked of me at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show while I worked at the rose garden promoting membership in the American Rose Society for ten days all day every day was, “where can I find roses like yours?” Thanks to Jackson and Perkins now you can have the varieties of roses you see in my pictures without the grief I had locating them. In a populated metroplex I had become used to selecting roses from a landscape & garden center that had roses nicely potted in containers placed all in a row, alphabetized by their name that published the list of availability a season in advance to download. Moving to a rural area was a wake-up call and a learning experience.

Transition From Gentrified Urban Rosarian To Rural Rose Gardener
Transition From Gentrified Urban Rosarian To Rural Rose Gardener

From Gentrified Urban Rosarian To Country Rose Gardener

As a totally spoiled DFW Metroplex dweller, the garden center I chose my roses from delivered them in 5 gallon containers on a flatbed truck. They also list their roses each year on their Web site in the fall of each year announcing the roses that will be available in February of the next year.

Jackson & Perkins Rose Garden | 2018 Test Roses

In this rural area of Illinois now like so much of the country where so many folks live that want roses, the closest garden center that sells any potted roses in containers is 80 miles away. Then when I drove to this garden center I found the selection wanting because after having a discussion with the owner of the Landscape Center on how he arrived upon his rose buying decisions the family run store said he gave the order form to an employee and they selected roses based on whether they liked the names. His inventory had already told the story. Roses that were ‘out of patent’ that had great names were sitting on his floor.

 

Black Cherry, Floribunda Rose Gagasgarden
I was Looking For Roses Like ‘Black Cherry’ Seen here growing in my Plano, Texas Garden

Spoiled pampered Gentrified Urban Rosarian that I was I thought I would waltz into the local Garden Center and select my container roses growing in 5 gallon pots and have all the roses I needed ordered and delivered to my new gardens.  Wrong. The  closest Landscape & Garden Center with any selection of container roses is 80 miles away and they didn’t then and still don’t carry the varieties I want.

So let’s talk about the facts.

Percentage of the Population in Rural Areas | Growth Target To Sell Roses

Welcome to Rural America Retailers

The rural portions of metropolitan areas with fewer than 1,000,000 residents cover 94 percent of their land areas. These areas include approximately 20 million residents, or 34 percent of the nation’s rural population. Only six percent of the land area in these metropolitan areas is urban.

Outside Metropolitan Area

This leaves a minority of 27.5 million rural residents living outside the metropolitan areas.Metropolitan areas are defined by OMB as labor markets with core urban areas between 10,000 and 50,000, and are not considered metropolitan. Approximately 98.5 percent of the land in micropolitan areas is rural. The rural population of micropolitan areas is 13 million. other 14 million rural residents live outside the micropolitan areas. However, there are still 4.7 million urban residents outside both metropolitan and micropolitan areas, with each of these urban areas having fewer than 10,000 residents.

Rural Land in Metropolitan America

Even where America is most urban, a strong rural element remains. This is illustrated in the Northeast Corridor, the “megalopolis” defined by Jean Gottman more than a half-century ago. The urbanization he identified is still short of continuous along the corridor. Rural areas interfere with urbanization in parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts. Nearly 60 percent of the land area in these adjacent metropolitan areas remains rural (Figure 5).

Question: Where Do You Get Your Roses Now?

I get my roses from the one of oldest most trusted brand names in America, a name that is synonymous with roses: Jackson & Perkins. I remember my mother buying roses and trusting Jackson & Perkins as her rose source. Now the 3rd rose garden has been transitioned back to where my heart leads me. It’s a Jackson & Perkins test rose garden. It has 4 Jackson & Perkins roses that as of yet are unmanned. Some of the most famous rose breeders have worked with Jackson & Perkins.  The roses in the garden are in the list below, you can click and vote on whether you like them. The biggest surprise I have saved for last. While in Chicago I worked, as you know representing Chicago Flower Show Director, Tony Abruscato and he partnered with Chicago Sculpture Exhibit. The artists would come and spend some time at the rose garden where we had their sculptures.

Sculpture by Michael Young | Chicago Sculpture Exhibit

Since I was there full time representing the rose garden, I also spoke for the sculpture artists as well. Michael Young is an artist that I ended up promoting and I believe we may have sold some of his pieces and the piece that was on display. Soon we hope to have a Michael Young Sculpture to set off the beauty of this Jackson & Perkins exquisite Rose Garden.

The Roses in The Jackson & Perkins Rose Garden

[listly id=”1XxG” layout=”gallery” per_page=”25″]

Benefits of the American Rose Society

Your comments & shares are welcome especially that I support the American Rose Society that offers so much in return for a minimal investment. Its one of the few memberships that still print a beautiful magazine 6 times a year with valuable educational information, a newsletter and an invaluable tool to choose roses: The American Rose Societies handbook for Selecting Roses, and once a year the Rose Annual. I have contributed articles to the newsletter, magazine and the Rose Annual, and would be happy to provide you with a copy of each.

