Rose Classifications | Review Before You Buy

Gaga's Garden In Bloom
The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It
The Rose Garden | This Picture Can Barely Capture the Glory of It

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.”
― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Roses are the ‘Diva’ of the flower world. Statistics say you want roses is your garden. One of the most often searched plant is the rose. Before you head out to garden centers to buy roses here’s an easy guide to what rose classifications mean. Here’s a few rose winners to look for. Rose bushes are a big investment. Decide what you want to achieve with roses before you buy.

'Good As Gold' Hybrid Tea Rose. Bold, beautiful, double-dipped yellow burnished with a touch of golden red, its a heart stopper!
‘Good As Gold’ Hybrid Tea Rose. Bold, beautiful, double-dipped yellow burnished with a touch of golden red, its a heart stopper!

An Easy To Love |  Easy To Grow | Rose Garden

85% of folks say roses are their favorite flower. They want easy-to-grow roses. Rose breeders are listening to YOU! Each year there are better, minimal care roses available that you can have great success with. Here are some Weeks Roses, Meilland Roses, Kordes Roses, and Conard Pyle Star Roses that I’ve personally grown and can vouch for. Some roses I list below have won at the Biltmore Rose Trials. You can also see videos on my Gaga’s Garden Facebook page. They are included because of their disease resistance, ease of care, beauty and fragrance. I can vouch for their high degree of success in my Illinois and Texas gardens. A side note on one of my new favorite roses: World famous hybridizer, Christian Bédard told a highly reliable friend of mine that the hybrid tea ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ may be the best rose he’s ever bred. I can tell you its at the top of my list for true perfection.

Modern Rose Classifications

Hybrid Tea | Grandiflora Rose | America’s Favorite Flower

Hybrid tea roses are perfect for any rose garden.*

  • Hybrid tea roses are ideal for cut flowers and creating your own bouquets
  • A hybrid tea is easily identifiable by its large, shapely 30-50 petal blooms on long stems
  • Grandiflora roses bear clusters of full size roses, the 1st was ‘Queen Elizabeth’ in 1954

Here are some true winners:

A Candelabra of 'Pretty Lady Rose' 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses
A Candelabra of ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ 2nd in the Weeks Roses Series of Downton Abbey Roses | One of My Favorites

Weeks Roses 2nd in their The Downton Abbey Series | ‘Pretty Lady Rose’ New 2016 Description:

  • Dark even rose pink almost fuchsia
  • 4-5 “ Large old fashioned ruffled petals
  • The smell of peonies with a hint of spices

    'Francis Meilland' the Best Hybrid Tea named at the Biltmore International Rose Trials 2015
    ‘Francis Meilland’ hybrid tea rose, winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials ‘Pauline Merrell Award for Best Hybrid Tea Rose 2015’

‘Francis Meilland’ 1996 Description:

  • Color: Very large shell pink flowers
  • Winter hardy disease resistant
  • Winner of Biltmore International Rose Trials ‘Best Hybrid Tea’
  • Videoed and rated by me for the American Rose Society Web site
  • Strong fruity and citrusy fragrance

    Award of Excellence Best Established Rose | Bred by Dr. Walter E. Lammerts (United States, 1954).
    Award of Excellence Best Established Rose

‘Queen Elizabeth’ First Grandiflora 1954 Description:

  • Pink 4” with large petals, and pointed buds
  • Moderate rose fragrance
  • ‘Best Established’ Rose at The 2015 Biltmore International Rose Trials, I was a rose judge 

Floribundas | Polyantha

  • Floribundas are known for large clusters of flowered trusses & rapid bloom cycles
  • They bear flowers in large clusters and trusses in a profusion of bloom 
  • This class is unrivaled for providing massive colorful lasting garden displays 
  • Floribundas are hardier, more easy care & reliable in wet weather than their HT counterparts
  • Polyanthas are smaller but very sturdy plants with large clusters of small masses of blooms
'Bolero' In The Heat of Summer In Illinois
‘Bolero’ In The Heat of Summer In Illinois

‘Bolero’ Description:

  • White, large blooms with 100 petals
  • Old rose and spicy fragrance
  • Bushy and about 3 feet tall

    'Julia Child' by Weeks Roses featured this shot of 'Julia Child' in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar
    ‘Julia Child’ by Weeks Roses featured this shot of ‘Julia Child’ in The American Rose Society 2014 Calendar

‘Julia Child’ Description:

  • One of the top selling roses in the world
  • Butter/gold yellow in color, medium very full 3-4” blooms
  • Strong licorice fragrance

    'Easy Does It' In The Illinois Garden
    ‘Easy Does It’ In The Illinois Garden

‘Easy Does It’ Description:

  • Gorgeous Mango Peach
  • Ever blooming with a moderate fragrance
  • Disease resistant, one of my all time favorites! 

