Winterizing Your Roses

Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden
Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden
Double Knock Out® Roses With Ice Crystals at Sunrise in The Garden

Seasons change and so do ‘Oui.”Do you seek permission to do something you want to do? Or get permission not to do something that you think you aught to do?* I do. Hold on to your bags of mulch! From ‘my lips to God’s ear’ I got permission from a higher authority not to cover my roses this winter! Maybe not directly from God but it was an answered prayer not to do something I didn’t want to do that I thought I aught to from a higher authority than me, William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub roses. I had the extraordinary good fortune to visit with Will Radler at the American Rose Society Fall Convention in Syracuse, New York while I was there as a guest speaker on photography. Will “gave me permission” to not cover my roses this winter. Mr. Fox aka ‘Big Daddy’ is my witness. So I’m not going to cover them. No extra mulch, no leaves, no piles of dirt. Don’t send me cards and letters Minnesota Rose Gardener, Jack Falker. Here’s what Will Radler says:

William Radler William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub rose. This is the rosarium or “greenhouse” where Radler is developing his next generation of roses. Only the best will ever make it to market. Some may even be good enough to become Knock Out® roses, which are noted for their disease resistance. More than 80 million Knock Out® roses have been sold since the first was introduced in 2000, making it the best selling rose series in the U.S.
William Radler William Radler, developer of the popular Knock Out® shrub rose. This is his rosarium or “greenhouse” where Radler is developing his next generation of roses. Only the best make it to market. Some may even be good enough to become Knock Out® roses, which are noted for their disease resistance. Since the first Knock® Out rose was introduced more than 80 million roses have been sold making it the best selling rose series in the U.S.

“There are many factors why plants are winter hardy. ~ Will Radler

“When artificial means are used to bring a plant through winter, often they can conflict with some beneficial factors. For die-back-hardy woody plants, the simplest winter protection technique is applying a few inches of mulch year round. This allows the plant in the autumn to grow into its fullest state of natural dormancy. It prevents the soil from getting as cold as would in open ground. And it allows the plant to break dormancy slower in the spring. Cutting back the canes only in the spring provides shade to the lower branches and helps attract snow cover that insulates and guards against low temperature injury and fluctuating temperatures.” ~ Will Radler

American Rose Society National Convention Award for Best Climber Tempo Chicago Paula Ballin
American Rose Society National Convention Award for Best Climber Tempo Chicago Paula Ballin This is the rose I used the Minnesota Tip To Protect against N. Illinois Winter

I tried the Minnesota Tip method the winter after my climber Tempo won the American Rose Society National for Best Climber in Chicago. I wanted to winterize my rose that had just won an American Rose Society National Trophy for Best Climber. Lord help me if I had to tip roses for winterizing them I would not grow a single rose, or I would just treat them like annuals. I’ve witnessed wonderful folks in Minnesota tip entire parks full of roses! Wow they must love roses.

Snow Forming the Perfect Insulation for The Elevated Garden Last Year
Snow Forming the Perfect Insulation for The Elevated Garden Last Year

Minnesota tip method of protecting garden roses*

*This is the Minnesota tip method of protecting garden roses from the University of Minnesota.

“The “Minnesota Tip” is one of several proven methods for protecting roses against early freezes in the fall, the bitter cold of winter and the dangers of thaw-freeze cycles in the spring.

Protecting roses for the winter really begins with the work done during the summer. Bringing the roses into the fall season in the best of health is the first step in winter protection. Soon after the middle of October, preparation can begin for tipping the roses. Follow these steps when using the “Minnesota Tip” method for protecting roses during winter and early spring.

diagram of a tied up bushFigure A

diagram showing parts of the tied up plantFigure B

diagram of the plant underneath the groundFigure C

  1. Water generously one or two days prior to tipping to keep the soil in a moist, workable condition.
  2. The day before tipping, give the plants a good dormant spray such as a liquid lime-sulphur material.
  3. Tie the rosebush canes together to allow easier handling.
  4. Avoid pruning the bushes. Open wounds on the canes may not heal properly, as cold weather can inhibit the formation of a protective callus.
  5. Dig a trench, starting away from and working toward the base of the bush. The trench should be as long as the bush is high. The width and depth should easily accommodate the bush or bushes. Pull the soil away from the shank (i.e., the root stock area between the bud union and the main branching of the root system) to facilitate tipping the rose. A spading fork is helpful for loosening the soil around the roots.
  6. When the trench is ready and the roots of the bush are loosened, use a spading fork to push the bush into the trench (Figures A and B). Use the spading fork to hold the bush down while covering it with 2 or 3 inches of soil. If the soil removed in digging the trenches is not enough, add soil from the annual garden or elsewhere (Figure C).
  7. Cover the soil with about 18″ of loose leaves or other covering such as marsh hay.
Proven Winners Oso Easy 'Oh My!' and Double Knock Out® on a Fall Day in the Rose Garden
Proven Winners Oso Easy ‘Oh My!’ and Double Knock Out® on a Fall Day in the Rose Garden
‘Weeks Roses ‘Easy Does It’; ‘Hot Cocoa’; and ‘Pumpkin Patch’

Next spring, start uncovering the rose bushes about April 1st. Begin by removing the leaves and then gradually remove the soil as it progressively thaws. On or about April 15th, raise the plants to an upright position and syringe the canes often with water to prevent them from drying out. Once the plants have been lifted, spray with a good all-purpose fungicide and insecticide and make sure they are adequately watered”

So don’t do as I do do, what you want. When I lived in N. Illinois I never used winter protection and the ground froze and ice and snow protected my roses just fine.