*The Texas Rose Garden won Dallas Rose Society ‘Best Large Garden’ and was on the Plano Garden Tour, and was the recipient of many photography awards, blue ribbons as well, request rose bio for a list of all awards.

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Planting A Memorial Day Rose Garden

'Memorial Day' Blooming on a Fall Day in Illinois

Memorial Day Is To Honor Those Who Have Died in America’s Wars

Planting a ‘Memory Garden’ of roses gives you a connection to your loved ones that can keep your memories of them alive. It’s a deeply rewarding endeavor and can be a family project. Here’s how:

  1. Decide who you want to memorialize, perhaps order or make a plaque or bench for spending time and reflection. The Gardens of the American Rose Society offer ways to memorialize loved ones in their rose gardens in Shreveport, LA.
  2. Choose a location with 6-8 hours of sun. Some roses can do fine in partial shade. Both Europeana & Iceberg became covered in partial shade in my Texas rose garden and continued to flourish. This article discusses roses in partial shade by Al Whitcomb.
  3. You can order ‘Memorial Day’ from Jackson & Perkins’ online to plant as a tribute to loved ones. The most often asked question I had at the Chicago Flower & Garden Show is “Where do I find the varieties of roses I have?”, Jackson & Perkins online is an excellent source for Weeks Roses, Star & Certified Roses, since they are wholesale rose growers.
  4. Here are some ideas of roses suitable for a Memory Rose Garden, and ‘Memorial Day’ is a rose that tolerates heat very well. It’s included in the June issue of the American Rose Magazine article I wrote ‘Some Roses Like It Hot’ .
    1. ‘Memorial Day’ The All-America Garden Selections said “This One Is Definitely a ‘Year of the Rose’

      Memorial Day Blooming in the Garden in Illinois
      Memorial Day Blooming in the Garden in Illinois
    2.  ‘Veteran’s Honor’

      'Veterans Honor' Picture 'Veterans' Honor in Peak Form: Picture Taken May 18th, 2017 in Illinois Garden
      ‘Veterans Honor’ Picture ‘Veterans’ Honor’ in Peak Form: Picture Taken May 18th, 2017 in my Illinois Garden
    3. ‘Let Freedom Ring’

      Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns
      Let Freedom Ring photo by Dr. Tommy Cairns
    4. Mr. Lincoln

      Mr. Lincoln photo Tommy Cairns
      Mr. Lincoln photo Tommy Cairns

“We do not know one promise these men made, one pledge they gave, one word they spoke; but we do know they summed up and perfected, by one supreme act, the highest virtues of men and citizens. For love of country they accepted death, and thus resolved all doubts, and made immortal their patriotism and their virtue.”

James A. Garfield
May 30, 1868 Arlington National Cemetery

In 1873, New York was the first state to designate Memorial Day as a legal holiday

During that first national celebration, former Union Gen. and sitting Ohio Congressman James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, after which 5,000 participants helped to decorate the graves. The tradition of laying wreaths on the graves of our soldiers that lost their lives to War is carried out in cemeteries by devoted families all across our great country to this day. In fact many family members place wreaths on graves of veterans that have passed away as well even though Memorial Day is expressly to honor our war dead.

By the late 1800s, cities all across America observed Memorial Day. Several states had declared it a legal holiday, since it was widely established as a national holiday throughout the country.

When Is Memorial Day?*

In 1971, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act and established that Memorial Day was to be celebrated on the last Monday of May. “Memorial Day is celebrated at Arlington National Cemetery each year with a ceremony in which a small American flag is placed on each grave. Traditionally, the President or Vice President lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. About 5,000 people attend the ceremony annually.” 

* PBS.org educating folks on the true meaning of Memorial Day.

Roses Evoke Fond Memories

Memorial Gardens are becoming more popular as a way to honor and pay tribute to those that have passed on. Roses are especially popular as a flower to plant ‘In Loving Memory” because they are a trigger to so many fond memories of loved ones in our life either by their name that is like the loved ones name or our loved ones loved roses as their favorite flower. So this Memorial Day is a good time to plant a Memorial Garden and start your very own Garden of Memories. We’re only a Website away to answer your questions about rose growing. Have a blessed Memorial Day.

American Rose Society,                                                                                                             8877 Jefferson Paige Road                                                                                       Shreveport, LA 71119                                                                                                                           tel: (318) 938-5402                                                                                                                              Contact: Carol Spiers

 

 

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