For Hedge and Borders | Shrub Rose| English Roses

  • Shrub roses grow  in a sprawling direction from 5 to 15 feet in every direction based on your climate and growing condition
  • The unique group of English roses hybridized by David Austin Roses belong to this class of shrub roses.
  • Recurrent bloomers, often have wonderful fragrance of Old Garden Roses
Close-Up of 'Watercolors Home Run' Shrub Rose
Close-Up of ‘Watercolors Home Run’ Shrub Rose

‘Water Colors Home Run’ by Weeks Roses Description:

  • 3 colors showy flame red | yellow gold pink blush | Hot Pink
  • Medium height and bloom size
  • Winter hardy and disease resistant'Bonica' Beautiful prolific ever blooming shrub

‘Bonica’ Beautiful prolific ever blooming shrub Description:

  • ‘Bonica’ Inducted into the World Federation of Rose Societies Rose Hall of Fame in 2003
  • Prolific, blooms in flushes throughout the season.
  • Prolific, flush, medium to large, cluster-flowered (26-40 petals) stems of blooms cluster-flowered shrub
'Drift® Chamboeuf'
‘Drift® Chamboeuf’

‘Drift®’ Groundcover Roses by Star Roses and Plants

  • 8 colors from White Drift Rose to Red Drift Rose
  • Blooms 1 ½” -3” bushes about 2 feet tall spreading
  • Winter hardy, disease resistant, and easy to grow’
Named for the founding figure of the Industrial Revolution
‘Abraham Darby’ a David Austin Rose amed for the founding figure of the Industrial Revolution

‘Abraham Darby’ Description: David Austin Shrub

  • David Austin Shrub rose
  • Very large, rounded, cup-shaped flower with up to 70 petals
  • Vigorous and hardy in all areas
  • Fruity fragrance

Large Flowered Climbers | Climbing Roses

  • Dominated by their growth habit with long arching canes
  • Ability to climb over fences, walls, trellises arbors and pergolas
  • Climbers offer a wide range of flower colors, forms, & shapes with canes from 10-14 feet tall.
'Above and Beyond' after its roped up!
‘Above and Beyond’ after its roped up!

‘Above and Beyond’ Description:

  • The old classic ‘Westerland’ raised modernized with 21st century ‘best-off-best’ qualities!
  • Salmon-orange blend, repeat blooming, 10-14 feet
  • Old fashioned, 3 ½”-4” blooms, fruity fragrance
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
Bee on Fourth of July Climbing Rose Bush
  • ‘4th of July’ Description:

      • Gorgeous Red striped and bright white
      • 10-14 feet canes
      • Fresh cut apple and & sweet rose fragrance

Miniature or miniflora roses

  • Ideal for containers and small space gardens, hardy due to being grown on own root
  • Great for edging, rockeries, indoor gardens
  • Minifloras are a new class introduced by ARS in 1999 for the size between miniature roses & floribundas
'All a Twitter'
‘All a Twitter’

‘All a’ Twitter’ Description:

  • Twinkling brilliant orange
  • Tall, medium size blooms
  • Winter hardy

*Roses require 6-8 hours of full sun. They will bloom with 4 hours of full sun but they have more foliage and less blooms.

 

 

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Rose ‘Easy Does It’ Repeat Performance

Roses Roses Roses In Bloom

Roses Roses Roses In Bloom
Roses In Bloom At First Light

Roses can be fun & easy-to-grow. If you want easy-to-grow roses, ‘Easy Does It’* tops the list. ‘Easy Does It’ blooms its precious, sweet mango orange heart out out from the first bud until the last day of winter when temps dip below 21 degrees for more than 3 days.

A rotogravure of ‘Easy Does It’ with light dancing among the petals of roses from dusk to dawn.

'Easy Does It' at Dawn Next to 'Hot Cocoa'
‘Easy Does It’ Next to ‘Hot Cocoa’ at Twilight

Each stage of bloom are shown with floribundas and hybrid tea roses ‘Elle’, ‘Hot Cocoa, and gorgeous ‘Pumpkin Patch’.

'Easy Does It' | 'Hot Cocoa' | 'Elle' | Pumpkin Patch'
‘Easy Does It’ | ‘Hot Cocoa’ | ‘Elle’ | Pumpkin Patch’ Floribunda Roses in a Garden Setting

Roses are a gathering place for family and friends. See how the rose ‘Hot Cocoa’ takes on such burnished rich tones.

'Easy Does It' | 'Hot Cocoa' | 'Elle' | Pumpkin Patch'Roses in The Garden
‘Easy Does It’ | ‘Hot Cocoa’ | ‘Elle’ | Pumpkin Patch’Roses in The Garden

‘Easy Does It’ floribunda rose, a little blooming machine ready to start all over again!