Let me tell you why I am not covering my roses. It’s a test to see how much difference it actually makes in how the roses fair. And this season after the Chicago Flower & Garden Show removing 50 bags of mulch and clearing the garden was just a crazy amount of work. I’ll report to you how the roses fair covered versus uncovered after a Central Illinois zone 6b winter.

Doris Day in the Garden on a Fall Day
Doris Day in the Garden on a Fall Day

Read About Susan Fox Famous ‘Oui Theory’*

** It Reminds me of The Apostle Paul’s spiritual conflict Roman’s 7:8-13

The Garden on a Fall Day | Double Knock Out®
The Garden on a Fall Day | Double Knock Out®

 

 

Who Is P. Allen Smith? (List of G2B15 Attendees)

'Black Dog'Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe

“We lead people by their hearts, not their minds.”

                                                                        ~ Gordon Tredgold

Allen Posing with a Distinguished Statue in the Park
Allen Posing with a Distinguished Turkey Statue in the Park

Who is P. Allen Smith?

He’s an award-winning garden expert, author, engaging story-teller and television host that will capture your heart

P. Allen Smith Rose Garden
P. Allen Smith Rose Garden

A Winning Team

Each year Allen and his formidable team lead by dynamo Mimi San Pedro invite garden writers to his Moss Mountain Farm in Arkansas to exchange ideas with each other and share the beauty of Arkansas with the world. Last year and next week we will be guests at The Capitol Hotel in Little Rock Arkansas. I’ve listed via Listly all the writers who are attending below. You can click like or add writers if you know they are going and I may have missed someone.

The winning Team P. Allen Smith and Mimi San Pedro
The Winning Team | Allen and Mimi San Pedro
Mary Ellen Pyle #G2B15
Mary Ellen Pyle | with Allen for over 20 years and a lovely task master! #G2B15

The Gardens

Last year we met a couple in the hotel that had traveled from Dubai to have their wedding in the Moss Mountain Rose Garden. The Wedding Planner was Renown Moss Mountain Weddings James Sumpter. Upon my first view of the rose garden I could understand why this couple would travel from around the world to have their wedding here.

Gardens at P. Allen Smith
Gardens at P. Allen Smith

I Wonder What Allen’s First Thoughts

were when he walked into the natural vortex, that draws you down a gentle sloping path forming a natural circular little valley along the Arkansas River. Was it, “And here I will build my rose garden, and they will come from far away lands to see it.” The Moss Mountain Rose Garden is designed within that natural circular valley. As I walked along the path to the rose garden I felt drawn into its beauty as if an unseen magical force was beckoning me into the ethereal depths. I learned from Allen to think on a grand scale when I saw his rose garden. I reminds me of Versailles.

Is That Your Grandmother?!

'Black Dog'Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe
‘Black Dog’ Shonka Sabe (Black Dog). Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe as the painting hangs on P. Allen Smith’s dining room wall

Allen’s sense of humor is the most endearing of all his amazing talents. Dry and witty he keeps his guests entertained. Charming as ever he captivated us all with this story. Allen explained when he invites groups to his home inevitably they will be taken on the tour of his private Moss Mountain Farm residence. A student of human nature he explained he likes to catch side conversations. In the tradition of farmhouses of 100 years ago Allen has a parlor off to the right as you enter the residence. Straight ahead into the dining area is a life size painting of the famous Osage Indian Chief Shonka Sabe (Black Dog), Chief of the Hunkah division of the Osage tribe. Painted in 1834 by George Catlin known to be over 6 feet tall in full Indian regalia even carrying a rather large tomahawk. While taking the the group on tour Allen listened as the group rounded the corner and an obviously highly observant guest saw the impressive grand painting and said “I wonder if that’s Allen’s grandmother?” Allen quick witted as ever, replied with that raspy way of his holding back a little laugh,  “Not unless my grandmother carried a tomahawk!”

Stay Tuned For Allen’s Story of Taking His Pair Of Swans To New York City! New York City???!!! Yes! #G2B15 The Story Is Told for Posterity!

Edwin, Allen's prize Rooster
Edwin, Allen’s prize Rooster in the Chicken Palace

Who Is P. Allen Smith? A Master Story Teller!

P. Allen Smith Telling the Story of His Swans
P. Allen Smith Telling the Story of How His Swans Killed Each Other and Made A Debut in An Art Display in New York City and on the Front Page of the New York Times Arts Section

Visit Moss Mountain Farm And Find Out

If you haven’t made your summer plans I highly recommend going to visit Moss Mountain Farm and Little Rock Arkansas. And if you are planning a wedding this setting is idyllic.  Please watch next week for my posts about the #ARStory. I am delighted that garden delight herself, Julie Thompson Adolf and I of Garden Delights have been ask to take a road trip by the Arkansas Tourism Bureau and tell you about their beautiful state.

Star Roses and Plants Knock-Out® Roses in Bloom
Star Roses and Plants Knock-Out® Roses in Bloom

List of Garden 2 Blog Attendees 2015

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