Rose Buds of 'Easy Does It' Floribunda
Rose Buds of ‘Easy Does It’ Floribunda

Happy #WordlessWednesday

Orange-pink Floribunda.
Registration name: HARpageant
Exhibition name: Easy Does It ®
Bred by Harkness (United Kingdom, before 2006).
Introduced in United States by Bailey Nurseries in 2010 as ‘Easy Does It’.
Introduced in United States by Weeks Wholesale Rose Grower, Inc.in 2010 as ‘Easy Does It’.

3 Climbing Roses ‘Big As A Barn’

'Stormy Weather'

'Above and Beyond' As Big as a Barn
‘Above and Beyond’ As Big as a Barn Ready to Burst Into Bloom

One qustion I am ask frequently is “what’s a great climbing rose?” Here are three early spring blooming climbing roses. Two that are as “big as a barn.” One is a compact ‘mysterious deep smoky purple that’s simply a stunner!

1. Above and Beyond’ LCI

  1. Winter hardy
  2. No-spray
  3. Minimal care
  4. Highly Fragrant

    'Above and Beyond' loaded with buds | Hydridized by Dr. David Zlesak | Winter Hardy, Easy-Care
    ‘Above and Beyond’ Large Flowered Climber loaded with rose buds | Hybridized by Dr. David Zlesak | Winter Hardy, Easy-Care, no-spray

    'Above and Beyond' loaded with buds as 'Big As A Barn'
    ‘Above and Beyond’ loaded with buds as ‘Big As A Barn’ | Next to ‘Above and ‘Beyond’ is Proven Winners Oso Easy ‘Paprika’ and ‘Fragrant Speader’

It is winter hardy, no-spray, minimal care and so enchantingly fragrant. Although it blooms just once a year in the spring, its worth having just for this spectacular bloom.

'Above and Beyond' Roses in Bloom in the Rose Garden
‘Above and Beyond’ Roses in Bloom

2. ‘Nevada’ Hybrid Moyesii

  1. Winter hardy
  2. Minimal care
  3. Blooms twice per year, white in the spring, pink in the fall!
  4. Highly fragrant

When the gentle spring breeze blows its petals appear to look as if the entire bush is filled with butterflies. The fragrance is divine.

'Nevada' petals looks like butterflies when the wind blows the petals
‘Nevada’ looks like butterflies when the wind blows the petals

'Nevada' Hybrid Moyessii | Blooms twice a year, very fragrant
‘Nevada’ Hybrid Moyessii | Blooms twice a year, very fragrant

'Nevada' a Hybrid Moyesii "loaded with buds ready to burst into its spring bloom 'big as a barn'
‘Nevada’ a Hybrid Moyesii “loaded with buds ready to burst into its spring bloom ‘big as a barn’

'Stormy Weather'
‘Stormy Weather’ appearing as big as a barn

3. ‘Stormy Weather’ LCI Large Flowered Climber

  1. Mid-size climber with full size roses, 8-10 feet
  2. Repeat blooms in uncommon intense color, creating the perfect contrast w/oranges, reds, whites & yellows.
  3. Fragrant­

    'Stormy Weather'
    ‘Stormy Weather’ Rose Blossom

    'Stormy Weather'
    ‘Stormy Weather’ beginning to blooming

Winterizing Your Roses

Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden

Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden
Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden

Seasons change and so do ‘Oui.”Do you seek permission to do something you want to do? Or get permission not to do something that you think you aught to do?* I do. Hold on to your bags of mulch! From ‘my lips to God’s ear’ I got permission from a higher authority not to cover my roses this winter! Maybe not directly from God but it was an answered prayer not to do something I didn’t want to do that I thought I aught to from a higher authority than me, William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub roses. I had the extraordinary good fortune to visit with Will Radler at the American Rose Society Fall Convention in Syracuse, New York while I was there as a guest speaker on photography. Will “gave me permission” to not cover my roses this winter. Mr. Fox aka ‘Big Daddy’ is my witness. So I’m not going to cover them. No extra mulch, no leaves, no piles of dirt. Don’t send me cards and letters Minnesota Rose Gardener, Jack Falker. Here’s what Will Radler says:

William Radler William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub rose. This is the rosarium or “greenhouse” where Radler is developing his next generation of roses. Only the best will ever make it to market. Some may even be good enough to become Knock Out® roses, which are noted for their disease resistance. More than 80 million Knock Out® roses have been sold since the first was introduced in 2000, making it the best selling rose series in the U.S.
William Radler William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub rose. This is his rosarium or “greenhouse” where Radler is developing his next generation of roses. Only the best make it to market. Some may even be good enough to become Knock Out® roses, which are noted for their disease resistance. Since the first Knock® Out rose was introduced more than 80 million roses have been sold making it the best selling rose series in the U.S.

“There are many factors why plants are winter hardy. ~ Will Radler

“When artificial means are used to bring a plant through winter, often they can conflict with some beneficial factors. For die-back-hardy woody plants, the simplest winter protection technique is applying a few inches of mulch year round. This allows the plant in the autumn to grow into its fullest state of natural dormancy. It prevents the soil from getting as cold as would in open ground. And it allows the plant to break dormancy slower in the spring. Cutting back the canes only in the spring provides shade to the lower branches and helps attract snow cover that insulates and guards against low temperature injury and fluctuating temperatures.” ~ Will Radler

American Rose Society National Convention Award for Best Climber Tempo Chicago Paula Ballin
American Rose Society National Convention Award for Best Climber Tempo Chicago Paula Ballin This is the rose I used the Minnesota Tip To Protect against N. Illinois Winter

I tried the Minnesota Tip method the winter after my climber Tempo won the American Rose Society National for Best Climber in Chicago. I wanted to winterize my rose that had just won an American Rose Society National Trophy for Best Climber. Lord help me if I had to tip roses for winterizing them I would not grow a single rose, or I would just treat them like annuals. I’ve witnessed wonderful folks in Minnesota tip entire parks full of roses! Wow they must love roses.

Snow Forming the Perfect Insulation for The Elevated Garden Last Year
Snow Forming the Perfect Insulation for The Elevated Garden Last Year

Minnesota tip method of protecting garden roses*

*This is the Minnesota tip method of protecting garden roses from the University of Minnesota.

“The “Minnesota Tip” is one of several proven methods for protecting roses against early freezes in the fall, the bitter cold of winter and the dangers of thaw-freeze cycles in the spring.

Protecting roses for the winter really begins with the work done during the summer. Bringing the roses into the fall season in the best of health is the first step in winter protection. Soon after the middle of October, preparation can begin for tipping the roses. Follow these steps when using the “Minnesota Tip” method for protecting roses during winter and early spring.

diagram of a tied up bushFigure A

diagram showing parts of the tied up plantFigure B

diagram of the plant underneath the groundFigure C

  1. Water generously one or two days prior to tipping to keep the soil in a moist, workable condition.
  2. The day before tipping, give the plants a good dormant spray such as a liquid lime-sulphur material.
  3. Tie the rosebush canes together to allow easier handling.
  4. Avoid pruning the bushes. Open wounds on the canes may not heal properly, as cold weather can inhibit the formation of a protective callus.
  5. Dig a trench, starting away from and working toward the base of the bush. The trench should be as long as the bush is high. The width and depth should easily accommodate the bush or bushes. Pull the soil away from the shank (i.e., the root stock area between the bud union and the main branching of the root system) to facilitate tipping the rose. A spading fork is helpful for loosening the soil around the roots.
  6. When the trench is ready and the roots of the bush are loosened, use a spading fork to push the bush into the trench (Figures A and B). Use the spading fork to hold the bush down while covering it with 2 or 3 inches of soil. If the soil removed in digging the trenches is not enough, add soil from the annual garden or elsewhere (Figure C).
  7. Cover the soil with about 18″ of loose leaves or other covering such as marsh hay.

Proven Winners Oso Easy 'Oh My!' and Double Knock Out® on a Fall Day in the Rose Garden
Proven Winners Oso Easy ‘Oh My!’ and Double Knock Out® on a Fall Day in the Rose Garden
‘Weeks Roses ‘Easy Does It’; ‘Hot Cocoa’; and ‘Pumpkin Patch’

Next spring, start uncovering the rose bushes about April 1st. Begin by removing the leaves and then gradually remove the soil as it progressively thaws. On or about April 15th, raise the plants to an upright position and syringe the canes often with water to prevent them from drying out. Once the plants have been lifted, spray with a good all-purpose fungicide and insecticide and make sure they are adequately watered”

So don’t do as I do do, what you want. When I lived in N. Illinois I never used winter protection and the ground froze and ice and snow protected my roses just fine.

Let me tell you why I am not covering my roses. It’s a test to see how much difference it actually makes in how the roses fair. And this season after the Chicago Flower & Garden Show removing 50 bags of mulch and clearing the garden was just a crazy amount of work. I’ll report to you how the roses fair covered versus uncovered after a Central Illinois zone 6b winter.

Doris Day in the Garden on a Fall Day
Doris Day in the Garden on a Fall Day

Read About Susan Fox Famous ‘Oui Theory’*

** It Reminds me of The Apostle Paul’s spiritual conflict Roman’s 7:8-13

The Garden on a Fall Day | Double Knock Out®
The Garden on a Fall Day | Double Knock Out®